Register now to get rid of these ads!

home made tools and equipment...

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by kustombuilder, Jan 16, 2008.

  1. onemintcaddy
    Joined: Feb 7, 2007
    Posts: 376

    onemintcaddy
    Member


    Now you need an extension on your Drill Press,,,,, My Old Man was short also.
     
  2. PBR STREETGANG
    Joined: Dec 8, 2010
    Posts: 40

    PBR STREETGANG
    Member

  3. PBR STREETGANG
    Joined: Dec 8, 2010
    Posts: 40

    PBR STREETGANG
    Member

    The Chinese drill presses are junk too. Maybe I ought to build my own drill press.
     
  4. dawford
    Joined: Apr 25, 2010
    Posts: 499

    dawford
    Member

    Today I built a gear driven engine stand.

    If you have ever used an engine stand that has a tube handle that goes thru the hub that is used to rotate the engine you will recognize the short commings of this arangement.

    If you use a cherry picker to lift the engine to install it to the engine stand you will sometimes find it hard to get a good balance on the engine.

    Then when you pull the locking pin the engine is either hard to rotate or it wants to get away from you and rotate to where the heaviest part is on the bottom.

    Even if you do get an good initial balance on the engine, when you install or remove a heavy part such as the head you will change the center of gravity and then make it difficult to rotate the engine.

    There are two solutions. Purchase a $200.00 gear driven engine stand or make one out of your existing stand for $30.00 and some POH that is Parts On Hand.

    The parts on hand included a timming chain and the 2 timming gears that go with it. If you don't have a set you can probably get one free at an engine shop because they usually throw them away when they rebuild an engine.

    I also used a fence clamp and a 6" piece of angle iron.

    I bought a new Harbor Freight engine stand on sale for $39.99 and a cable wench for $29.99.

    The next one I make I will use the old Harbor Freight engine stand that is currently holding an engine project in progress.

    Again I will use Harbor Freight #5798 2000 lb worm gear cable wench $32.99 regular, $29.99 on sale.

    I recommend the worm drive wench because they don't unwind when the engine is left in an unbalanced position.

    The first thing that I do to the wench is take the bolt holding the spool off and remove the spool and the tube bearing that is inside the spool axle.

    Then I push out the bearing and set it aside so that it dosn't get damage.

    I then cut the inside of the spool about 1/2" to 3/4" from the gear side. The one in the picture is about 1 1/2" from the gear but the next one will be closer to the gear. See the 3rd picture below.

    Do not cut all of the way thru just far enough to go thru the outer spool tube. If you look at the 4th picture you will see an end view showing a tube inside a tube.

    You will notice that the tube on mine wasn't centered when it was welded but it won't matter because you are going to weld your small timming gear centered on the smaller 15/16" tube anyway.

    I used a lathe to cut mine off because I didn't know how it was put together.

    The next one I will chuck in my lathe turning backward and use a 4 1/2" cutoff wheel turning the opposite direction to cut the spool off.

    You could use a hack saw but be carefull to cut streight because you are going to use that edge of the larger tube as a sholder to weld the gear to.

    When cut thru the non-geared half of the spool will just slide off of the smaller tube because it is not welded at that end.

    Then I slid the small timing gear over the shaft and up against the shoulder of the larger tube.

    I cut a bushing to center that gear but the next one I will just find something about .2" in diameter to use for spacers to center the gear.

    I will then weld the gear to the larger tube and then remove the spacers and weld up the space between the gear and the spool shaft.

    Caution should be used so that you don't burn thru the spool shaft while filling the space. Tack weld then weld a little at a time untill done.

    Then when cool reinstall the shaft being sure to include the timming belt around the gear. I used some anti-seize on the spindle bearing.

    I used a galvanized fence bracket to hold the engine stand head shaft tight against the frame and welded the large cam gear onto the shaft. You can see that in the 6th picture.

    I was fortunate in that the flange on the gear was just about a perfect match for size with the shaft. I just held it as close to centered and tacked it. After making sure it was as close as I could make it by eye I welded it on.

    I then drilled the 6" angle Iron bracket to go onto the wench frame using the spool shaft bolt and the other spacer bolt to hold it to the wench.

