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home made tools and equipment...

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by kustombuilder, Jan 16, 2008.

  1. bobj49f2
    Joined: Jun 1, 2008
    Posts: 1,791

    bobj49f2
    Member

    As long as the image is small enough not to have to scroll back and forth to see it in it's entirety it's perfect. The size looks perfect to me, big enough to see details but doesn't overfill the screen.

    The construction of the sander is perfect too, just shows you can do what you need to do with what you have. This is a great thread, keep it up.
     
  2. FiddyFour
    Joined: Dec 31, 2004
    Posts: 9,008

    FiddyFour
    Member

    firefox on the laptop and on the mobile resizes large pix to viewable screen area... i heart that option
     
  3. Dawai
    Joined: Oct 1, 2007
    Posts: 263

    Dawai
    Member
    from North Ga.

    Shop sized powdercoat oven to do small engine parts.
    A oil pan would not fit, and had to do valve covers one at a time.. and I am impatient..

    SO, I cut the back out of oven, extended it back 10 more inches, welded the old back onto the rear, now is "DEEP THROAT" enough to swallow a oil pan and ask for more.. or a set of valve covers, timing cover and pulleys.. I wrapped the box with "cer-wool" is what looks like comes in them ovens.. or buy two ovens and weld them together and put the insulation back on. I seem to do everything the hard way.

    Powder coating for the uninitiated is like baking cookies.. you get the oven hot, pre heat up the parts, take them out, spray them with powder till they look like velvet, then put them back into the oven at (mostly 400 degrees) and "time" after the flow out, (gets wet and shiny) and the polymer sets to become a very hard coating you can't get off even if you want to easily. It just shoots clean with a water hose.. easy to take care of. Resists chips and scratches when done right.

    Eastwood and other suppliers have cheap pc guns.. mine is a puffer, a fan, no air hose, and a cup to put the powder, a high voltage clip to "static cling" the dust to the part..

    THIS is for a V8-sized parts.. if you got a six cylinder or tinker with them they are longer..

    THANKS HAMB for the thread that I sat here and read for a hour now..
     

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    Dusty-NZ and j-jock like this.
  4. ago
    Joined: Oct 12, 2005
    Posts: 2,200

    ago
    Member
    from pgh. pa.

    The Wooden Disc sander is neat.
    Look under Popular Mechanics google books, the issues from the 40s,50s and 60s have all kinds of homemade power tools. You can sample the issues and see everything you need to know.




    Ago
     
  5. Cymro
    Joined: Jul 1, 2008
    Posts: 671

    Cymro
    Member

    Nice work looks almost too good to use! only kidding!

    I've just been lent the 1947 book "Popular Mechanics FARM mANUAL" it could have very easily appeared in those pages, by the way the book is a superb example of how to make do and mend and how to "recycle efficiently", (perhaps the buzz word in today's society, traditional rodders are the ultimate in recyclers! ).
     
  6. callcoy
    Joined: Aug 31, 2008
    Posts: 132

    callcoy
    Member
    from Nashville

    Wooden Sander
    Stumpjumper, you are correct, the plan was in SOSS as a reprint of a 1944 Popular Mechanics plan. I figured that the first one was built in 1942 maybe late, the plan was submitted to the magazine in 1943 and it found it way into the magizine by early 1944. Becides that I was born in 1942, my Dad made stuff like this, he was a millwright and always cobled this and that together.

    Thank you to all for your kind comments, by Sat. evening it will have been raffled off.
     
  7. salf100
    Joined: Oct 13, 2009
    Posts: 431

    salf100
    Member

    What are those wheels from?? Nice and simple, the way I like it.:D

     
  8. FiddyFour
    Joined: Dec 31, 2004
    Posts: 9,008

    FiddyFour
    Member

    from the looks of it, those are just bearings
     
  9. Yep. He said they were bearings.
     
  10. atomickustom
    Joined: Aug 30, 2005
    Posts: 3,269

    atomickustom
    Member

    We need part numbers for those bearings! (Or at least what they are and where someone might buy them?)
     
