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home made tools and equipment...

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by kustombuilder, Jan 16, 2008.

  1. Brendan1959
    Joined: Jun 26, 2008
    Posts: 288

    Brendan1959
    Member

    Seeing as there have been some vices shown.
    Her is one I built some 25 years ago, only because one of my work mates who was a welder said I could not build one (I am an electrician) It has served me well I recommend brass soft jaws. Even though I can now afford a store bought version I see no need to replace it. And it has been abused no end.
    Brendan
    IMG_3839.JPG IMG_3840.JPG
     
    BradinNC, rumblegutz, Ulu and 9 others like this.
  2. bobbytnm
    Joined: Dec 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,429

    bobbytnm
    Member

    Isn't it amazing the thing we can do when someone says "you can't"??
    good job
    Bobby
     
    loudbang likes this.
  3. Brendan1959
    Joined: Jun 26, 2008
    Posts: 288

    Brendan1959
    Member

    I recall the hardest part was cutting the square (acme?) threads.
     
  4. cretin
    Joined: Oct 10, 2006
    Posts: 2,954

    cretin
    Member

    Nothing earth shattering here, but made this cam bearing tool for the flathead I'm working on.

    ImageUploadedByH.A.M.B.1458633434.276905.jpg
     
  5. gatz
    Joined: Jun 2, 2011
    Posts: 1,579

    gatz
    Member

    Very good work there, Brendan.

    How did you cut the acme threads?
    And, the nut ?
     
    whtbaron likes this.
  6. woodbutcher
    Joined: Apr 25, 2012
    Posts: 3,252

    woodbutcher
    Member

    :DHi Gat.Ahhhhhhhhhh.Very carefully?:rolleyes::p
    Good luck.Have fun.Be safe.
    Leo
     
  7. whtbaron
    Joined: Sep 12, 2012
    Posts: 573

    whtbaron
    Member
    from manitoba

    LOL... not the answer we were looking for. I know you can buy the ACME threaded rod, but I also would like to hear how he threaded the nut.
     
  8. ROADSTER1927
    Joined: Feb 14, 2009
    Posts: 2,906

    ROADSTER1927
    Member

    You can also buy the nuts, weld a tab on and WALLA! Gary
     
  9. bobbytnm
    Joined: Dec 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,429

    bobbytnm
    Member

    wow! I'm super impressed now. You cut your own acme threads? THATS dedication.
    Good job
     
  10. When a friend of mine was taking machinist classes at the local vo-tech in the mid 70's, he showed me one of
    his projects: an Acme threaded rod and nut, that when you set it upright the nut spun down the threads by gravity.
    I was impressed, wouldn't have believed it was possible. Said he threaded the rod on a lathe and made the nut on a mill and lathe.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  11. Brendan1959
    Joined: Jun 26, 2008
    Posts: 288

    Brendan1959
    Member

    How did you cut the acme threads?
    And, the nut ?[/QUOTE]

    Well as I said it was a while ago, however as an apprentice electrician I worked for an Australian car parts manufacturer REPCO in the maintenance team. They were keen on training so they had 2 apprentice training schools to train fitters and turners, this was in addition to the apprenticeship commission one day a week at trade school, I recall about 120 apprentices each year. Each fitting apprentice spent the first 12 month in full time training at one of the centres, and just so we were multi skilled, electrical apprentices got the first 6 months training as fitters.
    One of the projects we had to make was a bottle Jack, it had inside and outside, left hand and right hand, multi start square threads, I remembered just enough to make one for my vice. Its a shame no one does this level of training now .
    I still have the jack somewhere.

    Brendan
     
    charleyw, Speedys Garage and loudbang like this.
  12. blue 49
    Joined: Dec 24, 2006
    Posts: 1,408

    blue 49
    Member
    from Iowa

    When I went to trade school, one of our projects was a step shaft with, I think, five different diameters. Each diameter had to be single point threaded with a different type of thread, acme, buttress, left hand and I don't recall what else. When I was ready to turn mine in, the instructor told me he wanted knurled nuts for each, too. I still have it somewhere. I can't imagine doing one that long and have it come out good, though.

