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home made tools and equipment...

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by kustombuilder, Jan 16, 2008.

  1. Sporty45
    Joined: Jun 1, 2015
    Posts: 630

    Sporty45
    Member
    from NH Boonies

    Wow, that is heavy duty! I used 2 engine stands to twirl my frame around, but don't have plans to try to do it with the body on. I made a wooden body dolly to put the body on and it's high enough to get under the body to work on the floors.

    IMG_20171126_151625445.jpg
     
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  2. mgtstumpy
    Joined: Jul 20, 2006
    Posts: 7,270

    mgtstumpy
    Member

    Not light, overkill maybe. You could put a 1960 Cadillac on it or my late model SUV without any issues once you put the lower beams in to hold it together.:D
     
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  3. 1946caddy
    Joined: Dec 18, 2013
    Posts: 1,399

    1946caddy
    Member
    from washington

    Good luck trying to push a full size caddy around on those little wheels.
     
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  4. Sporty45
    Joined: Jun 1, 2015
    Posts: 630

    Sporty45
    Member
    from NH Boonies

    If you are talking about my body dolly above, I agree, and that is why I upgraded the wheels on it! :p

    IMG_20180708_155713631.jpg
     
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  5. vtx1800
    Joined: Oct 4, 2009
    Posts: 802

    vtx1800
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I needed a way to roll the body shell of the Studebaker around the shop while I restored/painted the frame so I took holey angle and bolted it together and added four wheels, it was easy to roll outside if I wanted to work on it outside and ...... I didn't have a rotisserie so when I wanted to blast the under side of the body and paint it I just used the cherry picker to pick it up and roll it on it's side. The first time I picked it up I thought it was going to roll right over. That is a pucker moment. I called my neighbor while I stood on the cherry picker and he came up, stood on the cherry picker and it just rolled a little further and stopped. Cheap and it worked:) Your results might vary. IMG_1793.JPG
     
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  6. Bird man
    Joined: Dec 28, 2009
    Posts: 417

    Bird man
    Member
    from Milwaukee

    Made a tool for Trico Vacuum motors, just sawed off a driver bit and carved the socket with a Dremel.
     

    Attached Files:

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  7. Boulderdash
    Joined: Jul 24, 2009
    Posts: 125

    Boulderdash
    Member

    Wanted to share a few shots of my bead roller project. Its funny. After looking on here and getting some great design ideas, I thought I'd take the plunge and started on it back in early November. I thought, "meh, take two or three weekends and it'll be finished..". Now its Spring and I'm still building it!! Should have the external 3/16" keyways cut in the shafts for the sprockets and die bosses by the end of the week.

    I used a mobility scooter motor and all the wiring and switch/ESC gubbins, and a cheap 42T mini-moto sprocket to get some extra gear reduction. Good thing about using a mobility scooter is you can reverse it too. Plan is to make it compatible with the TIG welder foot pedal I already, so I can just swap it over.

    Here's a few recent shots. Still plenty more to do, remember, it isn't finished yet!

    IMG_2318.JPG
    DSCN2527.JPG
    DSCN2693.JPG
     
  8. gatz
    Joined: Jun 2, 2011
    Posts: 1,350

    gatz
    Member

    I made this anvil around 1972. The college had a bunch of surplus rail from somewhere and was free.
    Couldn't pass that up.

    Anvil_1.JPG


    The horn was turned as a taper in a lathe with a center in the tip of it (later ground off) and a center in the back end where the red line is.

    Anvil_2_a.jpg

    Anvil_5.JPG

    The "hardy hole" was drilled, then a 1/2" square tool-bit gradually forced into it shearing it out to size
     
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  9. Mart
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 3,435

    Mart
    Member

    I like that little anvil. I have a bit of railroad track. Hmmmm.

    Edit: Forgot to say: I have a lathe too....

    Mart.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2019
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  10. I would like to see how you chucked that up in a lathe.
     
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  11. gatz
    Joined: Jun 2, 2011
    Posts: 1,350

    gatz
    Member

    It was turned between centers, not "chucked" on a big ol' American lathe.
    I just kinda guessed where the center shown by the red line would be.

    There was a dead center in the headstock, might've used a couple of MT adapters to get far enough out for the part to clear a face plate.
    A bolt was fastened to the spindle-mounted faceplate to act as a driver.
    A big live center was in the tail-stock where the small end would be, and with a lot of pressure holding the part.
    It definitely clunked and chunked, so I took light cuts.
     
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  12. Boulderdash
    Joined: Jul 24, 2009
    Posts: 125

    Boulderdash
    Member

    Nice! Nice and slow speed too I hope
     
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  13. dirty old man
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 7,998

    dirty old man
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Did you cut it using the compound? Or is it possible to offset that far between centers?
     
  14. gatz
    Joined: Jun 2, 2011
    Posts: 1,350

    gatz
    Member

    Used the compound
     
  15. dirty old man
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 7,998

    dirty old man
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    That's a lot of turning that little handle, but I guess even then it's better than just about any other way to cut that taper, nice work.
    I was lucky on an anvil. About 60-65 years ago the grandfather of an old friend and schoolmate started getting rid of a bunch of farm tools, and he sold me a 75 pounder for IIRC, $5.00
     
  16. J. A. Miller
    Joined: Dec 30, 2010
    Posts: 1,140

    J. A. Miller
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Central NY

    Dave, it's too bad those days are gone forever, I sure miss them!
     
