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Projects How to give your freshly powder coated wire wheels a weathered look.

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by edwardlloyd, Jun 2, 2017.

  1. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,067

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    Today I worked out how to age my freshly powder coated wheels.
    Here's how!
    Carefully wrap them in plastic coated foam to protect them and carefully store them away.
    Then completely clean your shop.
    Next turn your attention to welding up your '32 frame rails.
    When you notice your back getting really hot turn around and observe your carefully wrapped wire wheels blazing away under the bench.
    Grab the fire extinguisher and proceed to douse the flames. Drop your welding helmet in the fire in the process if you want that to look aged too, as I obviously did.
    Spend the next hour re-cleaning the shop and vacuuming up all the white powder.
    Clean all the melted rubber off the wheels and away you go.
    Aged looking wire wheels the easy way.

    [​IMG]

    Sent from my SM-G935F using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  2. bummer.
    prep and powder coating........take two.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  3. oldolds
    Joined: Oct 18, 2010
    Posts: 3,170

    oldolds
    Member

    I hate when that happens!
     
    loudbang likes this.
  4. Aaron D.
    Joined: Oct 27, 2015
    Posts: 989

    Aaron D.
    Member

    Sorry man, had to giggle when I read that.
     
    loudbang likes this.

  5. Always wrap your stuff in asbestos!:p:D
     
    slowmotion, loudbang and dana barlow like this.
  6. bct
    Joined: Apr 4, 2005
    Posts: 3,099

    bct
    Member

    could have been worse. what started it?
     
    loudbang likes this.
  7. well at least you didn't Age the whole garage. Congrats on catching it before that happened.
     
  8. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,067

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    A spark from welding even though I was at least eight feet away.

    Sent from my SM-G935F using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
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  9. flatheadpete
    Joined: Oct 29, 2003
    Posts: 10,191

    flatheadpete
    Member
    from Burton, MI

    Glad you weren't hurt. Bummer.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  10. willysguy
    Joined: Oct 2, 2007
    Posts: 1,215

    willysguy
    Member
    from Canada

    Good that you had a working extinguisher big enough to handle that, and put it out. Could have been way worse.
     
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  11. Sporty45
    Joined: Jun 1, 2015
    Posts: 989

    Sporty45
    Member
    from NH Boonies

    Damn, I'm going to have to be more careful when I weld, my shop is not the neatest!
     
    loudbang likes this.
  12. rusty rocket
    Joined: Oct 30, 2011
    Posts: 4,247

    rusty rocket
    Member

    Holy cow. As stated above at least the garage is still standing.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  13. 325w
    Joined: Feb 18, 2008
    Posts: 5,609

    325w
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Burning foam is hard on your lungs. Buy yourself a lottery ticket.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  14. And a Tig welder
     
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  15. adam401
    Joined: Dec 27, 2007
    Posts: 2,457

    adam401
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Oh man another fake patina thread. Gimme a break!
    Just kidding haha sorry bought your wheels that sucks. That's a real public service announcement for having a fire extinguisher on hand though. Fire happens so damn fast.
     
    bct, loudbang and The Shift Wizard like this.
  16. Accidents happen,even when we are carefully & assume we have all bases covered,it sucks that a wayward spark screwed up the freshly powder coated wheels but thankfully you had a fire extinguisher close by.

    Your misfortune is a reminder to the rest of us to check our fire extinguishers and make sure they are in working order and up to date.

    BTW,I just walked out in the shop and one of my two fire extinguishers has expired over 2 years ago,I put it in the truck and taking it to Fire & Safety today! HRP
     
  17. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,067

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    Ours are checked by a fire official once a year. We have them at every work area. You need to get to them fast. It was extinguished 10 seconds after I noticed it.

    I also never leave the shop until 30 minutes after finishing welding. These things can take awhile to develop. About 10 years ago I was parting out a 46 Ford in the same shop and the damn thing caught fire 15 minutes after I'd plasma cut some parts off it. Again a big mess after hitting it with a powder extinguisher.

