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home made tools and equipment...

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by kustombuilder, Jan 16, 2008.

  1. Dan,
    Great work! What type of dies do you use to do the flames? I assume they are stepping dies, but how do you get the tight points on the tip of the flames? I currently have an old Pexto roller with a set of beading dies, but hope to make some more dies for it soon.
     
  2. Thanks Mtw fdu,
    I figured that the dies had to be pretty thin to get the fine points at the ends of the flames. Lazze makes it look so easy!

    I'll have to see what my dad has laying around for round stock the next time I visit him, and try to make some new dies for my roller.
     
  3. No worries...happy to help where I can.

    Speaking of dies...here is a pic of the ones I made for my bead roller.

    Mtw fdu.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. Nice! My dad has a lathe and I will be checking out his metal stock when I visit this week. ;) Just not sure how to get keyways cut in the dies, might have to take the dies to a machine shop after I make them. Do you need to use any particular type of steel for the dies?
     
  5. All I have done is used normal bright bar for my dies. I have in the past also harden them. I have also just used them straight from being machined up without hardening them at all and they are fine, I have not had any trouble with rolling beads.

    Mtw fdu.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2014
  6. niceguyede
    Joined: Jan 19, 2009
    Posts: 633

    niceguyede
    Member
    from dallas

    Delrin makes for some decent dies. There was a tech tread on lathing dies with a profile plate which works great with delrin. They don't last nearly as long as metal, but using profile plates to cut em they are cheap and easy to make new ones.

    Sent from my LG-P769 using H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  7. saltflats
    Joined: Aug 14, 2007
    Posts: 10,737

    saltflats
    Member
    from Missouri

    I purchased one of those HF soda blasters and wanted a cabinet to blast some parts in and sense I shot my wad on the blaster I put together a cabinet out of a cardboard box. I used bed rail frame for the legs had a light out of a cigarette display case some lexan a buddy gave me and hooked up my Kirby vacuum and there you have it.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. porsche930dude
    Joined: Jan 5, 2008
    Posts: 268

    porsche930dude
    Member

    I put together this little gadget for turning the dials on Warn Locking hubs for my old Jeeps. They get real stubborn in cold weather. Works great! The gear part is some transmission part i picked up off the ground at the junk yard
     

    Attached Files:

  9. plym49
    Joined: Aug 9, 2008
    Posts: 2,797

    plym49
    Member
    from Earth

    Show off! A Snap-On cardboard box! Some of us can only afford HF cardboard. ;)
     
  10. saltflats
    Joined: Aug 14, 2007
    Posts: 10,737

    saltflats
    Member
    from Missouri

    I am just glad I didn't have to buy what came in it.
     
  11. chevy3755
    Joined: Feb 6, 2006
    Posts: 1,044

    chevy3755
    Member

    I like that comment plym49.............
     
  12. Merlin
    Joined: Apr 9, 2005
    Posts: 2,546

    Merlin
    Member
    from Inman, SC

    Nice wish I had something like that when I had my Jeep, Those Warn hubs can be a pain sometimes.

    Posted using the Full Custom H.A.M.B. App!
     
  13. olcarguy
    Joined: Mar 23, 2008
    Posts: 85

    olcarguy
    Member

    Let us know how well the blaster works.....do you think it will sand up......
     
  14. atch
    Joined: Sep 3, 2002
    Posts: 4,755

    atch
    Member

    yuk, yuk, yuk
     
  15. patterpillar
    Joined: Jun 16, 2013
    Posts: 83

    patterpillar
    Member
    from Montana


    keyway broaches work well and are reasonably priced
     
  16. Brendan1959
    Joined: Jun 26, 2008
    Posts: 288

    Brendan1959
    Member

    If you have a lathe and some time it can be done by grinding a lathe tool to the size you want the key way to be, set the tool at exactly centre height in the lathe, almost parrallel to the bed, you need a tool to be longer than the depth of the bore of the item to be keyed. Then you wind the tool in and out of the item to be keyed taking a couple of thou on each pass. Slow but I have done it and it worked fine.
    Brendan
     
  17. I have 2 sets of keyway broaches (metric and imperial sets) which I use now. I used to use my mill. It was very slow but it worked ok. Back then I didn't do many but now I do them all the time. I made a keyway broach press using a air over hydraulic ram and foot pump. It only take a few seconds to cut a keyway now.

