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home made tools and equipment...

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by kustombuilder, Jan 16, 2008.

  1. J. A. Miller
    Joined: Dec 30, 2010
    Posts: 1,594

    J. A. Miller
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Central NY

    Nice score Ulu!! If you go over to the Garage Journal, they have a big thread on Vises and could probably identify it for you.www.GarageJournal.com
     
    loudbang and Ulu like this.
  2. woodbutcher
    Joined: Apr 25, 2012
    Posts: 3,252

    woodbutcher
    Member

    :D Hi Ulu.Great score.That Baldor grinder is a real heavy duty piece of equipment.Should give you many years of great service.
    Good luck.Have fun.Be safe.
    Leo
     
  3. MrMike
    Joined: May 21, 2010
    Posts: 138

    MrMike
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    the vise has a Wilton look to it ,may want to start searching that.
     
  4. Ulu
    Joined: Feb 26, 2014
    Posts: 1,767

    Ulu
    Member
    from CenCal

    I think the vise is a foreign copy made from melted down SBCs and Fords. Still no marks found but the screw was not rusty inside, and the castings are massive. I stuck the jaw in the derusting tank this AM, for a preliminary dip. I'd say this vise sat in a pole barn for 30 years, but didn't see a lot of use. It's not beat-on, and there are only a few welding scars. It's sun-baked more than anything.

    The Baldor is as well, but it is so smooth! It takes forever to spin down.
    This is a my Columbian, bought some time after they went to China, so it's no prize.
    columbianvise.jpg
     
  5. Mart
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 4,441

    Mart
    Member

    Well, here's one from me.
    I had an idea in my mind to make a puller for perch bolts. I have some 32-34 type that need pulling. Now this is not an original idea, I saw a pic of one somewhere (maybe even in this thread), I looked but cannot find it to give credit to the original poster. Based on the theory that it is better to pull something that is tight rather than push, I gathered some parts together and started cutting and welding. One old u-bolt, heated and bent, a piece of threaded rod, a nut, some 40mm square tube and a couple of bits of angle.

    Cut, weld, drill grind..

    [​IMG]
    Hey presto a puller tacked together and tried on for size. The idea behind the u-bolt was to try and get the line of "pull" more in line with the centre line of the pin.

    There are a couple of slots on the inside of the tubes so it can fit over the perch protusions but remain nice and tight to resist splaying.

    I welded a couple of shallow u's across the bottom of each foot to locate better on the axle and fully welded it.

    [​IMG]
    Here it is having pulled the pin out an inch or so. I had applied heat, to maybe flashing to dull red momentarily as the torch passed over.

    Here is the puller and pin after a successful extraction.

    [​IMG]

    And a close up of the business end.
    [​IMG]
    The bits sticking out below the nuts are non functional, just happened to be already welded to the heavy wall tube I wanted to use.

    I was very pleased with how it went. The tool is quite strong and can exert a great deal of pressure. I wound it as tight as I dare and then applied some heat. What I hadn't realised is that it had already moved a little bit, and had I known that I would have just kept on winding, or still applied heat but not as much. There is a slight angular difference between the two "feet" to account for the bend in the axle. The outer leg may need thinning down to allow for a dropped axle.

    Anyway, it worked well, so I thought I'd share.

    Mart.
     
  6. 64 DODGE 440
    Joined: Sep 2, 2006
    Posts: 4,282

    64 DODGE 440
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from so cal

    Nice way to do it. As you said, pulling is far better than pushing.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  7. Fred D
    Joined: Dec 1, 2013
    Posts: 5

    Fred D
    Member
    from Houston

    Looks awesome
    Be careful
    The government may want you to change the name like they are trying to do to the sports teams

     
    Ulu, loudbang and slack like this.
  8. Ulu
    Joined: Feb 26, 2014
    Posts: 1,767

    Ulu
    Member
    from CenCal

    Well this thing was pretty Rusty and the stands are even worse. They're not going to fit in my de-rusting barrel.
    20160306_161420.jpg
    I ran the jaw of the vice in the De-rusting tank for two days, then took it out and scrubbed down with white vinegar and a brush.