    I then installed the timming chain over the large gear on the head and positioned the wench bracket against the side of the frame securing it with a C clamp.

    I adjusted the position untill the chain was straight and the crank could be turned the 84 turns it takes to rotate the head 360 degrees.

    The chain wanted to get tight in one place due to the fact that one or both of the gears weren't perfectly centered. I just tapped the bracket with a small hammer untill it turned without getting tight.

    I then welded the bracket to the frame. It could be bolted if you don't want to burn the paint.

    The end result is very much like the $200.00 stand except that this stand is not foldable and it takes about 25% more turns to a complete 360 degree rotation.

    I will never have an engine get out of controll with these engine stands.

    Dick :) :) :)

    .
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jan 13, 2011
    Shadow Creek and j-jock like this.
  5. bjinatj
    Joined: Jun 24, 2008
    Posts: 431

    bjinatj
    Member


    Great Idea!!
     
  6. budd
    Joined: Oct 31, 2006
    Posts: 3,479

    budd
    Member

    QUOTE Today I built a gear driven engine stand.

    that would work on a car rotisserie to
     
  7. bjinatj
    Joined: Jun 24, 2008
    Posts: 431

    bjinatj
    Member


    Another great idea... Thanks budd!
     
  8. dawford
    Joined: Apr 25, 2010
    Posts: 499

    dawford
    Member

    Budd,

    I was thinking about that also and looked up some plans for a rotisserie.

    Right now I have a gantry and I figure on using it to lift the body off of the Model A Woodie in my Avitar when I replace the wood between the body and the frame.

    There are 2 oak beams that are history and need replacement. The upper wood is very good original and has a great patina. The floor in the back has been replaced at some time prior to my getting the car.

    I will use as much of the original floor boards as it is possible to save.

    Anyway I would like to see a rotisserie that uses 2 engine stands as the basis for it construction and yes this rotary gear setup would be perfect.

    The original cable wench is set up for 2000 lbs pull but that is counting on the a small spool diameter.

    The cam chain and gears won't brake anyway and the double gear reduction gives it an 84 to one reduction total.

    If 2 engine stands were used and both of the head sockets were lubed with anti-seize like I used I think they would allow a fairly heavy car body to rotate quite well.

    Anti-sieze must have graphite or something in it. It is slipperier than a crocked polititian.

    They would have to be well alligned to minimize binding and the body would have to be well balanced.

    Each engine stand was designed for 1000 lbs so it is reasonable to expect that they would support a body weighing maybe 1500 lbs with a margin of safety.

    The connecting material would have to also support that amount of weight.

    I don't think that top or bottom heavy body would be able to overcome the self locking nature of this setup, however if it did then the top pin lock would have to be used in which case the gate hanger would have to be replaced with an other sustem to keep the head tight.

    That modification would be easy. The only reason I used the gate piece is because it was the first piece I found that I figured would be easy for others to locate for thier stands

    I am just throwing out opinion and ideas and really have not seen enough other peoples designs to come up with a design of my own.

    This is what I love to do.

    That is design and build projects not throw out opinions and ideas. :D

    Anyway Budd you just added wood to the fire as far as a rotisserie design is concerned.

    Anyone have a design that my rotary gear would work on speak up.

    Dick :) :) :)

    .
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2011
  9. dawford
    Joined: Apr 25, 2010
    Posts: 499

    dawford
    Member

    Today I measured my 2003 Lincoln Town Sedan and found that it is about 76" wide.

    Therefore I think that the axis of a rotisserie should be about 40 inches off of the ground.

    The engine stand axis is about 31" off of the ground and would have to be raised about 9".

    I would just cut off the cast iron wheel axle and weld the bottom of the engine stand frame to a longer piece of square tubing with heavy duty dolley wheels that raised the stand to 40".

    I also noted that the engine stand axis is slanted upward a little and this would be addressed by cutting a small wedge shaped piece out of the riser, bending and welding it to level.

    I would then weld kicker braces from both ends of the original base up to the head to stabilize it.

    I would cut off the original bracket that bolted to the original dolly wheels leaving about 23" of square tubing. That would total about 46" of adjustment for the overall length of the rotisserie.

