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Technical How do you "peak" a hood?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by ekimneirbo, Jun 10, 2020.

  1. ekimneirbo
    Joined: Apr 29, 2017
    Posts: 1,120

    ekimneirbo
    Member
    from Brooks Ky

    One of my projects is a 49 Chevy truck.I plan to chop the top a couple inches and section the hood to reduce the bulbous nose. I would also like to have a small peak in the hood. I ran across a picture of one this morning and the builder had done a beautiful perfect job. The hood as it comes from the factory is a two piece hood, so there is a flange in the center and a metal strip. That is what seems to make putting a peak in the hood much more difficult. Any suggestions on a good way to peak a hood like this?
     
  2. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 15,527

    alchemy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Slice a three inch section out of the center of the hood, and weld in a three inch strip of steel with a peak bent into it.
     
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  3. Automotive Stud
    Joined: Sep 26, 2004
    Posts: 4,040

    Automotive Stud
    Member

    I'd bend up a piece of round stock to fit the stock contour and weld it over the seam.
     
  4. 41rodderz
    Joined: Sep 27, 2010
    Posts: 4,725

    41rodderz
    Member
    from Oregon

    Agree with above^^^ take the piece of metal and make a form for the shape you want , stick in a vise and hammer form the peak . Metal finish and weld in careful to avoid warping either piece.
     
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  5. oldolds
    Joined: Oct 18, 2010
    Posts: 2,971

    oldolds
    Member

    If you choose to use the rod method be aware that one side of the hood will warp down and the other side will warp up. With the flanges and the metal rod in the way you will not be able to shrink the metal back to the correct place.
    Don't ask me how I know this! I will say though that it is hard to find a nice hood when you need one!
     
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  6. lostone
    Joined: Oct 13, 2013
    Posts: 1,213

    lostone
    Member
    from kansas

    A good friend of mine and my boss did this just over a year ago on a 40 ford truck and one cool little trick they used was to set up one of those leveling lasers side ways and find front center of the truck and hood and then point the laser down the hood.

    They used the laser to keep the peak dead straight down the hood as they tacked it in place and then again when they did the finish body work down the peak before painting. That peak is dead center and dead on straight.

    I was impressed by their ingenuity !!
     
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  7. rockable
    Joined: Dec 21, 2009
    Posts: 2,912

    rockable
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I took a 3" wide strip of 18 gauge, bent it 90 degrees and then flattened it in my press. Also, since my Buick hood has a trough in it for the center chrome piece and, since I don't want to slice a piece out of the middle and attempt to buttweld it, I am going to use automotive panel adhesive to glue it in and then use AllMetal to smooth it. Also, I JB Welded some #10 machine screws to the backside to pull it down and hold it in place while the glue sets up.

    0227200830a.jpg 0227200830.jpg
     
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  8. OLDSMAN
    Joined: Jul 20, 2006
    Posts: 2,424

    OLDSMAN
    BANNED

    The 42 coupe I’m building for my daughter I used a piece of rod, but you have to be very careful about warpage on the sheet metal
     
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  9. gene-koning
    Joined: Oct 28, 2016
    Posts: 1,828

    gene-koning
    Member

    I really screwed up the original hood on my 48 Plymouth coupe by welding a rod down the center. Originally it was a 2 piece with a molding down the center, that allowed rain to get into a motor. I'm a welder by trade, I thought I could control the warp. I was really wrong. I was also wrong when I thought I would be able to remove much of that warp.

    This year, while I had the car apart, I removed large pieces of filler almost a 1/2" thick. Then I cut about 3" out of the center, and attempted to remove the warp out of both hood sides (mildly successful), then I weld the center piece in. Lets say its much, much better then it was, but there is a lot more filler in the hood then I would like.

    As said before, good hoods are hard to find, then I'd have to try to fill the seem again. I think Rockable's method is probably a better method then trying to weld it together. Gene
     
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  10. OLDSMAN
    Joined: Jul 20, 2006
    Posts: 2,424

    OLDSMAN
    BANNED

    Here is a picture of the 42 Chevy hood that I peaked with a rod 490BF34A-E533-406C-B6A6-DF023E3234E5.jpeg
     
  11. Warpspeed
    Joined: Nov 4, 2008
    Posts: 528

    Warpspeed
    Member

    Would spot welding work ?
     
  12. 19Fordy
    Joined: May 17, 2003
    Posts: 6,815

    19Fordy
    Member

    Cutting down the center of your hood will open a can of "warping" worms.
     
  13. OLDSMAN
    Joined: Jul 20, 2006
    Posts: 2,424

    OLDSMAN
    BANNED

    I wouldn’t spot weld it won’t be stable enough to keep any filler in place. Also will leave a place to trap moisture.
     