  11. rodl
    Joined: Jan 14, 2011
    Posts: 255

    rodl
    Member

    You are obviously no stranger to working with timber. Looks well constructed and solid. Really nice touch using slotted screws and keeping the heads in alignment. Also the linen coated power lead blends right in with your theme. If you can work sheetmetal like this, then you've got it made!:)
    RodL
     
  12. That wooden disk sander is beautiful. I'd put it on a shelf in my living room, not out in my dirty old garage.
     
  13. gasolinescream
    Joined: Sep 7, 2010
    Posts: 614

    gasolinescream
    Member

    Here's my effort. I like flake and after seeing quite a few folk have dry flaked i thought i'd give it a go with whats around and cheap. Using my 25ltr compressor to blast the flake and relying on rattle cans to do the paint and clear.

    The gun is used from an old cheap sand blasting kit. Using the smallest nozzle (of 3 supplied) for this grade of flake. Just cut the rubber pipe off 3" from the end of the original hose and used the pick up pipe. An old pickle jar holds plenty of flake and has a hole drilled in the top with a rubber bunk tightly holding the pick-up.

    After messing about with it and adjusting the pressure i can get a really good coat of flake out of the gun. Took some fine wet sanding and alot of clear but for a home job, hit with rattle cans i'm happy.

    The said flake gun

    [​IMG]

    Crap picture but gives you an idea

    [​IMG]
     
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  14. Dawai
    Joined: Oct 1, 2007
    Posts: 263

    Dawai
    Member
    from North Ga.

    My top roller is just a "forged" caster from grainger.com. Was $119 when I bought it.. have to be careful here.. cause real good ones from Hoosier wheels are not much more than that. You can buy rollers one at a time if you like.
    Rollers with flats versus rollers with true curve.. a home made frame that is not as stiff as a factory or professional made one has trouble with the flats, when the frame flexes, the flats come out of alignment and the flat edge creases the panel you are trying to shape. It is harder to use a roller with a true radius.. it wants to put ridges in the panel at higher pressures..

    So keep that in mind as you build you one.. My 3rd one I built works. The other two got gave away.

    A toy, a english wheel top roller made from a earth mover bearing, probably cost several thousand dollars.. but was gave to me by a biker buddy from new York,

    Most used tool in shop
    A C-frame press.. lower bed slides from end to end, has a e-wheel top adjustor on one end, has a yoke to put rollers on bottom.. makes a fair e-wheel.. has on the other end a Brake pod off a semi truck to push things.. and in the middle is the normal press area.. thou I have used the screw press-ewheel adjustor as a bushing press on a antique harley case.
    The thing with the orange urethane wheel is a tipping roller, to break the edge on sheetmetal for a flange..
    That tubing bender hanging there.. I think it has to move.. It pivots down out of the way, but I got a job that it will be in the way of..
    (it's been painted since the photo)

    Rock on..,.,,
     

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  15. tooljunkie
    Joined: Oct 18, 2010
    Posts: 209

    tooljunkie
    Member
    from manitoba

    nice.still working on my bargain bin e-wheel/bead roller setup.hopefully another month it will be up and running.
     
  16. Woob
    Joined: May 11, 2004
    Posts: 352

    Woob
    Member
    from Falcon, CO

    My Gingery Forge
    [​IMG]


    Pulling out the "crucible"
    [​IMG]


    Making the pour
    [​IMG]


    A fresh (warm) casting and a finished piece thrown in for comparison.
    [​IMG]
    It isn't billet. It's cast.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2011
  17. louisb
    Joined: Oct 13, 2008
    Posts: 940

    louisb
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    A couple of shots of the tubing bender I built:

    [​IMG]

    I even painted it HF orange so it would feel at home with the rest of my tools. :)

    [​IMG]


    I have used it to build one roll cage so far.

