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home made tools and equipment...

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by kustombuilder, Jan 16, 2008.

  1. atch
    Joined: Sep 3, 2002
    Posts: 4,485

    atch
    Member

    I agree with Mart; very nicely played...




    I have pix on my computer of a dozen or more hub pullers. a couple are factory made and the rest home made. Yours looks as effective as any of them.

    I'll add here: yours and two others are "two piece". The rest slide on from the side (of the puller). One of these other two uses muffler clamps to hold it together and the other one uses a piece of tubing just large enough to slide down over the puller to keep the two halves together.
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2020
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  2. Darin Younce
    Joined: May 8, 2019
    Posts: 576

    Darin Younce

    I have pix on my computer of a dozen or more hub pullers. a couple are factory made and the rest home made. Yours looks as effective as any of them.

    I'll add here: yours and two others are "two piece". The rest slide on from the side (of the puller). One of these others uses muffler clamps to hold it together and the other one uses a piece of tubing just large enough to slide down over the puller to keep the two halves together.[/QUOTE] thanks , just using what I had around shop , Luckily had almost perfect diameter pipe, had a hard time seeing yesterday because of this ocular migraine crap so I took some short cuts and decided the simplest thing was to use a muffler clamp which I did not have in correct size
     
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  3. bobbytnm
    Joined: Dec 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,367

    bobbytnm
    Member

    Looks like it should work. Put some load on it and then give the center bolt a good sharp whack with a mallet.

    Here's a puller I built awhile back
    IMG_5008.JPEG IMG_5009.JPEG IMG_5011.JPEG IMG_5021.jpg
     
  4. atch
    Joined: Sep 3, 2002
    Posts: 4,485

    atch
    Member

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  5. Fortunateson
    Joined: Apr 30, 2012
    Posts: 3,336

    Fortunateson
    Member

    That is really impressive backyard thinking which I appreciate! Very cool. Thanks for such a thorough expalanation and pics...
     
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  6. JanneManne
    Joined: Jul 27, 2020
    Posts: 1

    JanneManne

    Looks super, do you have plans for that?
    I only see pics with photobucket over it.
    I would love to make something similar.
     
  7. Darin Younce
    Joined: May 8, 2019
    Posts: 576

    Darin Younce

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  8. bobbytnm
    Joined: Dec 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,367

    bobbytnm
    Member

    Thanks, but I think yours should work just fine. If it gets the job done then It's an awesome tool!
    Good job on it
     
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  9. Darin Younce
    Joined: May 8, 2019
    Posts: 576

    Darin Younce

    well it did work but by the time I got thru , it looked Frankenstein-ish . the gold looking y shaped part where the big 5/8 fine threaded bolt that actually pushes , bent at-least an eight if an inch, the two side bolts kept causing it to get out of center so I had to weld some tubular bushings at the outer edge to keep those two bolts in line . Next time I will copy yours.
     
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  10. RMONTY
    Joined: Jan 7, 2016
    Posts: 1,969

    RMONTY
    Member

    Its been done many times. But this is my version. It works like a charm! The three holes are so the pedals can be moved out if the piece you are working is wide and you are having trouble reaching the pedals. I had never seen that done before so that is my twist to the build. 20200726_185753.jpg 20200726_185848.jpg 20200725_182647.jpg 20200719_180321.jpg
     
  11. cfmvw
    Joined: Aug 24, 2015
    Posts: 396

    cfmvw
    Member

    I've had this packing crate from my woodstove in the driveway for the last three years since I built the house. I keep threatening to cut it up for kindling, but it's so darned useful! My son and I use it as a workbench for numerous projects when it's nice out; we are always clamping down plywood or lumber for whatever we happen to be working on (metalwork, painting, woodworking, gardening), so we keep finding excuses to keep it around. IMG_20200726_154658.jpg
     
  12. lake_harley
    Joined: Jun 4, 2017
    Posts: 1,062

    lake_harley
    Member

    Put my gantry (that's what I call it anyway) to the test today. Switched a better coupe body onto the frame I had been working on. This is a photo of lifting the "good" body off of the "donor" frame.

    Cranking torque to lift the body is still a little high, but this body still had the seat, all glass and full interior in it, so it was a pretty good load. Rear is lifted with a cherry picker using a long ratchet strap as a sling to go under the body just aft of the rear of the roof. Since today was the first time I used it, I did have stands and a second piece of square tubing under the body as a safety backup

    Tubing of the "A" frames is only 1 1/8" X .049 but it worked out OK. Cross tube is 1 1/2" X .083". It will come apart to 3 sections so it won't take up a lot of room when I'm not needing it which is likely 99.999999% of the time. Sure beats messing around with two jacks and a long piece of tubing and stacks of concrete and wood blocks. Lifting the body on and off with 3 or 4 helpers/friends would be simpler and likely quicker but they're not always available when you want to do something.

