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Hot Rods Hotrod semis for a car hauler

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by junkyardjeff, Jul 10, 2011.

  1. junkyardjeff
    Joined: Jul 23, 2005
    Posts: 8,231

    junkyardjeff
    Member

    I always wanted a B series Mack to put on a late model chassis for a car hauler but after seeing a few of them in videos on You tube I think it would be fun to use the original diesel and twin stick trans,I also seen some other trucks with Detroits which I thought were a not so good motor but after hearing them from the inside of the cab have a different opinion of them now. A 12V71 with straight pipes sounds great going through the gears but the cost to maintain those monsters are beyond most peoples budget if not using them to make money,I also seen a video of a 54 Frieghtliner cabover that had a twin stick that looked fun to drive but need to stay off You tube as its giving me too many ideas. I have a car I am trying to sell and if anyone came up with a running old road tractor to trade I would probably jump on it and drive the neighbors nuts.
     
  2. Graham M
    Joined: Apr 17, 2011
    Posts: 406

    Graham M
    Member
    from Calgary AB

    Contact transport companies, as they have older trucks they're selling for as little as $1k on up. Be careful for the very old stuff as its quite hard to find parts for it, and it doesn't make sense to use it from an economics perspective. I'd stick with a cummins if you can, as their indestructible. Thats what we have in our International (Cummins ISX, 525hp), and its just a fantastic engine. Both performance wise, budget & to work on. No job is too big working on that engine, its all just a breeze. And thats WHEN we have to work on it, which is very very rarely. The 80,000 mile oil changes are pretty easy too. ;)
    Check out this guys build
    http://forums.thepowerscene.com/viewtopic.php?f=20&t=52

    (If you can cut the immature crap in that thread, its an interesting build so far)
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2011
  3. junkyardjeff
    Joined: Jul 23, 2005
    Posts: 8,231

    junkyardjeff
    Member

    A local junkyard has a b series Mack long wheelbase dump that could make a good car hauler but someone robbed the front clip years ago and the motor has been exposed to the elements since,those old Mack motors had a nice growl that I like. If not a Mack a REO,Diamond T or other rounded cab truck would work,due to the truck being used for my personal use it would have to be put on a one ton chassis for me to afford it but if I were to find one that ran I would drive it around to the local car shows and cruise ins while planning the chassis swap.
     
  4. rond
    Joined: Aug 8, 2009
    Posts: 39

    rond
    Member

    This is a situation where you want to be sure to look before you leap. Initial costs can be low, but maintenance and repairs (like tires) can eat you alive. Also, here in the land of imprisoned governors, license fees are extremely high, and things like insurance and DOT regulations can really take the fun out of big truck ownership.
     

  5. Graham M
    Joined: Apr 17, 2011
    Posts: 406

    Graham M
    Member
    from Calgary AB

    ^ This. I like the old iron as much as the next guy, but having my CDL, I can say its not worth it in terms of maintenance. I'd spend a bit more and start with a good truck, then go from there. Rebuilds can get VERY VERY expensive when it comes to the big rigs.
    As in: to have our ISX rebuilt its about $20-25k. And thats *JUST* the engine. Then you have how many other components you have to worry about.
     
  6. and CDL
    unless you are a "Farmer" I was only too happy to sell the KW and start buying hot rods much less hassel

    and dont forget the ever present DOT fining you for infractions like plastic valve caps
     
  7. I picked up a 58 Mercury Cabover a few years ago (for free) with plans of making a car hauler out if it. I got it running real good, all the lights working, and pretty much roadworthy except for two things, the brakes and tires. After I priced out rubber for it, and the cost of brake parts, I pulled the 292 Y block out of it and sold the rest of the truck for $500.
    Big trucks = Big money!

    One day I would like to build a vintage car hauler, but in the meantime, I'd rather spend my money on my roadster:D.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Hdonlybob
    Joined: Feb 1, 2005
    Posts: 4,009

    Hdonlybob
    Member

    sweet !!


     
  9. badshifter
    Joined: Apr 28, 2006
    Posts: 3,396

    badshifter
    Member

    Keep in mind that the older rigs are being legislated off the road for emissions reasons. Some will be worth scrap value, but you won't be able to use it.
     
  10. gas pumper
    Joined: Aug 13, 2007
    Posts: 2,957

    gas pumper
    Member

    off the roads for emmissions when used for business.

    Most states have over 25 year old age for collector or antique plates.

    That's how I have my 1970 C-30 flatbed. Never been a problem and have hauled stuff around the east coast here with never being stopped for carrying anything in the bed.

    There's a lot of old trucks with Historic plates that show up at cruises and shows.
     
  11. junkyardjeff
    Joined: Jul 23, 2005
    Posts: 8,231

    junkyardjeff
    Member

    Since I would only use it to haul my vehicles to distant shows I would try to get historical plates for it,I wondered if left on the original chassis would I have to get a CDL even though it would be for personal use only.
     
