Register now to get rid of these ads!

how to build a T bucket for under $3000 book

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by captainjunk#2, Nov 19, 2009.

  1. That's some great advice, Mr48Chev. As far as T-Bucket building today, inflation has actually been kind. According to the U.S. Government Inflation Calculator that $60 1972 frame would cost $307.95. So by being able to build it for less than $200 today you've beaten inflation by more than one-third! Still probably the best hot rod bargain going.
     
  2. ChestersAlive
    Joined: Nov 23, 2009
    Posts: 34

    ChestersAlive

    I would love to see photos of roadsters built using the book or parts of it, even if you no longer have them. The variety of construction ideas and personal touches could be of great interest to the people who have bought the book and are trying to decide what they would like on their own personal builds. Thanx............ Chester
     
  3. Dan
    Joined: Mar 13, 2001
    Posts: 2,356

    Dan
    Member

    I am going to build some headlight stands based on the ones in your book, if I get a chance I will post some pics, great book-
     
  4. OldCrow
    Joined: Jan 10, 2010
    Posts: 134

    OldCrow
    Member

    Love the E-book Chester. lots of good stuff in there. as far as the taper goes, the true "lo buck" trick is: before welding the tabs on the frame, heat the area around the hole red hot with a oxy torch. set the piece over an anvil hole. I keep an old tie rod end, still connected to a tie rod (makes a great handle) to stick in the hole and give it a couple heafty whacks with a hammer. forms the correct taper in the tab.

    Cheers,
    OC
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2010
  5. c-10 simplex
    Joined: Aug 24, 2009
    Posts: 1,331

    c-10 simplex
    Member

    The following is mostly for Chester's benefit:

    i'm probably the only one here and in the known universe to go the Library of Congress (ok, now you know where i live) and zeroxed the whole book. Sorry, Chester but i could not find the book when i needed it----i leafed thru it at a bookstore once and thought "this is a really good book," but, being the cheapskate that i am, i didn't buy it at the time. Then, when i needed it, i couldn't find it; All the bookstores i went to had no idea about it and where to get it. This was around 95-97ish.

    a) This shows you how well the book is written---that i would go to such extremes to find it. i thought the way things were explained was great and how you went into detail etc. i found the electrical section to be especially helpful. All books and magazines dealing with cars should be written this way!

    b) i'm probably the first and only patron of the library of congress to touch that particular copy of the book.

    c) Now that i know where to get a copy, i will buy one since i've lost most of the zeroxed pages anyways.

    Please write more books!
    Suggestions:
    How to adapt EFI to an engine.
     
  6. ChestersAlive
    Joined: Nov 23, 2009
    Posts: 34

    ChestersAlive

    OldCrow: Thats a fantastic idea, Thanks. Thats exactly what this blogs all about! Low budget ideas for low budget builds. It also shows not everyone is averse to using tie rod ends.
    c-10: It must have been the Motorbooks International edition, because the original was mailed out of a small garage by a small businessman(me). I never mailed one to the library of Congress and I doubt if they would spend the money to get one off the internet! The Wikipedia Library has an interesting summary of the two books tho. Thanks for the info and the compliments. I am writing two more books at this time, as I build the cars. Just as complete as the first. One is documenting the mounting of a 48-up Pickup to a passenger car frame, and the other mounting a pre-48 to a passenger car frame.
    As far as the EFI goes, thats out of my league, like Wall Street to a cowboy! If I don't know something (like uphostery) I won't hesitate to admit it.
    Chester
     
  7. ChestersAlive
    Joined: Nov 23, 2009
    Posts: 34

    ChestersAlive

    I made further developement on the radius rods after the book was printed. I welded 9/16 nuts on the back side of the brackets to give the tie rod ends a more substantial anchor, so that in time they could not wallow out the hole and wobble. I had a special tool for the taper, but Old Crows idea of heating would work on this set up as well. I also started cutting off 6" of the tie rod and welding this to the water pipe so that the end could be adjusted. This also allowed me to slide in an 8" length of cement rebar into the tie rod section, weld it, and then slide it into the water pipe for a stronger union when it was all welded. I use the rebar because it is easy to grind off the ridges until it will slide in easily for a snug fit. This also allowed you to grind the weld flush without weakening the unit so it didn't look like a snake swallowing a rat. The thing I didn't like about these radius rods was the top bar on the front was so visible, and it was ugly! Most of my customers replaced the tie rod ends on this bar with heim ends for appearance sake. They were a simple screw in swap. I guess 4 Heim ends were better than 16 though.
    Another tip: When building your frame, many times you need a small shim to level one piece to another before welding. A clothespin has 2 excellent wooden shims in it! Just an idea for when you need a shim for something................ Chester
     
  8. OldCrow
    Joined: Jan 10, 2010
    Posts: 134

    OldCrow
    Member

    As a matter of fact I just purchased some brand new tie rod ends on-line for ~ $7.oo each for the T currently under construction in my shop. the 36-48 ford ends are small, unobtrusive and inexpensive. I'm only using them on the frame end of the radius rods however, because the clevis that's available now is also very inexpensive and does look better out where they're more visable IMHO. and yes, I also weld a nut on the back of the tabs to give more purchase on the taper.
    I also found a guy who sells some water jet cut batwings, rear spring mounts and other suspension pieces that might look very familiar to you (Chester). the wings have a 5" span instead of 6, but otherwise look the same. the batwings were like 26 per pair. I can't make them this nice for that. perhaps there should be a sequel to the book for similar items that weren't available when the book was first written??