    I actually got the design of it on Youtube and modified it to suit my needs. Here is a pic of it.

    Mtw fdu.
     

    Attached Files:

  18. willo_96
    Joined: Nov 5, 2013
    Posts: 78

    willo_96
    Member

    Got any more pics and info on that home made broach press?
     
  19. @willo_96

    That is the only pic I have of it. Just to give you some info...I got the ram and air over hydraulic kit from Speedwerx it cost around $1000. I got the bracket kit as well which was $60. I actually got 2 complete sets as I am also changing my louver press to air over hydraulic ram. It has a hydraulic ram from a porta power set up on it now and am changing it over soon...1 of many tools I have made and use frequently.

    The measurements I made to suit myself but you can do anything you like. There is not much to tell otherwise if you can zoom in on the pic above for details.

    Hope this helps.

    Mtw fdu.
     
  20. ago
    Joined: Oct 12, 2005
    Posts: 2,199

    ago
    Member
    from pgh. pa.

    You can use a manual arbor press for key-way broaching also. It helps to use different shims to ease it through to finish.


    Ago
     
  21. Mike Rouse
    Joined: Aug 12, 2004
    Posts: 365

    Mike Rouse
    Member

    I built this a few years ago. It can punch 3" and 4" traditional louvers.
    It uses a toggle to exert the force. Very easy to use. I have punched hundreds of louvers with it. It is large enough to put a '40 Ford hood in it.
    All was designed and fabricated by me including the dies.
    Mike
     

    Attached Files:

    RMFH and Ulu like this.
  22. Thanks patterpillar, Brendan, and Mtw fdu.

    I figured that there had to be a way to do it without a milling machine, but wasn't sure. It's been over 30 years since I have done anything other than basic turning on a lathe, so I have a lot to learn. Dad doesn't use the lathe any more, so I will probably be bringing it home the next time I drive out to see him.
     
  23. oldgoaly
    Joined: Oct 22, 2004
    Posts: 561

    oldgoaly
    Member

    When I make dies for my bead roller or collets for the pullmax I use my Springville hydraulic arbor press, this thing is sweet! Hiball rebuilt the hydraulics. Real good feedback on the pressure while broaching. If you find one cheap.... buy it!

    broaching001.jpg

    I have it on a bench now, could not wait to use it once I got it back in the shop. unloaded it on to the barrel jack rolled it into the shop put it to work!
     
  24. I have got a 14 inch stroke on the ram I have on my keyway broach press. Saves a lot of time not having to use a piece of bar when the stroke runs out and there is still part of the broach not through enough.

    My louver press has only a depth of 360 mm. I am going to make it able to be turned 90 degrees so I can do longer pieces...just have to find the time at the moment!!

    Here is a pic of it now with a porta power ram on it. I will be putting a ram with a 14 inch stroke and a air over hydraulic foot pump...just will make the job of pressing louvers a lot quicker.

    Mtw fdu.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Feb 22, 2014
  25. VoodooTwin
    Joined: Jul 13, 2011
    Posts: 3,455

    VoodooTwin
    Member
    from Noo Yawk

    Nothing to write home about, but here's something I just cobbled together out of scrap steel and a discounted "open box" 12-inch disk sander....cleans up edges real nice. My favorite new shop tool.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  26. Fitty Toomuch
    Joined: Jun 29, 2010
    Posts: 248

    Fitty Toomuch
    Member
    from WVa

    I have plans to build just such a deal, although I salvaged a large aluminim disc off a foot powered potters wheel, mounted to a large shaft with pillow block bearings. If it could be mounted direct to motor like yours would be best,"space saving"
    Fine job. what rpm is that motor?
    Great thread and alot of talent on board.
     
  27. VoodooTwin
    Joined: Jul 13, 2011
    Posts: 3,455

    VoodooTwin
    Member
    from Noo Yawk

    It's a 1700rpm motor. Great tool to have, for sure.
     
  28. olcarguy
    Joined: Mar 23, 2008
    Posts: 85

    olcarguy
    Member

    Just be careful, it will take the end almost off of a finger pretty quick......don't ask how I know.....:(
     
  29. inkstain27
    Joined: Feb 8, 2006
    Posts: 500

    inkstain27
    Member

    I know first hand how, haha
     

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