  12. The key to building one of these older trucks is to stick the cab on a newer, 1 to 2 1/2 ton truck chassis of your preference, something big enough the cab doesn't look silly on it but small enough that tires and so forth don't cost a fortune. Then put a Cummins or other diesel in if you want to make lots of black smoke. For instance we have about a 1950 Mack on the lot that is small enough body-wise it would be fine on the same dually chassis the average rollback car hauler runs on.

    Also, after one local show I saw a very cut down Kenworth or other semi cab done hot-rod style - no fenders, channeled down low - that actually was smaller than the full size van I was driving at the time. That's another way to go.
     
  13. gas pumper
    Joined: Aug 13, 2007
    Posts: 2,957

    gas pumper
    Member

    C D L . Commercial driver license. That should mean if you are hauling for hire or getting paid to drive you are commercial.


    Look at them big ass motorhomes and toter-homes. No CDL required unless you hire a driver than he needs one.
     
  14. Ohio Rodder
    Joined: Dec 28, 2010
    Posts: 80

    Ohio Rodder
    Member

    Since your from the Dayton area I would suggest that you hit the truck show out at Youngs Dairy in Yellow Springs on August 6th. Nice little show, about 100 trucks show up each year. Some of them are rigs like you looking for, could be a great place for some guidence or leads!
     
  15. junkyardjeff
    Joined: Jul 23, 2005
    Posts: 8,231

    junkyardjeff
    Member

    I have attended that show for years and like it because some big trucks show up that are never seen anywhere else.
     
  16. Most states don't require you to have a CDL to operate a tractor trailer/ heavy straight truck so long as it is registered properly (RV or antique truck tractor, depending upon its age) and if you are hauling something that it is your equipment/ property. You'll also be able to bypass scales. Keep in mind that plenty of officers aren't aware of this. It will be helpful to contact your local ATHS (American Truck Historical Society) or other vintage truck association as they will have standard form letters that can be shown to officers if they stop you to question you about your cargo.

    You mention you don't like Detroits. If you were buying an old truck this is likely what I would suggest to you. Detroits are tough motors and relatively simple. A 6-71 is a great motor, easy to find parts for as well. There's no need for a 12v92, 12v71, 8v92 (silver 92), or 8v71 as parts will be harder to come by and its far more power than you need. A big thing is to get your gearing right to improve your mileage. If you happen to pick something up with 5.27 rears and a 4x4 boxes you'll never even touch deep-under and you'll watch your fuel guage go down. 3.36s with a 10spd. would turn some impressive mileage, especially if you keep it in direct, and a 10spd. is a simple transmission to run. I wouldn't really suggest a twin-stick set-up as, in all truth, you'd likely main-box it most of the time, and brownies can be a little harder to track parts for. If you went with a Cummins you'll want to look at a smaller one. Something like a big-cam is more power than necessary. A small bore or a triple-nickel would be a better choice for a toy hauler.
     
  17. junkyardjeff
    Joined: Jul 23, 2005
    Posts: 8,231

    junkyardjeff
    Member

    I just never understood those old Detroits,it seemed like they were going fast but not going anywhere and leaked oil out of any parts on the motor. I did like the sound of that 12v71 in the video with the straight pipes but that thing was loud and dont know if I could handle it on a long trip,those twin sticks looked fun in the videos but probably would get tired of them after a short time. I know nothing about these bigger trucks and never been around them so it would be something new for me.
     
  18. F&J
    Joined: Apr 5, 2007
    Posts: 13,221

    F&J
    Member

    Here's my 10 wheel when it was almost new. We were going to use it for the farm shows, hauling ag tractors.

    But My son switched hobbies and I need to find it a good home. I may put a Cummins in it, just to be able to sell it. It's in the classifieds.

    [​IMG]
     
  19. MikeyFIN
    Joined: Jul 10, 2011
    Posts: 23

    MikeyFIN
    Member

    I'm Trucker myself... or getting out of the profession, and tell you on a long haul the quieter the better + a good A/C , airseat and a sound system...
    Yes personally I've been looking at COE's as historical vehicles they get by with a lot of taxes overhere...otherwise the maintanence bills are what they are despite having personal knowledge of the stuff.
     
  20. busguy71
    Joined: Oct 25, 2006
    Posts: 121

    busguy71
    Member

    The simple answer is that the CDL license depends on the MGVW of the vehicle, 26,000 and under, you dont need a CDL. The only exception to that rule is that RV's are exempt.

    Example, my avatar truck <----- MGVW is 32,000 so no matter what it actually weights (about 10k empty) I'll still need my CDL to drive it.

    I'd like to modify the dump bed and make it into a car hauler someday
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2011
  21. gas pumper
    Joined: Aug 13, 2007
    Posts: 2,957

    gas pumper
    Member

    F&J, How did the fire truck museum in Windsor Locks miss that one?
     
  22. gnichols
    Joined: Mar 6, 2008
    Posts: 11,110

    gnichols
    Member
    from Tampa, FL

    Have you tried the COE and race car hauler threads here on the HAMB? Gary
     
  23. JimC
    Joined: Dec 13, 2002
    Posts: 2,240

    JimC
    Member
    from W.C.,Mo.

