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Projects I want some new body shop inventions !!!

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by 31Vicky with a hemi, Dec 21, 2017.

  1. theHIGHLANDER
    Joined: Jun 3, 2005
    Posts: 8,059

    theHIGHLANDER
    Member

    All the concerns over "pencil" sanding tools, edges, cracks, reveals, door jambs, blah, blah, fuckin blah. Scotchbite. Yeah, I said it. "Scuff Pad" in body shop lingo. Red and grey are the standards, green n white are "specials" in general. The thing to remember, and even the most seasoned of finish guys miss it now and then, don't push so damn hard. Let the pad do the work. Push hard and it literally "melts",or more accurate, bonds itself together from that localized heat and stops working. All the consternation of sanding into a reveal (like on a 30s body) usually has the finisher doing the "tootsie roll" with sandpaper of varied grits over the course of the job. The reward is the wobbly grooves under the raised reveals that you see from 30+ feet away. Makes me say "...forever rookie..." when I see it. Then there's the old venerable red rubber block, you know the one with the nails in the fold that holds the paper, right? Hard to forget the size when you see the groove below the reveal, also from 30' away, and often runs the full length of the door or indeed the whole car. "Ok Highlander, shut up and get to it!" is likely in your head now, right? So your body work is done and the primer is so nice you almost don't want to paint it, and here comes the worry, "I gotta make sure I sand in the groove/reveal/etc...". 1st thing you do is take a red pad and gently scuff it. Don't dig at it, don't melt it red, don't make a tool shaped like it, just wipe it easy like you would with a solvent rag. Trust me, it's enough. Once done you can block sand the surface to perfect and NEVER see the groove, never see the block line from sanding along it's length, and best of all it's EASY. I like EASY, I'm lazy like that. Is it reliable? Will the paint stay? I have cars over 20 years old in lacquer and urethane, haven't peeled yet.

    Mixing filler with glaze? Abso-fuckin-lutely. Main reason for me is multiple fills. The hardness changes and the new is too soft, the feather edge becomes stubborn, so it's wait or improvize. I don't care if it's $100/gal mud that washes your dishes for you, the differing hardness in multiple coats basically sucks and requires 110% attention and discipline, but remember, I'm lazy like that and usually just don't want to wait for each layer to get the same hardness. Mixed with Metalglaze or Icing, a "taa-daa"moment for those final skim or finish coats.

    So my invention? Conversation with like-minded folk and sharing ideas. Scuff pad 1st, even on a refinish deal, just scuff out those jambs, reveals, grooves, any of it before you plug in the DA. Now, there is a cross-over product that might work for those little holes or deep chips that would be misery to feather, easier to fill. Mrs Highlander does nails and acrylic tips. She uses a powder and monomer that hardens the fill material in minutes. Applies with a simple brush, would be great for such things.
    At the end of the day we need to keep a lot of this shit in perspective. Sometimes the answer is a cup of coffee away and easier than we think. Then again, all the stuff I work on is ancient technology to begin with so perhaps re-inventing the wheel doesn't occur to me very often. Merry Christmas, Happy New Year, make it shine.
     
  2. 3D PRINTER AND A ROBOT PAINT SPRAYER....
     
  3. ceege
    Joined: Jul 4, 2017
    Posts: 204

    ceege
    Member
    from NW MT

    I totally agree about the scuff pad. I always cut the scuff pad into smaller pieces instead of tearing them. Gotta keep that tender edge in tact.
    If you are sanding multiple layers of plastic filler, you are shooting yourself in the foot.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  4. sunbeam
    Joined: Oct 22, 2010
    Posts: 4,974

    sunbeam
    Member

    Will a mig let you bond a aluminum panel to a steel frame?
     
    loudbang likes this.
  5. Sounds like a bunch of you need to try Evercoat's Rage Ultra. Doesn't get harder over time so every coat sands the same whether you put it on today or last week, flows out and glosses over like a putty, sands super easy and comes in two different speeds so if it's super hot out or you are trying to do a larger area you can slow it down with out under catalyzing it.
     
  6. So how does the speed change- different hardeners or different product?

    USC is sorta local to me. A good friend of mine does some inside contract maintenance work at the plant. His contact person at the plant told him about this stuff and gave him a gallon to try. He In turn told me and so forth. Even though it's local and manufactured, mixed and canned just a few miles from me, no one caries it and I have to special order it in. I pay 26.50 a gallon if I buy a case.

    I did a side by side comparison to the Rage Ultra ($60.00) and I like this AG47 ($26.50) and I like the USC product better.

    http://uschem.com/products/docs/TDS_AG47_4-24-141.pdf

    image.png

    image.png

    image.png
     
    loudbang likes this.
  7. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 17,656

    gimpyshotrods
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Sure. I have welded aluminum to steel, on several occasions.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  8. Fortunateson
    Joined: Apr 30, 2012
    Posts: 3,422

    Fortunateson
    Member

    Didn't think it was possible. Can you explain the technique?
     
  9. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 17,656

    gimpyshotrods
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Friction is the industry standard.

    I have plug welded steel through aluminum, mostly on Porsche bumpers, to replace a fragile section on track cars.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  10. blowby
    Joined: Dec 27, 2012
    Posts: 6,871

    blowby
    Member
    from Nicasio Ca

    Yep, carved a few seized pistons off cylinder walls.
     
    gimpyshotrods likes this.
  11. In 2016 GM announced they were the first auto manufacturers to utilize aluminum to steel welding.

    Friction will do it, been welding aluminum Pistons to cast iron cylinders for a long time.

    Then there's this
     
    loudbang and gimpyshotrods like this.
  12. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 17,656

    gimpyshotrods
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Alumasteel filler is not a new invention, either.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  13. clem
    Joined: Dec 20, 2006
    Posts: 2,999

    clem
    Member

    Some of the best comments on this thread !
    Seriously, in any occupation,trade, hobby, this is good advice.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  14. you can solder them with Muggy Welding rods
     
    loudbang likes this.
  15. 41fastback
    Joined: Sep 25, 2005
    Posts: 344

    41fastback
    Member

    https://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=6094
     
    loudbang likes this.

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