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home made tools and equipment...

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by kustombuilder, Jan 16, 2008.

  1. Great ideas. American ingenuity is alive and well. From the small to the very large tool (fixture).
     
  2. barney rubble
    Joined: Sep 3, 2008
    Posts: 340

    barney rubble
    Member

    How about a pic of that thing apart so I can see the parts a little better.
     
  3. bkap
    Joined: Dec 2, 2007
    Posts: 115

    bkap
    Member

    Very cool. Thanks.
     
  4. Hi GAb,

    I was really impressed with the band saw and your drawings, but being an old fart and very computer illiterate, I was wondering if you could send me a sketch or dimensional drawing, so I can put one together. I can supply my e-mail or snail mail if you contact me please... I am in Western Australia and love this site and what all you creative, skilled guys (and gals) can do.
     
  5. aribert
    Joined: Apr 1, 2009
    Posts: 20

    aribert
    Member

    Low clearance creeper

    I made this creeper about 20 years ago - before I heard of the DogBone or other low profile creepers. I made it mummy shaped to allow me to get into tight areas (around jack stands, floor jack and the like. Originally it had 2 inch dia casters with 1/4 inch ground clearance. The creeper kept finding small rocks, nuts, bolts, small wrenches to drag on. When I saw some 2.5 inch urethane wheeled casters (wheels similar to what is used on a roller blade) I used the opportunity to increase the ground clearance to 3/4 inch. I had to add outriggers for the new casters.

    The creeper is 45 inches long, made up of 1 inch square tubing and 1/4 flat stock with a padded vinyl wrap on 3/8 plywood. I shaped a piece of dense foam for the two step headrest. If I were to do this over I would increase the upper head rest step by an extra 1.5 inches. I have gotten quite used to this creeper and get annoyed when I use one of the 36 inch long wooden ones that pop up when I start to sit down on it.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    More pics:

    http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/aribert/metalworking/PC180007.jpg
    http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/aribert/metalworking/PC180003.jpg
    http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/aribert/metalworking/PC180012.jpg
    http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/aribert/metalworking/PC180001.jpg
     
  6. onemintcaddy
    Joined: Feb 7, 2007
    Posts: 376

    onemintcaddy
    Member

    See,,,, It pays to Patten the simple things in life,,,, But then again,,,, You would probably be posting on some wall Street Blog rather than hear on the HAMB if you did. :D
    Nice Job.


     
  7. klutchmaster427
    Joined: Jan 18, 2011
    Posts: 229

    klutchmaster427
    Member

    So, this is not my idea, but rather I got the idea from another thread here on the H.A.M.B. and decided to build one myself. I posted pics on the thread I got the info from, and someone suggested I post them here on the homemade tool thread. So here I am! This is the thread where I found the info --> http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/showthread.php?p=6743432#post6743432

    It's a leaf spring spreader to make installing leaf springs WAY easier.
    I decided to do the threaded rod method, and it worked wonders. About $13 for the tube, allthread, nut, and washer. not bad for a tool that is so incredibly helpful with a difficult task.
    I did just as described in this thread. I bought a piece of 5/8" all thread, and a piece of square steel tubing just slightly larger than the all thread. 3/4" I believe. Used a couple whacks of a hammer and steel chisel on two opposing sides of one end of the square tubing. basically making one end of the tube look slightly like an hour glass. The point of this was for the two side walls to fold inward instead of outward when I flattened the end. Then I beat the end relatively equal on the other two sides the create somewhat of a chisel tip on one end of the steel tube. Then I used a grinder on one end of the all thread to accomplish the same thing. Thread the nut onto the all thread, stick the washer on it, and slight it inside the tube. Now you have yourself a handy dandy leaf spring stretcher that will save you lots of time when trying to remove or install leaf springs. Just put either end of the stretcher in the crevice near the eye of each side of the leaf spring, tighten the nut, and voila!

    Now here come the pictures.
    The first few pictures show both ends of the spring spreader so you can see how they were made.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    The next two pictures show how both ends are positioned on the leaf spring itself.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    And the last two pictures are a before and after, if you will, of the spreader in action.
    The first is before the nut has been tightened. The spreader has been extended just long enough to hold it on the leaf spring. In the second picture, the spreader has been extended enough to spread the leaf spring out at least a couple of inches. I didn't measure but you can tell just by looking that the difference is clear. The nut wasn't even getting difficult to turn at this point. This is definitely a great tool to make and keep around.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Dusty-NZ likes this.
  8. Damn. That's a cool tool.
     
  9. mrjynx
    Joined: Nov 24, 2008
    Posts: 971

    mrjynx
    BANNED

    rytang likes this.
  10. Wardog
    Joined: Jan 12, 2010
    Posts: 2,154

    Wardog
    Member

    Oh yeah bring that combo shit on!!!
    I've allready built an english wheel and beadroller after reading this thread. I also have a air chisle to make a planishing hammer out of.
    Realy keen to see this built.
    How about incorperating a mechanical louvre punch as well like the williams one?
     