    I would use square tubing to slip over the two 23" stubs that was of the appropriate length to work on what ever body length necessary.

    The only thing that I have no idea how to design is the mechanism to attach and balance the body.

    I will have to see some of the ideas and designs that others have used.

    I may make one to work on my 1929 Model A Tudor when I lift it off the frame to box girder the it, add F100 front drum brakes, 8.8 rear end and a T5 transmission.

    I may also put one of my Mercruiser 4 cylinder big block engines in it.

    Anyway balancing the body is a problem that I have not yet tackled.

    I took a couple of more pictures that better show the finished engine stand.

    Dick :) :) :)
     

    Attached Files:

  10. dawford
    Joined: Apr 25, 2010
    Posts: 499

    dawford
    Member

    .

    Here is what Turbo26T Did with 2 engine stands.

    See post #10 on the thread below.

    http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=533241&highlight=rotisserie

    And another I found below posted by Abomination.

    For some reason when I click on this thread listed inside my post it comes up without the pictures so I copied and posted the first picture that shows the basic setup.

    http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=279265&highlight=rotisserie

    Thanks Abomination and Flank


    This stand and my rotary gear might make the perfect marriage.

    I guess I'm missing something not having used or even seen one of these used, but why the big thing about height adjustment.

    I hate to show my ignorance but sometimes have to admit that I still have much to learn.

    I just figured out how I will address the height problem.

    I just don't know what the benefits are.

    The idea I have will also solve the balance problem.

    Dick :) :) :)
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jan 14, 2011
  11. AZAV8
    Joined: May 3, 2005
    Posts: 997

    AZAV8
    Member
    from Tucson, AZ

    Tigman here on the HAMB makes and sells them. That's where I bought mine. Great service and quick to ship. Mine is for the Dewalt variable speed band saw. Link to the HAMB Classified thread is here:

    http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=323369

    Good price too and by buying from him you support a fellow HAMBer.
     
  12. onemintcaddy
    Joined: Feb 7, 2007
    Posts: 376

    onemintcaddy
    Member

    Now Thats the Kittys Butt,,,,,,,,,,
     
  13. ExcessiveRodder
    Joined: Dec 30, 2009
    Posts: 21

    ExcessiveRodder
    Member

    I am looking to build a FED and knew I was going to need a tube notcher.

    After looking at the ones that can be purchased in my price range
    :)rolleyes: cheap), I wasn't impressed. After reading some of the impressions I decided to build my own.

    It was built using steel I aready had in the garage and all I actually had to buy was 5/8 rod for the shaft and the pillow blocks.

    The pillow blocks are a cheap vareity and required some shimming to run smoothly.

    The machine shop that I use regularly ,tapped the 5/8 shaft so that I could thread directly in to the hole saw without any adapters.

    Below are a few pics.
     

    Attached Files:

    j-jock likes this.
  14. KrisKustomPaint
    Joined: Apr 20, 2007
    Posts: 1,107

    KrisKustomPaint
    Member

    thats on helluva nice tubing notcher.
     
  15. bruce bowe
    Joined: Apr 29, 2009
    Posts: 264

    bruce bowe
    Member

    nice tubing notcher
     
  16. ExcessiveRodder
    Joined: Dec 30, 2009
    Posts: 21

    ExcessiveRodder
    Member

    Thanks for the compliments.

    Works well to. Can be clamped in a vise and use a drill instead of the drill press if needed.

    Cost me less that one of the HF models, can't even get that one here in Canuckland.
     
  17. fitzee
    Joined: Feb 26, 2003
    Posts: 2,863

    fitzee
    Member

    Nice job on the notcher. I was only the other day looking at them pillow blocks and wonder what I could make from them. This is one thing
     
  18. ExcessiveRodder
    Joined: Dec 30, 2009
    Posts: 21

    ExcessiveRodder
    Member

    I will trade you for that old hemi .;)

    I can even pick itup in the summer when I come out east to see the relatives .
     
  19. DamnYankeesKustoms
    Joined: Jan 14, 2010
    Posts: 297

    DamnYankeesKustoms
    Member

    wood stove made out of old brake drums from my dads semi...
     