    Lynn

    20200728_145522.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2020
  13. bobbytnm
    Joined: Dec 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,367

    bobbytnm
    Member

    LOL, well, at least you got the job done. Hopefully you won't need it for a long time to come
     
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  14. Mart
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 4,170

    Mart
    Member

    When it comes to tightening rear hub pullers I say if it doesn't feel like something is going to break, the hub wasn't tight enough.
     
  15. Mike Rouse
    Joined: Aug 12, 2004
    Posts: 364

    Mike Rouse
    Member

    That is a well thought out bandsaw. Very nice job
     
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  16. Mike Rouse
    Joined: Aug 12, 2004
    Posts: 364

    Mike Rouse
    Member

    EBC8CCDE-1703-444D-B2EA-47208B596F37.jpeg 87111ACD-CB14-47A2-A436-70910EB40CA2.jpeg 87111ACD-CB14-47A2-A436-70910EB40CA2.jpeg I just finished making a slapper and a hammer using a $15 cutting board.
     
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  17. hrm2k
    Joined: Oct 2, 2007
    Posts: 3,694

    hrm2k
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I've posted this before but this thread is where it should be
     
  18. Mike Rouse
    Joined: Aug 12, 2004
    Posts: 364

    Mike Rouse
    Member

    Great idea!
     
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  19. 64 DODGE 440
    Joined: Sep 2, 2006
    Posts: 4,135

    64 DODGE 440
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from so cal

    Damn cool solution to an ages old problem!
     
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  20. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 4,152

    Boneyard51
    Member

    Cables are used on a lot of items, we had tons of them on fire trucks and they were a bitch to change, some being 20 + ft long. I took a 2 ft pice of hose and put a air valve in like in your car tire, in one end. I put a clamp on the other end. I would clamp the hose over the cable housing, making a seal. I would unscrew the air valve and fill the hose, first with diesel fuel, the screw the valve back in , hold the hose up and apply air pressure. This would push the diesel fuel through tThe housing flushing out dirt and crap. Then I would refill the hose with oil and again apply air. Usually the cables would work better than when new! This method could be adapted to most any cable with a coated housing. My cables had seals on both ends and depending on the conditions of the seals, some times. I would have to insert a straight pin under the seal to hold it up, allowing the oil to bypass the seal.
    This can be used on many applications, but does not work so great on the spring steel uncoated cables. But it does help even on those.


    Note, while this works great..... it does make a mess! Lol







    Bones
     
  21. here is an oil pump pick up tool I made out of an old chevy fuel pump push rod and a 5/8 inch steel rod collar clamp. works great and only cost 6 bucks.

    IMG_2489 (1).jpg IMG_2493.jpg IMG_2497 (1).jpg IMG_2499.jpg
     
  22. Nostrebor
    Joined: Jun 25, 2014
    Posts: 1,053

    Nostrebor
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Mike you big tease...

    Please elaborate on how you attached the cutting board to the steel? It almost looks like you melted the material for these and recast them in place, but I can't tell.
     
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  23. Mike Rouse
    Joined: Aug 12, 2004
    Posts: 364

    Mike Rouse
    Member

    Ok here is how to attach HDPE or other plastic to steel. I have only worked with HDPE cutting board 1/2” thick. I have some carpet tack strip nails used to attach the strips to concrete floors. These nails are 1/8”in diameter and about 5/8” long. In order to attach the nail to the steel I drilled a 1/8” hole insert the nail till the top of the head is about 3/16” above the steel surface then weld the nail stick out to the steel. The best way is to grind the nails flush and tig weld all flat. Looks better. Now the fun part. Heat the steel up till it turns blue about 520 degrees F. Carefully place the steel on to the hdpe that is on the bench. The hdpe will melt as the nail heads touch the hdpe. Press the two together till the steel touches the Hdpe. It will melt to a liquid as the nails displace the hdpe. This is very hot use gloves to do this. Alignment is the trick here practice placing the two together. If the steel looks ok t will go into the hdpe too far you can put water on the steel to cool it all down and stop the melting caution the plastic stays very warm a long time. Thermal conductivity is low. Now that describes the flat steel.
    the handle starts out as a piece of 1” x 3/16” flat bar. The part that is to receive the hdpe handle is cut narrow to about 5/8” to 3/4”. 3/8” holes are drilled about 1” apart along this length. 2 pieces of hdpe are cut oversized. Pick a nice handle you like and trace the shape. Cut oversized 3/8”. Place one piece on the bench good idea to place long finishing nails 2 per side to hold the piece in place put the nails outsid of the piece not through the piece. Now heat th steel to blue. Position the hot steel on to the piece on the bench then place the second half on top to make a pile. Then press pretty hard the pile together the hdpe will melt and come out petween the pieces welding the hdpe as it moves out clamp will make it easier. Belt sanders and draw filing will be needed to shape the final shape. In order to final smooth the hdpe use a heat gun on high to melt the surface just a little to smooth the surface.
    Hope this helps let me know how you did.
    Mike
     

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  24. Nostrebor
    Joined: Jun 25, 2014
    Posts: 1,053

    Nostrebor
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Thank you very much for sharing!
     