  11. captmullette
    Joined: Oct 15, 2009
    Posts: 1,929

    captmullette
    Member

    I did not make this, as you can see, but while in the process of running my fuel line on my sedan the square tubing is 1/4 in. wall i finally ran out of drill bits and i didnt really have room for my angle drill and bit, so i got one of these self drilling screws, works great in that 1/4 in. steel for a pilot hole, am i dumb, or did all you guys know this.....plus you get a full box for 5 bucks..
     

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    wrench3047 likes this.
  12. onemintcaddy
    Joined: Feb 7, 2007
    Posts: 376

    onemintcaddy
    Member



    Ya,,,, Found out about them back in the 90's. There the Cat's Ass Man.
     
  13. nexxussian
    Joined: Mar 14, 2007
    Posts: 3,231

    nexxussian
    Member


    Yeah, they make great taps too. :D

    I've used them when installing clamps or hold downs in tight locations to be able to drill and tap the hole, then replace it with a better screw (I can't seem to get the self drilling / taping ones tight enough, the heads twist off before it happens :( ).

    Just make sure to get screws the same size and thread pitch. :D
     
  14. Truxx1956
    Joined: Jan 31, 2010
    Posts: 50

    Truxx1956
    Member

    I just love it everytime that you post man, I get to see your avatar :D :cool:
     
  15. atomicjoe23
    Joined: Jul 16, 2011
    Posts: 2

    atomicjoe23
    Member

    Hey that's a great idea and I just happen to have an extra table saw. . .can't believe I never thought of that before. . .

    . . .just found this thread via a link from Race-dezert.com. . .thanks for posting all the great ideas!
     
  16. tooljunkie
    Joined: Oct 18, 2010
    Posts: 209

    tooljunkie
    Member
    from manitoba

    the next thing to this is when you chuck the screw (1/4 hex ones)directly in the drill.for one,its hard to drop,especailly if theres a ring terminal and wire on it-great for under dash ground wires.also makes great short bit when an angle drill is all the room you have.
     
  17. niceguyede
    Joined: Jan 19, 2009
    Posts: 633

    niceguyede
    Member
    from dallas


    I've been using those for years instead of clecos cause theyre cheaper and no one steals em!!
     
  18. Wardog
    Joined: Jan 12, 2010
    Posts: 2,154

    Wardog
    Member

    Here they are.
     

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  19. Wardog
    Joined: Jan 12, 2010
    Posts: 2,154

    Wardog
    Member

    Also an 18" brake and a 12" anvil
     

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  20. vividlyvintage
    Joined: Aug 17, 2010
    Posts: 671

    vividlyvintage
    Member

    Is that anvil made from a rail road track?

    Also do you have tge building plans for the 18" brake? I like the simplicity of that one you have there.

    Makes me wonder where you can buy surplus rail road track now days?

    Thanks,
    Skrach
    www.VividlyVintage.com
     
  21. Wardog
    Joined: Jan 12, 2010
    Posts: 2,154

    Wardog
    Member

    The brake is a mixture of what came out of my head and looking at the six footer at work.
    Yes the anvil is rail road track. A guy i work with gave me three foot. Ask around, Now I have some every one seems to offer it to me!
     
  22. Voh
    Joined: Oct 18, 2006
    Posts: 813

    Voh
    Member

    [​IMG]

    do you have a back shot of that brake? I would like to see more on the clamp setup. I built a break a bit back, but neet to improve on the clamp. That looks good.
     
  23. Wardog
    Joined: Jan 12, 2010
    Posts: 2,154

    Wardog
    Member

    I'll try to get a couple more shots up soon for you guys.
     
  24. Jon1953B4
    Joined: Nov 26, 2010
    Posts: 85

    Jon1953B4
    Member
    from MD

    Not as much homemade as pieced together w/ free parts but I think its cool and it serves its purpose.
     

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  25. rockable
    Joined: Dec 21, 2009
    Posts: 2,618

    rockable
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I hope it was grade 8, Jeff! Run of the mill all thread can be pretty soft and you can't imagine how quickly you will jump/jerk or whatever when that sucker let's go. I've had my coil spring comressor turn loose on a compressed spring and it's scary!
     
  26. niceguyede
    Joined: Jan 19, 2009
    Posts: 633

    niceguyede
    Member
    from dallas

    x2! I like a block of wood and the weight of the car, with the motor in of course!! It's not always possible, though. I have seen several "quality" spring compressors let go without warning and its not fun!!
     
  27. Wardog
    Joined: Jan 12, 2010
    Posts: 2,154

    Wardog
    Member

    Hope this helps. The third shot is from behind.
     

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  28. Voh
    Joined: Oct 18, 2006
    Posts: 813

    Voh
    Member

    I carved out a dish in the top of a hardwood log. Not 100% sure the dish is the right shape, but i will try it out.
    [​IMG]
     
  29. niceguyede
    Joined: Jan 19, 2009
    Posts: 633

    niceguyede
    Member
    from dallas

    Any dish is a good dish! I like mine with variations so I can make different contours. I dont think I have one dish thats even close to perfectly round.
     
  30. Dang I just had to register because of this rockin' thread Thanks guys n gals
     

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