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home made tools and equipment...

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by kustombuilder, Jan 16, 2008.

  1. I meet Kris Elmer at B'ville this year and got a look at his homemade speed parts. Well I dusted off is GREAT tech post about casting your own bellhousing, and I've started building a refactory furnce from an old air tank. Can't wait to start casting.
     
  2. big_jae
    Joined: Apr 22, 2010
    Posts: 53

    big_jae
    Member

    love this thread.....keep em comming
     
  3. gatz
    Joined: Jun 2, 2011
    Posts: 1,540

    gatz
    Member

    When using HotHeads adapter for 331hemi-to-727xmsn, there's very little room to get at the torque converter bolts. In fact, it's near impossible from the bottom area; so the next best place is where the starter mounts. Even then, I couldn't get the bolts started. (dexterity and fingers not being what they used to be)

    Had a piece of heavy banding material laying around. I think it was 1" wide and fairly thick. Made a notch in one end that held the bolt firmly and made a slight bend about 1 1/2" down. With the bolt in the notch, I fed the "guide" down through the starter opening, then held onto it while using the other hand to start the bolt. When it was turned a few revs, the handle was pulled down and out of the way for a short socket.

    The notch can be done by drilling a hole first, then snip the middle out; as long as the result will capture the bolt but not too hard, so that it can still be turned. Helps alot to buck the material while drilling.

    BTW.....There was only one position for the 4 holes of the flex-plate and TC to line up. Best to establish this and mark somehow beforehand; else be cussing like a sailor.
     

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    Last edited: Nov 7, 2012
  4. frankinplymouth
    Joined: Sep 6, 2008
    Posts: 354

    frankinplymouth
    Member
    from oregon

    At Good Will found some heavy Aluminum cast bowls. Ground the bases off and mounted them to plywood bases. Neet shaping dollies for aluminun and light steel, Ray
     

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  5. 64Cyclone
    Joined: Aug 30, 2009
    Posts: 1,496

    64Cyclone
    Member

    People say the HF model has 22mm shafts and a 3/8" thick main body. I can only go by what I've read about the HF models, but the Woodward I have has 25mm shafts and a 1/2" main body.

    A member here is going make me a stg wheel adapter and he may make more for people who have China bead rollers they're modifing. I'll leave it up to him if he wants to post about it but personally I'd rather have an adapter to mount a stg wheel and keep the hand crank.
     
  6. dabirdguy
    Joined: Jun 23, 2005
    Posts: 2,404

    dabirdguy
    Member Emeritus

    Yes, THE HF beadroller is 22mm shafts.
     
  7. rouye56wingnut
    Joined: Jan 14, 2008
    Posts: 352

    rouye56wingnut
    Member
    from mn.

    Here is an Ewheel I made about 3 years ago and I keep adding to it. I have both the upper and lower wheels on dovetails as well as the height can be adjusted up or down as they too are on dovetails . I also came up with an air opperated lower post devise for changing the anvils and releasing a panel that has a flange . Alot quicker and easier than letting go of the panel to manualy releasing . Today I made tool holders for the anvils and extra holders ,but need to send them to the powder coater .Tired of having wheels spread out all over the place .
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  8. Dyce
    Joined: Sep 12, 2006
    Posts: 1,906

    Dyce
    Member

    Works good Dan but it was ment to be a simple machine lol... Don't make a rack for my 1" wheels yet. Forgot them again..... I don't think most members on the HAMB know just how much Dan and his wife Lou give to support the metalshaping comunity. 2 times a year they host a metalshping gathering that rocks!!! Thanks Dan for all you do, and your wheel works great.
    Jeff
     
  9. inthweedz
    Joined: Mar 29, 2011
    Posts: 422

    inthweedz
    Member

    This gadget may be too simple for this thread, but here is my offering..
    I dont know about the rest of you, but I always have a problem of holding two wires, solder and the gun with only two hands, so I made this easy helper to do half the job. Its is a couple of aligator clips, spaced about 1'' apart, soldered onto a curved ( U shaped) piece of 1/8'' bronze welding wire, each clip holds the wire ends to be soldered, where I want them, absorbes excess heat when soldering diodes etc. and dosen't move until you let the clips go.:)
     

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  10. DocsMachine
    Joined: Feb 8, 2005
    Posts: 279

    DocsMachine
    Member
    from Alaska

    -You know, if you filled those with concrete or something, they'd stand up to heavier use. Just an idea.

    Doc.
     
  11. rusty addiction
    Joined: Apr 3, 2011
    Posts: 73

    rusty addiction
    Member

    It may be simple, but as soon as I make one it will be one of the most important tools in my eletcrial box. Thanks for posting.:)
     
  12. fitzee
    Joined: Feb 26, 2003
    Posts: 2,862

    fitzee
    Member

    how in the hell did I not ever think of this!!Cool..
     
  13. GearheadsQCE
    Joined: Mar 23, 2011
    Posts: 2,711

    GearheadsQCE
    Member

    I will make 4 as soon as I get out into my shop. One for me and each of my sons and son in-law.

    By the way, you forgot to put the shrink tube on first.
     
  14. dabirdguy
    Joined: Jun 23, 2005
    Posts: 2,404

    dabirdguy
    Member Emeritus

    Genius is usually simple stuff no one else could see.
    Sweet!
     