    Gary
     
    loudbang likes this.
  13. Brendan1959
    Joined: Jun 26, 2008
    Posts: 288

    Brendan1959
    Member

    Well as I said it was a while ago, however as an apprentice electrician I worked for an Australian car parts manufacturer REPCO in the maintenance team. They were keen on training so they had 2 apprentice training schools to train fitters and turners, this was in addition to the apprenticeship commission one day a week at trade school, I recall about 120 apprentices each year. Each fitting apprentice spent the first 12 month in full time training at one of the centres, and just so we were multi skilled, electrical apprentices got the first 6 months training as fitters.
    One of the projects we had to make was a bottle Jack, it had inside and outside, left hand and right hand, multi start square threads, I remembered just enough to make one for my vice. Its a shame no one does this level of training now .
    I still have the jack somewhere.

    Brendan[/QUOTE]
    Found it
    IMG_3845.JPG IMG_3843.JPG
     
    tb33anda3rd, RICH B and loudbang like this.
  14. 64 DODGE 440
    Joined: Sep 2, 2006
    Posts: 4,282

    64 DODGE 440
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from so cal

    Found it
    View attachment 3170883 View attachment 3170884 [/QUOTE]

    That's a nice looking unit. It deserves to be cleaned up and put on display.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  15. gatz
    Joined: Jun 2, 2011
    Posts: 1,579

    gatz
    Member

    Cutting ACME threads is not the easiest thing to do on a lathe. You can buy threading inserts for chasing the threads, but if you have to make your own threading tool, it's a bit of a challenge.

    As re the internal threads of a nut, that's even trickier to make the threading tool.
    However, there are taps for most common sizes of ACME internal threads....read $$

    A friend of mine got very good at threading L & R ACME screws on the same piece of Stress-Proof and the corresponding nuts out of Ampco 18. IIRC Ø5/8 to Ø1".....Not for the faint of heart.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  16. henry's57bbwagon
    Joined: Sep 12, 2008
    Posts: 677

    henry's57bbwagon
    Member

    As a machinist I made many Acme threaded shafts and nuts. No big deal when you have the equipment. Even fab'd triple start shafts and nuts.
     
    H380 likes this.
  17. archauto
    Joined: Oct 14, 2010
    Posts: 39

    archauto
    Member
    from Co

    Brendan, Nice 46 Ford!
     
  18. hotrod428
    Joined: Feb 7, 2007
    Posts: 293

    hotrod428
    Member

    McMaster-Carr sells the acme rod and the nuts, Fastenal might also.
     
  19. bobbytnm
    Joined: Dec 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,429

    bobbytnm
    Member

    Brendan[/QUOTE]
    Found it
    ][/QUOTE]

    Brendan,
    Thanks for the info and for finding the jack. Not too many in-house training programs like that anymore.
    Bobby
     
    loudbang likes this.
  20. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
    Posts: 37,032

    loudbang
    Member

    Jeeze and I thought we were doing good having to make a simple H puller out of bar stock at our school. :rolleyes:
     
    31Vicky with a hemi likes this.
  21. treb11
    Joined: Jan 21, 2006
    Posts: 3,684

    treb11
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I was shown this valve spring compressor today. made from a junk rocker arm
    valve spring tool.jpg
     
  22. Sporty45
    Joined: Jun 1, 2015
    Posts: 989

    Sporty45
    Member
    from NH Boonies

    Love it! The simpler the tool, the better. Especially when giving new life to junk parts. :cool:
     
  23. We had to make nice little (but useless) hammers for half the period and then spend the rest watching '50s driving safety films, you know, the kind with bloody, burnt, decapitated, etc bodies. I took the class so I could learn something; but found that in reality the powers that be "sentenced" the hoodlums (they got to make knives, brass knuckles, and other stuff like that) to Metal Shop and there were more of them than there was room for, thus the split period. But; I did learn how to kinda operate a lathe, shaper, mill, harden metals, etc.
     