    A local custtom guy and a collision repair facility owner,built a car haauler on a motor home chassis.
    He used a 46 Ford cab over and 46 Ford p/u cab to give him a four door.
    To get the correct curvature for the roof, he utilized the roof of a 4door Chevy sedan.
    It may be seen anywhere in the USA, as he uses it for his vacations and when he might find a rebuilder, resalable, or other vehicle, he picks it up. His rig is equipped with 425 Olds engine and turbo 400 tranny, has air,pw steering&brakes, and swivel reclining seats.
    It is a customm, a car hauler, and vacation vehicle rolled in one. It might be seen hauling atv's in Colorado, or might be seen in DC sight seeing.
    Some of you may have seen it, it is a darker shade of yellow with black bed and running boards, has bright tool boxes(custom made) under the bed.
     
  24. junkyardjeff
    Joined: Jul 23, 2005
    Posts: 8,231

    junkyardjeff
    Member

    Are you going with regular truck license or historical?
     
  25. It wholly depends on the way the vehicle is used. If you were to build a hauler for the sake of hauling customer vehicles to and from locations it would be classified as a commercial vehicle and, if over a 26,000 GVW you would be required to have a CDL of the proper class. If, however, its used for personal use only, i.e. as a private vehicle, or if you used it for agricultural purposes you won't need the CDL. In the former case you'd need an antique/ collecter vehicle plate OR RV plate if its newer (a heavy semi truck can be registered as an RV if its being used for such purposes and is, again, exempt from the need for a CDL) or a farm vehicle plate in the latter case.

    The thing about the Detroits is they lack low-end torque unlike Cummins and especially CATs. If you shift it around 1,900rpm you should be keeping it in reasonable power. Again, if you don't plan on hauling much weight (i.e. a car or two to a show) a 6-71 will provide more than enough power unless you're pulling Red Mountain at 70,000lbs.. Though they're fairly loud engines, they can be kept relatively quiet. There is an old saying about Detroits: "They're all talk and ready to go in the city, but when you get them out in the country they won't put out."

    A period Cummins for a '50s to early '60s truck would be something like a 220, 262, 275, or 300 Cummins. These are all small-bore Cummins, 220 being naturally aspirated, a 262 was turbocharged, and 275 and 300 "Iron-Lungs" were supercharged. The only period CAT would be a 1673 or 1693 CAT, neither of which you want to mess with parts or repairs on unless you have some very deep pockets.

    A B-model Mack isn't a bad choice to build a hot-rod hauler from if you want to go with a "big" truck. Mack still carries some parts for the B-models. Parts can be found reasonably well on the whole.

    Hope this helps.
     
  26. 72IH
    Joined: Dec 22, 2009
    Posts: 115

    72IH
    Member

    Run a Mack engine if you want something different. Stay away from the triple nickel cummins. Most cummins engine are pretty reliable. Parts aren't too bad either for most models. Cat is very expensive but lots of low end torque, bad on fuel.

    Detroits are two stroke engines. They need to stay in the upper rpm range to make power like most two strokes. If you want Detroit power in a relatively small package> 6v92. Still a little heavy for what it sounds like you want but they have some good HP. They can also be easily modified. Add twin turbos no problem.

    Detroits had a lot of parts that could interchange. Injectors, exhaust manifolds, blowers, water pumps, the list could go on. Easy to build power on. Just don't use the little 53s. They didn't do much even with turbos. The inline sixes where prone to cracking heads and heating problems. The weird thing was is that the 12v71 shared the same heads as the 6-71. They didn't seem to have heat and head problems like the I-6 did.

    The draw back is unless you know diesel engines, more specific Detroit Diesels you wont want to try anything on your own. Adjusting the governor, setting up injectors and valves takes some knowledge.

    They are cheap and plentiful. A lot of surplus engines out there from fire dept. and military.

    The Detroits are no chumps either. There is a guy in a town down the road who set the land speed record in a highway truck with a 12v71. Pretty cool, wish I could find a web address for the thing.

    The last number in the series of detroit is cubes per cylinder. 53,71,92 even a 149 per cylinder. The original "Grave Digger" used to run a Detroit on kerosene when they first started "racing" (if thats what you call what monster trucks do)
     
  27. mgtstumpy
    Joined: Jul 20, 2006
    Posts: 9,094

    mgtstumpy
    Member

    What about this 5th wheeler combo? :D
     

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  28. junkyardjeff
    Joined: Jul 23, 2005
    Posts: 8,231

    junkyardjeff
    Member

    Something like that would be nice.
     
  29. 53choptop
    Joined: Mar 5, 2001
    Posts: 1,197

    53choptop
    Member

    Saw this one this past Saturday while driving the back roads of Austin, Texas, use to belong to a repo company in Jerrell. It's a pretty cool looking rig.
     

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  30. dirty4
    Joined: Mar 6, 2010
    Posts: 165

    dirty4
    Member

    junkyardjeff......here is one that needs to be saved. says it is a `58 with integeral sleeper. This would make a cool hauler. for sale check Missouri craigslist also come with an extra cab.
     

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