    Cheers,

    OC
     
  9. Tex-T
    Joined: Apr 29, 2009
    Posts: 22

    Tex-T
    Member

    Chester,
    It's great to hear from you! I have to tell you a story. I starting building a T-Bucket many years ago (late 70s). I was living in Colorado at the time, then moved to Virginia. I dragged all the stuff with me, steel body, engine, frame, etc. Well the project slowed, but I had seen an ad for your book "Bulid a T-Bucket for Under $3,000" in a rod magazine so I bought it. Well things took a turn and we moved to Texas. This time I sold the T-Bucket pieces to a friend and gave him the book to boot. I thought that was it, no more T-Bucket. Later on my wife passed away and I got remarried. We were at a car show and I saw a T-Bucket. The bug bit me again. We started talking about it and the next thing you know we found a glass body for sale. We dragged it home, and then started going to swap meets to gather parts. One day I said, I wonder if Earl still has the book I gave him and if he ever finished the T-Bucket? So I found his number and called. He said no I didn't get it finished and had sold it, but he said I still have that book you gave me. I don't know why I kept it. But I will send it to you! So I got my original copy back with my name it. Just as good of shape as when I gave it to him! I gotta tell you, I poured over every page. I've been working on the bucket for five years now and I'm almost finished. I've used most of your ideas and some of my own. It's been a fun build. Some of the stuff you talk about from the 80's isn't quite as cheap or easy to find anymore. Hey, it's hard to find a rear wheel drive car in the junkyards anymore! But my wife and I have had fun building and scrounging parts, going to swap meets, and meeting people. We have been to a couple of T-Bucket nationals, and plan to take our T-Bucket this year for the first time. Thanks for writing the book Chester. I've enjoyed it!
    Tex-T
     
  10. ChestersAlive
    Joined: Nov 23, 2009
    Posts: 34

    ChestersAlive

    Gasser 57: How 'bout the dog dick taillights on Post 103 ????..... Chester
     
  11. ChestersAlive
    Joined: Nov 23, 2009
    Posts: 34

    ChestersAlive

    In a recent discussion with Ted Brown (Originator of tthe CCR Roadster Plans) he said he wouldn't have power steering or power brakes on a street machine again. It seems his engine died on a corner and he had quite a hairy ride with no steering and no brakes. He made a good point! I used power disc brakes on the front of my roadsters with no power boosters. They balanced out good because the braking power is on the front, and full power would lock up the wheels. I installed one power booster (Customers orders) on a T, Mustang power discs, and the power booster mounted neatly below the floorboards. In a panic stop situation it worked fine IF you were going straight, but on a curve when the front dived and the rear lifted, it would spin the car around until the locked up wheels were in the back and you were headed into whatever caused the panic stop gas tank first, you second, with only an 1/8" of fiberglas between you and the tank. After that I refused to install boosters on my roadsters, if the customer wanted them they'd have to do it themselves.
    Ted had a good point on the steering too. In my book I refered to trashing the donor car power steering unit .............."A roadster needs power steering like Godzilla needs a bodyguard!" A roadster isn't a daily driver however, and I can't imagine driving my big heavy Apache without power steering and power brakes. It is a good point you need to think about when designing your rod. ........ Chester
     
  12. youngster
    Joined: Feb 26, 2006
    Posts: 533

    youngster
    Member Emeritus
    from Minnesota

    Just to add my 2 cents. Thanks to Goober for putting this all back out herefor all to enjoy. I am honored to have my plans for a ''T'' bucket chassis offered along with Chesters book.

    Ron
     
  13. pasadenahotrod
    Joined: Feb 13, 2007
    Posts: 11,776

    pasadenahotrod
    Member
    from Texas

    Now THAT is funny!
     
  14. ChestersAlive
    Joined: Nov 23, 2009
    Posts: 34

    ChestersAlive

    I see someone took off the pornagrafic pictures from post 103. At least some of you got to see what I was talking about before they dissapeared.
    ............... Chester
     
  15. fiki
    Joined: Sep 15, 2007
    Posts: 96

    fiki
    Member

    Just bought the book and heading off to print it out and bind it all together :)
     
  16. Fingers
    Joined: Feb 23, 2005
    Posts: 105

    Fingers
    Member

    Yep, that one got me too!
    I bought the E book on the weekend, great!
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2010
  17. ChestersAlive
    Joined: Nov 23, 2009
    Posts: 34