  15. Jim Stabe
    Joined: Oct 31, 2008
    Posts: 179

    Jim Stabe
    Member

    Just an idea you might want to consider - I used to have a steering wheel on the gear end that I was able to use by dis engaging the spool on the winch motor but I found it was a little awkward reaching over and trying to feed the work at the same time. I recently slowed the feed rate down by installing a 48 tooth sprocket on the shaft replacing the 29 tooth that I had before giving me 6 - 7 rpm vs 11-12 rpm. While I was doing that I used the 29 tooth and a 15 tooth I had extra to move the handwheel closer to the rollers. It is much easier to use that way. The extra sprocket had a 1" bore so that is the shaft diameter I used and mounted it in a couple $9 pillow blocks from Northern tool. The 29 tooth sprocket was already mounted to the bead roller shaft so I just bolted the 48 tooth to it. Whether you motorize or not, having the wheel closer to the work makes the machine much easier to use.

    Bead roller mods 004.jpg

    Bead roller mods 002.jpg

    Bead roller mods 003.jpg

    Bead roller mods 007.jpg
     
  16. inthweedz
    Joined: Mar 29, 2011
    Posts: 422

    inthweedz
    Member

    Hey gearheadsQCE.. I thought I'd get away without anyone spotting the heat shrink missing, But this wiring was scrap, I had to use something for the pic.. :)
     
  17. GearheadsQCE
    Joined: Mar 23, 2011
    Posts: 2,711

    GearheadsQCE
    Member

    Can't tell you how many times I finished the last wire in a bundle and realized that I forgot the ST.
     
  18. inthweedz
    Joined: Mar 29, 2011
    Posts: 422

    inthweedz
    Member

    Yeah, find it lying on the bench after you do a perfect solder joint, or put it on the wire too close to the heat, only to find its shrunk and cant be moved.. Lol. :(
     
  19. olcarguy
    Joined: Mar 23, 2008
    Posts: 85

    olcarguy
    Member

    Old screw driver bits are high carbon steel and make good center punches....
    Modified vice grips to go over larger flange...
    My welding cart, has 2 110v receptacles fused separately. Power comes from the welder supply. If you don't understand how this is done don't try it ....get help.
     

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  20. vendetta
    Joined: Mar 22, 2007
    Posts: 125

    vendetta
    Member


    yip i'm stealing this idea too.great idea-cheers for posting!
     
  21. rouye56wingnut
    Joined: Jan 14, 2008
    Posts: 352

    rouye56wingnut
    Member
    from mn.

    I made new storage areas for wheels and accesories
     

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  22. GearheadsQCE
    Joined: Mar 23, 2011
    Posts: 2,711

    GearheadsQCE
    Member

    Really like your 'Slap-on' decals!
     
  23. Caddy-O
    Joined: Aug 8, 2006
    Posts: 1,645

    Caddy-O
    Member

    Here are some jigs that I made to drill out broken exhaust bolts.

    I'm sure they would work for other applications where the bolt is broken flush with the surface.

    Here's how I use them for broken manifold bolts:

    1. Remove exhaust manifold

    2. Tap a thread in the manifold hole to match jig thread

    3. Re-install manifold

    4. Screw jig into threaded hole

    5. Drill through broken bolt

    6. Repeat process with graduating hole sizes in your jig until most of the seized bolt is removed.

    7. Chase the hole with tap.

    8. Yo, problem solved (vanilla ice)
     

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  24. Jim Stabe
    Joined: Oct 31, 2008
    Posts: 179

    Jim Stabe
    Member

    Now that is pretty damn clever!
     
  25. atch
    Joined: Sep 3, 2002
    Posts: 4,695

    atch
    Member

    as jim said: "pretty clever."

    question - how did you drill the bolts to make the jigs? mill?
     
  26. Caddy-O
    Joined: Aug 8, 2006
    Posts: 1,645

    Caddy-O
    Member

    Used a metal lathe to make these...but you could probably find the center on the bolt head and drill it with a drill press...
     
  27. 270dodge
    Joined: Feb 11, 2012
    Posts: 742

    270dodge
    Member
    from Ohio

     
  28. Dawai
    Joined: Oct 1, 2007
    Posts: 263

    Dawai
    Member
    from North Ga.

    Good idea,
    Okay.. I am confused as normal.. if you have a metal lathe, why tap the manifold? why not make a dowel that is a press fit in the exhaust manifold hole?

    That would be like a tapping block to hold the drill-tap square to the face of the work.

    Gun-drilling on a lathe is a art in itself, getting a straight hole that does not wander as you drill, A resharpened bit is a nightmare on a deep hole. I had a loupe borrowed at one time that had a angle etched into it, you'd look across the end of the bit and check cutting angles on both sides. My eyes watered up when I had to return it. No clue where you buy them. I am no machinist. (retired electrician/tech)

    I started making a home-made edm to burn out bolts. Bought a book on them and "he used" a vibrating engraving pen, a rod, fluid and reverse polarity on a stick welder to "burn out a center hole" in a broken bolt. USING your idea on centering that'd make a guide if you made if of UHMW, Nylon or other non-conductor. My home-made edm makes the lights flicker in the house next-door, as everything else I do it is overkill.
     
  29. ago
    Joined: Oct 12, 2005
    Posts: 2,199

    ago
    Member
    from pgh. pa.

    Dawai,

    I would like to hear more info on your home made EDM.Sounds interesting.


    Ago
     

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