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  14. 19Fordy
    Joined: May 17, 2003
    Posts: 6,815

    19Fordy
    Member

    Many years ago (1965) I peaked the hood on my 53 Chevy using fiberglass cloth and Bondo.
    Lots of work but, it came out good and never cracked or flaked. I bet today's improved
    body filler, like All Metal, would work very well. Give that a try first before you start
    cutting, welding and warping. No one will ever know the difference.
     
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  15. chopolds
    Joined: Oct 22, 2001
    Posts: 5,743

    chopolds
    Member
    from howell, nj
    1. Kustom Painters

    Jersey Mike was kind enough to supply me with a long piece of steel, with a nicely shaped bead in it, he made for his bead roller. Put a couple extra supports under the hood and went to town. It si NOT easy to control the warpage, but using TIG or gas, keeps the welds soft and easier to manipulate.
     

    Attached Files:

  16. LOL This is doable ^^^ it never occurred to me to do it this way.

    I usually use a piece of brake line or fuel line. Then lead or mud it after it is welded in place.
     
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  17. Never done it but I've heard if you use a hollow tube instead of a solid rod that will help the heat dissipate a little better.

    Sent from my SM-A205U using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
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  18. ekimneirbo
    Joined: Apr 29, 2017
    Posts: 1,120

    ekimneirbo
    Member
    from Brooks Ky

    All of these are very nice examples. ChopOlds, are those surface welds rather than butt welds ?

    Below are some pictures of a truck I like, but I also like a slightly more pronounced peak .
    Peaked Hood 1 001.jpg
    Peaked Hood 2 001.jpg
     
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  19. Many years ago I peaked my '40 Chevy hood with tubing by spot welding it. Finished it off with filler. It held up good but eventually I decided to strip it and louver it. I carefully removed the peak after punching the louvers. Had a little trouble with the center but got it back in shape reasonably well. When I finished it I made a bull nose out of two of the stock stainless trim pieces that goes behind the hood bird (or whatever it is). I joined the two pieces together with piece of aluminum shaped to fit tightly inside the trim. Looks good and I can't see the butt joint going down the road.

    Yes, welding the halves together is a pissy job!
     
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  20. Hnstray
    Joined: Aug 23, 2009
    Posts: 11,472

    Hnstray
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Quincy, IL

    @rockable and @ekimneirbo ......Several years ago I peaked the hood for my GMC AD series pickup attached by the method you mention. I first experimented with a short strip of metal to see how much it narrowed when I ran it through my bead roller to the depth of peak I wanted. Once I had that figured out. I sheared a long strip and went to work running it through the bead roller. It was very difficult to control the strip freehand. I ended up making a guide from a piece of angle iron and that solved that problem on the second try.

    I did tack weld the two halves along the joint, then used panel adhesive to a bond the beaded strip into the recess on the hood. A thin coat of body filler bridged the ‘seam’ of the strip to hood panel. I did tack weld the ends of the strip to the hood, front and rear.

    I may have some pics of the hood in primer, if I can find them. If I do, I’ll post here.

    Ray
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2020
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  21. rockable
    Joined: Dec 21, 2009
    Posts: 2,912

    rockable
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I thought about bead rolling it but the method I used produced a nice straight piece. I experimented with several scraps before I made the final piece and trimmed it to fit. I also used the shrinker to put a slight downward bend in it to follow the contour of the hood.
     
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  22. chopolds
    Joined: Oct 22, 2001
    Posts: 5,743

    chopolds
    Member
    from howell, nj
    1. Kustom Painters

    If you want to have any control of the warpage after welding, it must be a tight butte weld! On something flat like a hood, it's easy to get out of control, so I tack, hammer and dolly, tack, hammer and dolly. Keep it straight. Then do small stitches and hammer as you go along. Still had to use some filler, but less than 1/8".
     
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  23. ekimneirbo
    Joined: Apr 29, 2017
    Posts: 1,120

    ekimneirbo
    Member
    from Brooks Ky

    Did you make the strip bow to follow the front contour before beading it
     
  24. Hnstray
    Joined: Aug 23, 2009
    Posts: 11,472

    Hnstray
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Quincy, IL

    No, it was not necessary to do that. The curvature of the hood is a large enough radius that I could gently bend the beaded strip to follow with no visible change in shape.

    edit: I did this project probably ten years ago. What I am struggling to remember accurately is whether I made the strip wider than final dimension in order to better control it when bead rolling. I know I thought doing that would make trimming it to width more difficult, but just can't say for certain what I decided. In any case, that's really a relatively minor concern.

    Ray
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2020
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