    Finally I wiped it down with a fresh grapefruit, rinsed off in water, hung it up, dried with an air hose and squirted it down good with WD-40 rust preventative.
    20160307_061536-1.jpg
    Before.


    20160309_071243.jpg
    After.

    The body of the vise is in the de-rusting tank, and now bubbling away merrily.
    1457715356838-1360041034.jpg
     
    loudbang and bct like this.
  9. cowboyinachair
    Joined: Nov 17, 2010
    Posts: 352

    cowboyinachair
    Member
    from colorado


    what is in the de-rusting tank
     
  10. Ulu
    Joined: Feb 26, 2014
    Posts: 1,767

    Ulu
    Member
    from CenCal

    Find the thread on "electrolytic derusting" for the whole scoop, but basically its water and some washing soda; and you hook a battery charger up with the negative side on the rusty part and the positive side on some crap that's going to turn to rust in the bottom of the tank and disappear (your sacrificial anodes) let it run for a couple of days and take it out and scrub it down that's about all there is to it.

    I'm using some galvanized sheet metal as my sacrificial anodes because they make rust transfer very quickly (particularly in cold weather when you need a little help because the tanks chemistry tends to move slow in cold weather.)
     
    loudbang likes this.
  11. Ulu
    Joined: Feb 26, 2014
    Posts: 1,767

    Ulu
    Member
    from CenCal

    Thank you, J.A..
    I did go join, and they have some very unusual stuff to show off.

    BTW, no identifying markings whatsoever have been found on the vice so far.

    Pretty certain that this one came up from Mexico as the guy that owned it was a local Mexican farmer, or Vintner as he actually raised grapes.

    Which reminds me I got a case of grapefruit for free and I've been experimenting with grapefruit derusting. Right now all the nuts bolts and washers are stuck inside a particularly sour grapefruit. I'll let you know how it goes.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2016
    J. A. Miller likes this.
  12. cowboyinachair
    Joined: Nov 17, 2010
    Posts: 352

    cowboyinachair
    Member
    from colorado

    i looked but not thread
     
  13. gatz
    Joined: Jun 2, 2011
    Posts: 1,580

    gatz
    Member

  14. Ulu
    Joined: Feb 26, 2014
    Posts: 1,767

    Ulu
    Member
    from CenCal

    Sorry I couldn't remember the exact title but there are threads here on various methods of rust removal, and several of them touch on the electrolytic method as well.
     
  15. Ulu
    Joined: Feb 26, 2014
    Posts: 1,767

    Ulu
    Member
    from CenCal

    By the way, the grapefruit derusting idea was kind of a bust.

    If you boil the juice down and made it very strong and hot it would possibly work OK; but normal strength and cool temperatures result in a very slow action.

    Also it appears this method would be perfect if you wanted to build a Brown Bess musket and get that exact brown color on the steel.

    I think grapefruit would do the trick
     
  16. Jethro
    Joined: Mar 5, 2001
    Posts: 1,582

    Jethro
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Citric acid , which is the acid in grapefruits and lemons does work pretty good at derusting as well as removing mill scale. It can be purchased at home depot as a concrete etch. It is more environmentally friendly than other strong acids and disposal is easier.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  17. Ulu
    Joined: Feb 26, 2014
    Posts: 1,767

    Ulu
    Member
    from CenCal

    I think I might prefer the results of phosphoric acid on anything that's going to be black. It's more like the normal patina you'll get from anything that's acid etched from being handled by human fingers.