  20. DamnYankeesKustoms
    Joined: Jan 14, 2010
    Posts: 297

    DamnYankeesKustoms
    Member

    sorry pics won't upload for some reason..
     
  21. bct
    Joined: Apr 4, 2005
    Posts: 3,056

    bct
    Member

    built a planishing hammer
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    cut down princess auto hammer

    [​IMG]
    this came from an old profile grinder for planer blades i have parts from it on my ewheel , milling machine , bead roller and this.....plus i have 16" of dovetail still for a power hammer build
    [​IMG][/
     
  22. bjinatj
    Joined: Jun 24, 2008
    Posts: 431

    bjinatj
    Member


    Make sure you document that power hammer build.. I know I personally would like to see it.

    ;)
     
  23. bct
    Joined: Apr 4, 2005
    Posts: 3,056

    bct
    Member

    ^ ..will do . i threw some old leaf spring pieces in the fire last night to make em soft .
     
  24. 22george
    Joined: Feb 12, 2011
    Posts: 25

    22george
    Member
    from ohio

    I made a 6 arm jig to hold fenders etc. I got the idea from a Lazze metalshaping video on youtube. I'll paint it this spring
     

    Attached Files:

    • 001.jpg
      001.jpg
      File size:
      160.4 KB
      Views:
      2,615
  25. nice jig. this is a great thread .
     
  26. Built my own rotisserie. Drew it up on CAD, and then welded it together. I have full plans if any one is interested. PM me for details.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    bct likes this.
  27. mgtstumpy
    Joined: Jul 20, 2006
    Posts: 7,700

    mgtstumpy
    Member

    Likewise, did the research and built my own rotisserie and body hoist that attaches to top arm of engine crane. Also built a trammel bar to measure chassis, wheelbases, diagonals etc. Ensures accuracy etc. Can do measuring yourself. ;)
     

    Attached Files:

  28. Lukydevl
    Joined: Feb 23, 2010
    Posts: 700

    Lukydevl
    Member
    from Arizona

    Got any pix of the body hoist in action???
     
  29. mgtstumpy
    Joined: Jul 20, 2006
    Posts: 7,700

    mgtstumpy
    Member

    Very similar to FrozenMerc's hoist except that spigot takes the load directly under the centre. Rams attach to brackets under spigot and on lower corner and spread the load evenly. Rams are parallel to vertical posts. I plan to drill the underside of spigot and tap a hole for a grease nipple so it remains lubricated and easy to turn with weight. No friction as short of interference fit, definitely not sloppy.

    Spigot itself and all RHS is 5mm wall so it will take a Galaxy 500 wagon body with complete drive train and interior. Definitely not a lightweight by any means. I'll add wheels later when I downsize current house and shed. There are a number of intermediate bars that attach between the lower horizontal arms to maintain integrity once there is weight on vertical uprights.

    Spigot has holes at every 45 degree and plenty of flexibility. Shaft has adjust-ability every 6". Base is 6' wide to add stability when loaded. Each hydraulic ram has a 2' stroke and 10 ton capacity so I can get it up to whatever desired level. Will definitely be even better when assembling the car and better for us old folk, save crawling underneath on a creeper.

    My 46 Olds sedanette weighs roughly 3.6K lbs in stock form :eek: so no lightweight. Whole unit has plenty of adjust-ability to get centre of gravity right. Not the best pictures, still working on driving the new phone:eek:
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Feb 21, 2011
  30. mgtstumpy
    Joined: Jul 20, 2006
    Posts: 7,700

    mgtstumpy
    Member

    This is the body lift that attaches to top of engine crane, other one for inside car.

    External one (JPJ) just slides into RHS after you remove the extendable arm, internal (PDF) attaches to engine crane and balances once everything is centred. It can be made to pivot by using a large bolt over solid attaching flanges.

    I'll post my engine / transmission balancing tool with pivot that can be adapted similar to arm (PDF). Again lots of adjustability depending on what angle you want, great for front and rear ends and easy to balance weight distribution by using available holes. Again 5mm wall RHS. Better to over engineer than under engineer.
     

    Attached Files:

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2020 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.