Register now to get rid of these ads!

home made tools and equipment...

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by kustombuilder, Jan 16, 2008.

  1. sniperfab
    Joined: Nov 25, 2009
    Posts: 2

    sniperfab
    Member

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    e-wheel im in the process of putting together...
     
    rytang likes this.
  2. Tim G
    Joined: Jan 3, 2009
    Posts: 551

    Tim G
    Member


    Thanks, i appreciate that :)

    Hey Sniper that engish wheel is almost too darn pretty :D

    First on my list of serious tools to make is an english wheel, the fab is not a problem, Any UK guys on here know the best place to get wheels for one in England? i can get them from the US but it will be either expensive to ship or take a very long time.
     
  3. Morris
    Joined: May 9, 2009
    Posts: 46

    Morris
    Member
    from UK

    Tim,
    there's a guy makes english wheels in Kettering, Northants (I know you are local-ish). Maybe a source. Sorry I have no details but he comes up on Google.

    Paul
     
  4. Tim G
    Joined: Jan 3, 2009
    Posts: 551

    Tim G
    Member

    Oh really, excellent... i'll see what i can find out, Kettering is 20 miles from me :)
     
  5. RichG
    Joined: Dec 8, 2008
    Posts: 3,917

    RichG
    Member

    Amen to that! Ingenuity beats money hands down every time!
     
  6. I used a ball peen hammer and a sidewalk joint for a bead roller for the trunk floor on my Firebird. It's ugly, but the fuel cell hides it nicely. Now I have one joint in my sidewalk that's a bit wider, but sometimes you gotta make sacrifices. As for the trunk floor, eight years and counting, not a single problem.

    I used the telephone pole by my garage as a paint stand. Just put the part on the foot peg the linemen climb up on and spray away.

    I used the stopsign pole and a body hammer to shape a curve I needed.

    Tools are where you find them!

    Happy Hunting.
     
  7. Donut Dave
    Joined: Jul 9, 2007
    Posts: 330

    Donut Dave
    Member

    Here is a inexpensive idea to use a hand held metal shear as a stationary mounted tool. I purchased a $29 (on sale) metal shear from HF and made a saddle bracket which is held in my vise. Simply feed the material (.050 max) and you can made a very clean cut, quick and easy.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. bobj49f2
    Joined: Jun 1, 2008
    Posts: 1,786

    bobj49f2
    Member

    I people don't have a hard time finding your house when you give them dirctions:

    When you get to the stop sign with the mashed up pole turn left;

    At the phone pole with the green, black, yellow, purple paint overspray turn left again;

    Look for the house with the pavement in need of repair :D

    I bet your neighbors like you around just for the entertainment value.

    I like it, cheap, easy and useful.
     
  9. bjinatj
    Joined: Jun 24, 2008
    Posts: 431

    bjinatj
    Member


    That is too funny!
     
  10. I made this press for my bench at work. Its strong enough to press on differential bearings which I seem to do a lot of....:D Sorry for the crappy picture as I had to crop it out of a much bigger picture.
     

    Attached Files:

  11. the metalsurgeon
    Joined: Apr 19, 2009
    Posts: 1,239

    the metalsurgeon
    Member
    from Denver

    An English Wheel should have zero flex,this is no.1 priority in an English Wheel or your really wasting your time and efforts trying to make one.This is why the originals were cast.
     
  12. bjinatj
    Joined: Jun 24, 2008
    Posts: 431

    bjinatj
    Member


    Don't take this as me being a jerk. I am by no means trying to be one, but......

    I am sure that a non-flexing cast english wheel is better than a non cast, but I hardley believe anyone is wasting their time. This axle is meant to hold up quite a bit of weight. I have a buddy with a POS harbor freight english wheel and it does exactly what it is supposed to do only slower than a big money wheel (money is not something that all of us have). I guarantee this e wheel with do it faster than the one he has made out of chopsticks...
     
  13. the metalsurgeon
    Joined: Apr 19, 2009
    Posts: 1,239

    the metalsurgeon
    Member
    from Denver


    so does that mean your callin me a jerk?....lol only joking.

    ok your homemade wheel will certainly have its limitations as you crank up the pressure it will only lift the top wheel (flexing and opening your frame outwards) so if you have a panel you have to wheel up,ie a fender with tons of shape there is a very good chance you wont get the pressure between the wheels you need to achieve the required shape.
     
  14. jhnarial
    Joined: Mar 18, 2007
    Posts: 410

    jhnarial
    Member
    from MISSOURI


    Jeff is just making a fender roller with the axle.It should be plenty strong enough for that. He has two big wheels that are plenty stiff enough.