    Sent from my SM-G935F using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2017
    tb33anda3rd likes this.
  18. chiro
    Joined: Jun 23, 2008
    Posts: 940

    chiro
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Going to buy an extinguisher for my garage TODAY!!! I NEVER weld in my wood frame single car garage. I'm too scared to for just that reason. I always roll the welder and whatever I'm welding outside. So...no welding on windy days or if raining.

    Andy
     
  19. woodz
    Joined: Feb 23, 2010
    Posts: 517

    woodz
    Member

    Sorry about your wheels and glad it didn't end up worse.
    But, that was a well written "how to" and i enjoyed the laugh this morning.
    Thank you


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  20. I usually (and far too often) give myself the weathered look with the same technique.

    Grinding is another easy way to light your shop (and yourself) on fire. Grinding on my work bench, I shot some sparks into an open box of steel wool a few months ago, it was a freak shot that I probably couldn't have made if I tried, but if I hadn't noticed right away things might've gotten exciting. Have a look on youtube for steel wool fire, pretty crazy stuff.
     
  21. 49ratfink
    Joined: Feb 8, 2004
    Posts: 18,084

    49ratfink
    Member
    from California

    a buddy of mine gave the weathered look to his 55 Chevy when he caught the car cover on fire. luckily it only destroyed the paint and didn't take down the whole house.
     
  22. Ebbsspeed
    Joined: Nov 11, 2005
    Posts: 5,535

    Ebbsspeed
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I had a "fire in the shop" experience a few years ago. I had just purchased a Miller Synchrowave and was practicing welding aluminum. I have a steel 55 gallon drum open top trash can, and I laid a piece of 1/8 inch plate over the top for a makeshift table to weld on. Of course it didn't cover the entire top of the drum, so......

    After a few minutes I thought the Shovelhead primary cover I was welding on was really putting off a lot of heat, so I pulled the mask off and realized I had a fire in the trash can. Burned my hand a bit pulling the fiery SOB outside, no extinguisher in the shop then. There are two of them now, one by the welders and one by the grinder. We can be lucky, can't we?
     
  23. NAES
    Joined: Dec 24, 2008
    Posts: 485

    NAES
    Member

    Great attitude about how things sometimes go in the shop. Thanks for a quick life lesson!

    Sent from my SM-N910V using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  24. slowmotion
    Joined: Nov 21, 2011
    Posts: 3,276

    slowmotion
    Member

    At least you're making lemonade out of lemons, good for you. Be glad it wasn't a set of Halibrands, only option might have been to run like hell! :eek:
     
  25. sunbeam
    Joined: Oct 22, 2010
    Posts: 5,278

    sunbeam
    Member

    Now you can sell them for big bucks to the guy with a fiberglass car with simulated rust.
     
  26. Petejoe
    Joined: Nov 27, 2002
    Posts: 10,961

    Petejoe
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Zoar, Ohio

    Just last night was watching a show on HGTV.
    Couple decided to install a custom metal railing on a landing to the second floor.
    Next they showed a welder mig welding and fabbing it piece by piece right in the middle of the landing with sparks flying all over the house.
    I bet the next segment was on Chicago Fire.
     
  27. At least you have kept a good sense of humor about it. Sometimes we laugh to keep from crying.
     
  28. edwardlloyd
    Joined: Aug 2, 2003
    Posts: 2,067

    edwardlloyd
    Member
    from Germany

    Those mig sparks might look scary but they're so tiny they lose their heat almost immediately. Damn things go down my shirt and socks so often. Looks like I have moths in my closet. But the pain is over in a second. I guess that rubber foam stuff must have been very flammable. Normally I can weld right next to paper towels and they rarely catch fire. When they do you can just pat out the fire. That foam goes up like gasoline. It's the stuff some folks put in their cars as sound deadener. The slightly rubberized black foam sheet. Don't use it in cars. And check there's none of it in your shop or home.

    Sent from my SM-G935F using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2017
  29. BJR
    Joined: Mar 11, 2005
    Posts: 6,998

    BJR
    Member

    By the title I thought this was going to be another fake patina thread. Bummer about your wheels, thanks for posting.
     

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