    --louis
     
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  18. nexxussian
    Joined: Mar 14, 2007
    Posts: 3,231

    nexxussian
    Member

    Louis, looks nice, where did you get the dies?
     
  19. louisb
    Joined: Oct 13, 2008
    Posts: 940

    louisb
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    They are Pro Tool dies.

    Thanks,

    --louis
     
  20. bkap
    Joined: Dec 2, 2007
    Posts: 116

    bkap
    Member

    Great HAMB thread on casting and metal working:

    http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=464599
     
  21. No pics (yet), but I just finished up an adaptor for using a harmonic balancer puller/installer to remove control arm bushings. Worked like a CHAMP. Pretty proud of this one!

    I used some heavy wall 2 1/2" tubing and a 1/2" plate "cap" to make the "receiver" end. Just need to drill a hole big enough to get the puller arbor through so the thrust bearing rests on the plate. Then I used an old ARP 7/16 main stud to run through the hole in the bushing, and a thick crank bolt washer as the driver. Just tighten it up like you would pulling a balancer off , and wait for the BANG.
     
  22. bjinatj
    Joined: Jun 24, 2008
    Posts: 431

    bjinatj
    Member

    Here is one that I kind of forgot about until I was looking at pictures on my pc. I needed a die for my bender and could not wait until one was shipped to me. I made a simple radius cutter out of 97 Jeep Wrangler rear shock mount. You cant really see it well in the picture, but the aluminum used to be on old wheel that was melted down and poured into a coffee can.
     

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  23. FiddyFour
    Joined: Dec 31, 2004
    Posts: 9,008

    FiddyFour
    Member

    [​IMG]



     
  24. MikesIron
    Joined: Apr 27, 2011
    Posts: 62

    MikesIron
    Member
    from Union, OR

    I'll jump in and take the liberty of responding to this under the assumption that the OP might not see it:

    The forge is one of several tools that David Gingery has designed for metalworking, and published booklets w/ detailed instructions for each of them. His "Metal Shop from Scrap" series includes:
    1. The Charcoal Foundry
    2. The Metal Lathe
    3. The Metal Shaper
    4. The Milling Machine
    5. The Drill Press
    6. The Dividing Head and Deluxe Accessories
    7. The Sheet Metal Brake

    They were originally published in the 70s and 80s. Not sure where you'd get 'em now, but I'd start searching online for anyone who might carry NOS books. I used to get a mailer every other month or so from an outfit that specialized in old publications -- I mean really old, as in from the turn of the last century (1900s), and I did pick up a lot of them, 'cause that stuff fascinates me. (I'm still blacksmithing using a coal forge, have a 50 yr old manual gear-change lathe, grind all my own tools bits, and own the trip hammer (25# Little Giant) that was the first one shipped west of the Mississippi in 1906, etc.)

    Hope that helps a little,
    Mike
     
  25. MikesIron
    Joined: Apr 27, 2011
    Posts: 62

    MikesIron
    Member
    from Union, OR

    waitin' to see those HF bead roller dies, amigo...

    Mike
     
  26. nexxussian
    Joined: Mar 14, 2007
    Posts: 3,231

    nexxussian
    Member


    Appears they are all available on Amazon, most look to be available new, several other titles by him as well.
     
  27. 97
    Joined: May 18, 2005
    Posts: 1,528

    97
    Member



    Actually you can still get them from

    http://www.gingerybooks.com/
     
  28. mgermca
    Joined: Mar 2, 2008
    Posts: 198

    mgermca
    Member

  29. MikesIron
    Joined: Apr 27, 2011
    Posts: 62

    MikesIron
    Member
    from Union, OR

  30. ago
    Joined: Oct 12, 2005
    Posts: 2,200

    ago
    Member
    from pgh. pa.

    Header flange die, for 304 SS 16g. tubing. I hope the photos explain most of it. machined a tapered die on a my lathe minus the the thickness of the tubing. Then milled the sides down, minus the thickness of tubing. Then sanded to blend the rest. works great doesn't split the tubing.


    Ago
     

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