    The reason you want a stiff frame is because if you don't the wheels will go out of alignment when applying pressure. I run lower anvils with flats in them ,you want the upper wheel running true on the flats not just on the edge of the flat when pressure is applied.

    Harbor freight wheels are crap you do not notice it running out of alignment because they come with true radius anvils. I am not a harbor freight supporter,they steal all of their ideas.
     
  15. the metalsurgeon
    Joined: Apr 19, 2009
    Posts: 1,239

    the metalsurgeon
    Member
    from Denver


    it has nothing to do with alignment??? its all about the pressure asserted
     
  16. ago
    Joined: Oct 12, 2005
    Posts: 2,196

    ago
    Member
    from pgh. pa.

    American Rodder July 1994 has a good, how to make a heavy duty bead roller. by Mike Bishop. that magazine in the 90s had a bunch of good articles.



    Ago
     
  17. jhnarial
    Joined: Mar 18, 2007
    Posts: 410

    jhnarial
    Member
    from MISSOURI


    It is just a personal observation. I do not need very much pressure to wheel a panel.If i do need to apply a lot of pressure the panel is telling me it is not ready for the wheel yet. if I need to raise(stretch) the metal up a 1/4 inch,I will hammer it up. Then wheel it smooth with light pressure.

    So I am more interested in my frame being stiff enough to hold my anvils in alignment in any position.

    You are right but this is just how I see it. You can not go wrong with a stiff frame.
     
  18. plym49
    Joined: Aug 9, 2008
    Posts: 2,797

    plym49
    Member
    from Earth

    Different tools for different jobs and if you need a hammer and have a rock, there's your hammer. There is never just one answer, just what is right or works in any given circumstance.

    This is one of my favorite threads.
     

  19. OK, show us your stuff!!!!!!!!!!
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2010
  20. Here is a rack I built for my welder.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  21. bjinatj
    Joined: Jun 24, 2008
    Posts: 431

    bjinatj
    Member

    Well call me Harbor Freight... I am stealing this idea tonight!
     
  22. Morris
    Joined: May 9, 2009
    Posts: 46

    Morris
    Member
    from UK

    How did you do?
    http://www.justinbaker.co.uk/
     
  23. MichiganJames
    Joined: Dec 20, 2009
    Posts: 36

    MichiganJames
    Member

    there is some great home made tools in here! I deffinetly plan to steal some ideas.
    The best thing ive seen made on a forums was a guy building his own cnc plasma cutter.
     
  24. bjinatj
    Joined: Jun 24, 2008
    Posts: 431

    bjinatj
    Member

    We need to keep this at the top..
     
  25. I made a similar tool:
    http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/showthread.php?p=4793440#post4793440
    [​IMG]
     
  26. Cousin just sent this with the caption,
    FINALLY GOT A GOOD JACKSTAND!
    Bill.
     

    Attached Files:

  27. billsill45
    Joined: Jul 15, 2009
    Posts: 784

    billsill45
    Member
    from SoCal

    Speaking of people with a death wish....
     
  28. I think that I posted a pic of my modified HF bead roller before but here is the new steering wheel for it and where it fits. It has a gear reduction motor drive on the back side with a removable hitch pin to allow not having to drive the motor when hand turning and a foot switch to activated the reversible motor. Total cost approx $110. HF roller was free as was the motor & steel. Costs were $45 Steering wheel (HotRodBetty $25 + shipping) Footswitch $12 HF. Dual action switch ACE $7, paint $17 Carquest, Drive chain (motorcycle) $10, Misc bolts & set screws $20.

    I really like not having to reach to the backside of the bead roller to turn it manually.

    Because of this I've also converted me slip roller to a 20" steel, sail boat steering wheel instead of the crank handle for more smooth motion

    Movin/on
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jan 23, 2010
  29. 37mj
    Joined: Jan 22, 2009
    Posts: 66

    37mj
    Member

    this parts holding jig thing i made about 10 yrs ago for holding fenders ,hoods when doing body work . the legs slide back and forth ,go up and down for height adjustment . the top bar slides in and out an will spin 360 . had everything from model a fenders to mid 70's caddy hoods on this thing . it comes apart to store ,all flat pieces once apart ... best part it was all scrap items :D
     

    Attached Files:

  30. Black Primer
    Joined: Oct 1, 2007
    Posts: 967

    Black Primer
    Member

    I made this today to hold and balance my front axle. Although it may be simple, it sure made positioning the axle under the frame much easier by myself. It's made from an old leaf spring, and two old u-bolts. It fits in the saddle of my floor jack. Thought I'd share...
     

    Attached Files:

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2020 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.