    ChestersAlive

    Damn! I LOVE hearing from Australia! Many of you there have the identical problems with parts availability I've found down here in Mexico. You should be particularly interested in my next two books in progress, they deal with updating and resto-rodding antique pickups like your international on a beer budget. Almost complete is mounting a 48 Jeep pickup on a 77 Chevy pickup frame, and includes complete directions for converting to a tilt front end. It's almost finished and should be ready for sale in the next few months. The other project is a 59 Apache mounted on a 78 Impala frame. 3" off the ground, smooth riding, and features 'GULL-WING' doors for under $100.They'll be available on the same website as the T-Bucket book.
    Later................... Chester
     
  18. butch27
    Joined: Dec 10, 2004
    Posts: 2,806

    butch27
    Member

    Damn:Chester , I didn't know you were in Mexico now. When do you think the statute of limitations will run out back her in the U.S.? LOL
     
  19. ChestersAlive
    Joined: Nov 23, 2009
    Posts: 34

    ChestersAlive

    Hi Butch, The statute of limitatons in the US runs out in 7 years, I've been here 10. But you're on the wrong track, in the upcoming book in the Rat Rod series,"How to mount an antique pickup body on a late model pickup frame" I've included a bonus 'More about the author' that explains my dissappearance for so long. I think you'll find it fascinating reading. Fortune and Glory with a beautiful woman at the end. Chester
     
  20. Freeland
    Joined: Oct 1, 2009
    Posts: 217

    Freeland
    Member


    May just have to do this... Over the weekend picked up a few pieces and looking for ideas and stumbled on to this thread... My ten bucks will be on there way here before days end... thanking you in advance for the experience...
     
  21. ChestersAlive
    Joined: Nov 23, 2009
    Posts: 34

    ChestersAlive

    I should make one thing clear, when I say 'Rat Rod', I'm refering to anything built by in a home garage on a beer budget. That doesn't necessarily mean rust and a black primer finish. One of the nicest things about a T-Bucket or A-Bone roadster is that you can see all the work, and nothing brings that out more than glassy finish paint. Not many of the working class people can afford to have things chromed at todays prices and not get divorced, so Bondo and paint come into the picture. The collage in my book brings out just how beautiful Bondo and paint can make a roadster. For me the best part of the day is when I've finished what I wanted to do and can take a few minutes sitting by my rod, drinking a beer, and admiring the work I've just completed, and thinking what I want to do next. This is what draws me to rod building.................... Chester
     
  22. captainjunk#2
    Joined: Mar 13, 2008
    Posts: 4,333

    captainjunk#2
    Member

    has anyone read a copy of this i see chester s new e book is out for $10 on web site New Chester eBook Hot Rod or Rat Rod Pickup
     
  23. captainjunk#2
    Joined: Mar 13, 2008
    Posts: 4,333

    captainjunk#2
    Member

    so i just bought and read chesters new book how to mount an old truck cab on a modern chassis , i thought it was as well written as his earlier work on building a T bucket for under $3000 , i enjoyed it, and it was cool to read what he had been up to since he wrote the last book , it was worth $10 bucks just to read for entertainment,
     
  24. 29AV8
    Joined: Jan 12, 2009
    Posts: 219

    29AV8
    Member

    Yea if you have lots of exrta money.which I dont. And you dont really enjoy building your own shit. then its ok to call speedway.:mad:
     
  25. ChestersAlive
    Joined: Nov 23, 2009
    Posts: 34

    ChestersAlive

    Thanks Cap, Glad you enjoyed Book 2. For T-Bucket fans who have completed their T-Buckets and miss working in the garage its a way to do what you love and make a few bucks when you sell it. There is a great demand for driveable, unfinished rods. Book 3 on the Apache will be out sometime in 2011. Its a study in custom bodywork I've learned in 50 years of doing it and can turn a layman into a professional customizer. You have several shots of it in Book 2. Chester
     
  26. ChestersAlive
    Joined: Nov 23, 2009
    Posts: 34

    ChestersAlive

    'Rooster Tails in the Fairway' Is there any interest in a book on how to install a VW beetle engine and 4-speed trans in a Club Car golf cart? There appears to be plenty of room. It would take it from 8 HP to 50 HP. Might not improve your game of golf but would definitely add some 'pizzazz' to a game of golf! Chester
     
  27. Hey Chester - just bought your new improved "How to build a T bucket" book. Big improvement as it's much easier to read. Well worth $5 US.

    Lots of relevant and useful stuff in there for any hot rodder.

    Thanks mate..... I can now load it up on my eBook reader.
     
  28. Thanks Blackjack for the compliments on the revised version.
    Just so nobody gets the wrong idea, the $5 price is what previous purchasers like you pay for the updated version -- which won't be released to the general public until this weekend. At that time, though, the 258 pages will be well worth the wait and the $14.99 price.
     
  29. Very sorry - I didn't make it clear that I was taking up the generous previous purchaser discount.

    However, $14.99 for the new buyers is still well worth the price having regard to the improved readability and all the great information and techniques in there.

    Chester's asides and general advice on women, life and booze are just an added bonus!!!
     

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2020 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.