  24. ago
    Joined: Oct 12, 2005
    Posts: 2,199

    ago
    Member
    from pgh. pa.

    Working as a machinist in a research laboratory, Every thing was different almost every day. You had to use your head to machine the parts. Acme threads was one of the simple projects.
     
  25. Dan Timberlake
    Joined: Apr 28, 2010
    Posts: 1,321

    Dan Timberlake
    Member

    ==========

    I wonder if that was multi start thread.
    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-AnwEQPl8NKg/VBeoCFZIG3I/AAAAAAAAA1E/2EJwr3EHSiY/s1600/multiStart.gif
     
  26. JC Sparks
    Joined: Dec 8, 2008
    Posts: 728

    JC Sparks
    Member
    from Ohio

    Over the years I have cut a number of acme threads ID and OD. Cut a few with double and triple leads. It's all in the setup. JC
     
  27. DDDenny
    Joined: Feb 6, 2015
    Posts: 15,058

    DDDenny
    Member
    from oregon

    My first machinist job out of school, the leadman gives me a print to machine some shafts with acme threads.
    I told him that I had never made acme threads before. He said "after today you won't be able to say that".
     
    saltflats, JOYFLEA and 6inarow like this.
  28. Ulu
    Joined: Feb 26, 2014
    Posts: 1,767

    Ulu
    Member
    from CenCal

    The guy that gave me the big vise got a hold of this cast iron Baldor bandsaw and a 1960s Craftsman drill press, all of which we are in the process of restoring with my homemade, lo-cost, junkyard de-rusting equipement: an old orange juice drum and some old copper tubing and bits of galvanized tin and bailing wire, plus my ancient battery charger.
    20160328_081445.jpg

    This is after a dip + the Jasco acid wash, scrubbed with a stainless steel brush. The base was a rusty mess but it still had a nice paint on the bottom once that dirt and rust was removed in my tank. If you like machinery, you just gotta love real old-fashioned cast-iron . . .
    20160326_084015.jpg

    The platten was as rusty as the other parts you see.
    20160324_075311.jpg

    Dipping the pole, or should I say, "the gratuitous pole dipping shot."
    20160328_084919.jpg

    Freshly greased, in plastic wrap. The arm and gearbox for the platten, plus fence and small bolts.
    20160327_160905.jpg

    Final burnishing on the Mighty Baldor.
    20160331_080743.jpg
    2016-03-31 08.50.43.jpg

    The head unit is next and then we start painting.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2016
    loudbang and JOYFLEA like this.
  29. atch
    Joined: Sep 3, 2002
    Posts: 4,798

    atch
    Member

    Tool to install grease seal; 8" ford axle:

    I don't have any way to take and upload pix, but here's what I did. I don't have any fancy installation tool and don't have a lathe to make one. I took a long (8" - 10") 3/8" grade 5 bolt, two nuts, and a stack of fender washers about an inch high. I put the washers between the two nuts at the end of the bolt. This gave me a tool with a long enough shaft to see that I had it aligned with the centerline of the axle housing. I just smacked it a few times with a ball peen hammer and the seal seated right in. Simple. Cheap (free; the parts went back into the fastener bins when done). Effective. And quick.
     
    loudbang and saltflats like this.
  30. bigheadbaxter
    Joined: Feb 18, 2007
    Posts: 229

    bigheadbaxter
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I'm sure this has been done before. Works well for cutting bolts to length on my band saw ImageUploadedByH.A.M.B.1460149751.779733.jpg ImageUploadedByH.A.M.B.1460149762.862808.jpg ImageUploadedByH.A.M.B.1460149772.378731.jpg
     

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