    Phosphates & such phosphorus "tailings" are not as environmentally friendly.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2016
  18. gatz
    Joined: Jun 2, 2011
    Posts: 1,580

    gatz
    Member

    This is a hoist I made some years ago. Original need was for restoring the A-C D17 tractor in the background at right.
    To get it low enough to get outside the shop door, and yet in some instances where it needs to clear a vehicles fenders or raise things up to get inside a pickup, I made it with 24" of vertical adjustment in 6" increments.
    A strap-type boat winch was mounted on each end to raise/lower the 2 1/2" sq tubes that slide inside the 3" sq uprights. The loop of strap goes under a roller bolted/pinned to the bottom of the 2 1/2" sq tubes.
    Pins are inserted at desired height. Casters have locks.

    Use it frequently and it works really well.
    Tho' intended to be rated for 2,000 lbs, I've lifted the whole rear-end of the tractor which had fluid filled tires .


    DGhoist.JPG
     
  19. GearheadsQCE
    Joined: Mar 23, 2011
    Posts: 2,761

    GearheadsQCE
    Alliance Vendor

    I like that! Adjustable everything.
     
  20. saltflats
    Joined: Aug 14, 2007
    Posts: 10,840

    saltflats
    Member
    from Missouri

    Okay you may not want to try this at home but I am always trying to make stuff with a stick and a rock because I don't have a mill so most of my work comes at the hands of a die grinder.
    So needing something to help shape parts by hand got me thinking that something to hold the die grinder would be of help so here is what I came up with.
    There was already a hole in my work bench so I found a peace of pipe that my small die grinder would fit in and welded to a peace of angle then bolted to my table and hooked out the grinder with a foot control and did some playing and would say it work pretty good.
    I used a board over the top so I can change the bit without removing the tool from the holder. 20160313_145723.jpg 20160313_145701.jpg 20160313_145846.jpg
     
  21. atch
    Joined: Sep 3, 2002
    Posts: 4,802

    atch
    Member

    Very cool; a router table for metal working...
     
  22. slack
    Joined: Aug 18, 2014
    Posts: 533

    slack
    Member

    Do it work pretty goood?
     
  23. saltflats
    Joined: Aug 14, 2007
    Posts: 10,840

    saltflats
    Member
    from Missouri

    Yes it does
    Its just like by hand it just cuts one direction
     
    loudbang likes this.
  24. Legendlives
    Joined: Mar 4, 2016
    Posts: 203

    Legendlives

    Wanted to make a new rear hugger for my 'bike, so made this 'English Wheel' from scrap. Made from some cut-up frame parts, a steel castor, two clutch release bearings and a big bit of studding with nuts. Works really well!
    [​IMG]
     
  25. GearheadsQCE
    Joined: Mar 23, 2011
    Posts: 2,761

    GearheadsQCE
    Alliance Vendor

    Can we see your 'rear hugger'?
    You can't imagine what I'm imagining!:eek:
     
    bigheadbaxter likes this.
  26. Ulu
    Joined: Feb 26, 2014
    Posts: 1,767

    Ulu
    Member
    from CenCal

    They don't call him "Old Ironpants" for nothing.
     
  27. Love what you've done with this
     
  28. niceguyede
    Joined: Jan 19, 2009
    Posts: 633

    niceguyede
    Member
    from dallas

    I spent a couple of hours today building this door dolly attachment for one of my jacks. I'm going to add another hole about half way down the legs for heavy doors. Best thing is it folds up small enough to fit between my toolbox and cabinet.

    Posted using the Full Custom H.A.M.B. App!
     

    Attached Files:

    saltflats likes this.
  29. niceguyede
    Joined: Jan 19, 2009
    Posts: 633

    niceguyede
    Member
    from dallas

    I should have said the best part is it was all stuff I had in the garage. An old masking paper machine that my last job was throwing away. Some kind of folding shelf that was trashed, but it is 1/8th inch plate. And a couple of spare nuts and bolts. Free is always the best part!

    Posted using the Full Custom H.A.M.B. App!
     
  30. DDDenny
    Joined: Feb 6, 2015
    Posts: 15,059

    DDDenny
    Member
    from oregon

    Rollover contraption.
    For finishing underside of my roadster.

    20160315_095823.jpg 20160315_100342.jpg
     
    RICH B, loudbang and saltflats like this.

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