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  25. Mike Rouse
    Joined: Aug 12, 2004
    Posts: 364

    Mike Rouse
    Member

    You are welcome. If you want more info just ask.
    Mike
     
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  26. Nostrebor
    Joined: Jun 25, 2014
    Posts: 1,053

    Nostrebor
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Does the HDPE stretch metal on dolly, or is it enough cushion to just move it? What is the primary benefit over steel?

    I have never even considered making body dollies or hammers this way, but it seems like a way to manipulate/control stretch over using a steel tool. Maybe everybody but me already knows about this trick.:)
     
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  27. Mike Rouse
    Joined: Aug 12, 2004
    Posts: 364

    Mike Rouse
    Member

    HDPE is too soft to smash steel so it can’t stretch by smashing. I use it to smooth lumps using a dolly on the opposite side. As another little trick I use smooth river rocks as dollies. They come in infinite shapes and sizes. One will be just right for the job. The HDPE will not mark aluminum or steel
    Mike
     
  28. ekimneirbo
    Joined: Apr 29, 2017
    Posts: 1,357

    ekimneirbo
    Member
    from Brooks Ky

    Finally finished the parts cleaning tank I was making. What seemed like a quick and simple project turned out to be far more work than I thought. What looked like a great large leakfree box turned out to have a bottom seam that leaked profusely. Decided that welding the bottom seam solid was the way to go. It had a folded edge next to a flat bottom, so welding it was a little difficult. It didn't want to stay flat against the bottom as it absorbed heat from the weld.....and I was using my Tig. Also, the paint/powder coat(?) was between the two components and made welding difficult. After welding the bottom, I decided to flip it over and also weld the inside corners and double weld the bottom to side wall junctions. This time I used my Mig. Took it out and tested it......had a few leaks. Put some more weld where I thought the leaks were. Tested, welded again. Tested, welded yet again. Getting my but whipped and feeling like Wiley Coyote, I persevered on. Hooked up my sandblaster which immediatedly clogged. Cleaned the blaster and got almost all the inside seams/welds to bare metal. Declogged sandblaster again. Did I mention it was 95 degrees and humid? Managed to get all the seams/welds blasted. By now I only had a couple very small seep drips. Bought some Por 15 tank sealer and painted it on the seams with a brush. Put several coats on and tilted tank so it would settle in seams. After two days, flipped tank upside down and put Por 15 on the bottom seam. Waited two more days and then painted the tank with Massey Furguson Gray from tractor supply. I made a flat piece of steel to sit in the bottom of the tank and insure I didn't poke a hole thru the bottom when flipping heavy parts around. Also forgot to mention I welded a plug on the tank before all the sealing, so I can drain the tank if necessary.

    The reason for all this information is that I want anyone who considers building one of these, check the bottom of any job box you buy before you buy it. Most likely just cleaning the paint/powder coat off the seams and using Por 15 right from the beginning would work. Check with water before filling it with any cleaning liquid. I bought diesel fuel and put 45 gallons in. I want to sit an engine block in it before adding any more. There is room for more I think, but will check since I think whats in there may be enough. All I can say is that I now have a really nice cleaning tank with a lid. One of my problems was that because I assumed it was watertight, I welded the legs on first which prevented access to welding the corners outside or applying the Por 15 outside. Check for leaks before putting any legs in place.

    So anyway thats my story on how NOT to build a cleaning tank.......but now that its done I have a nice tool for my shop.
    DSCN2288.JPG
    DSCN2259.JPG
    DSCN2337.JPG
    DSCN2340.JPG
    DSCN2294.JPG
    DSCN2293.JPG
    DSCN2295.JPG
     
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  29. ekimneirbo
    Joined: Apr 29, 2017
    Posts: 1,357

    ekimneirbo
    Member
    from Brooks Ky

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  30. stanlow69
    Joined: Feb 21, 2010
    Posts: 4,533

    stanlow69
    Member
    from red oak

    My paint can shaker. Powered by a sawzall and attatched to my pallet rack. . IMG_20200608_0002.jpg
     

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