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  17. dirty old man
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 7,998

    dirty old man
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Yep, they're gone now. The old anvil has, as most old ones do, a lot of top wear and the edges are battered up with few square corners left.
    I've got a 200 amp MIG welder and I've been told on a welding forum that I can use just ordinary mild steel wire to build up the edges and top, and then I'm sure if I cut with slow surface speed on the Bridgeport I now have in my shop, that I can restore it.
    I just can't seem to quit finding things to do on my hot rods that use up my time! Another "Round To It" job:)
     
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  18. GearheadsQCE
    Joined: Mar 23, 2011
    Posts: 2,069

    GearheadsQCE
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Here you go Dave!
    round_tuit_202.jpg
     
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  19. cretin
    Joined: Oct 10, 2006
    Posts: 2,855

    cretin
    Member
    from S.F.V. CA.

    Nothing ground breaking, but finally mounted this hook I made to the side of my work bench that slides out of the way when not in use.
    I made it for hanging my Dremel while using the flex cable attachment, but who knows what other uses it’ll find.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
  20. fiftyv8
    Joined: Mar 11, 2007
    Posts: 4,694

    fiftyv8
    Member
    from CO & WA

    You, Cretin are one smart cookie.
    I have the same issue and just keep putting up with it, but not any more.
    Well done and thanks for sharing.
     
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  21. Johnnyolds98
    Joined: Jul 6, 2009
    Posts: 109

    Johnnyolds98
    Member

    That script "Seeburg" is of a German record machine of the late 50ies, very comparable to a Rockola.
     
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  22. cretin
    Joined: Oct 10, 2006
    Posts: 2,855

    cretin
    Member
    from S.F.V. CA.

    I knew it was off a jukebox.
    It was on the workbench when I got it. I got the bench from a member off here.


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
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  23. Nothing real special, but I used it just the other day. I was replacing axle seals on a Ford 9 inch that the vent hose had been broken off of for ... well, who knows how long. The LH axle tube was full of crud that got in over time. Years ago I spent a lot of time working on 4X4s and the front axle tubes were always full of crap and I didn't want to push that inside when reinstalling an axle so I made a scraper to clean out the tubes. Simply a piece of 3/8 steel tubing with a couple of different size washers welded to the ends. Put the small end in first and scrape out the crud and then use the larger end to clean things up a little better. If that isn't clean enough you can put a solvent soaked rag on the small end and polish things up real nice.
     
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  24. Mart
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 3,435

    Mart
    Member

    Inspired by the anvil posted above, I had a go at making my take on the concept of an anvil. I used my trusty 4x6 bandsaw to do the bulk of the work. I just posted up a video on YouTube. Let me know what you think. It's a bit simpler than the one above, but was a learning curve for me. I sort of made it up as I went along.

    I haven't posted up the milling video(s) yet, I have to do a bit of editing.

    Anvil Thumb.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

  25. Nice work.
    I have a 5 ft piece of rail, but I don't have a metal cutting band saw to do the cutting to make an anvil. I use the bottom side of the rail to do all my pounding. I am tempted to make one, but I have too many projects on the go, and can't afford the time right now.
    Bob
     
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  26. rtp
    Joined: Aug 14, 2007
    Posts: 117

    rtp
    Member

    Two of the anvil I have made this #5and6 . 0804181646c_Film1.jpeg

    Sent from my VS987 using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  27. Mart
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 3,435

    Mart
    Member

    They look great, rtp, can I ask what are the lengths of the body and horn for each one? (roughly if need be).
     
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  28. Mart
    Joined: Mar 3, 2001
    Posts: 3,435

    Mart
    Member

    I've added the videos covering the milling on the little anvil, for anyone that might be interested.
    Part 2:
    Part 3:
    Part 4:
    Mart.
     
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  29. woodbutcher
    Joined: Apr 25, 2012
    Posts: 3,069

    woodbutcher
    Member

    :D Hi Mart.Very interesting. Nice work.Thanks for posting.
    Good luck.Have fun.Be safe.
    Leo
     
  30. ekimneirbo
    Joined: Apr 29, 2017
    Posts: 151

    ekimneirbo
    Member
    from Brooks Ky

    Paint 9 Outside.JPG Sandblast 1.JPG I've seen a lot of nice ideas on here and I have some homemade and modified tools that I want to share too. I think the idea of having a shop that suits your needs is where "toolarizing" should begin. Its hard to know just what you will need, or to "see the future". The thing is, if someone thinks things thru, they can set up a shop that really works for their needs. The initial expense of a shop often forces people to cut corners, but if you watch for the things you need, and actively search for them, you can build a better shop. In my shop I have two overhead cranes. It took a lot of time and effort to build them, but next to my welder I would not trade them for any other tool I have. I use them constantly, and the enable me to do so many many things. Sometimes you can find good deals at auctions but you have to have a way to remove them. Mine were cobbled from stuff I bought at auctions and Craigs list, so it can be done...even on a piecemeal basis. A simple overhead beam will enable you to do a lot. Two overhead beams help even more. I can Pick up a truck cab and set it on a dolley by myself in a few minutes. A complete truck fram can move from floor to welding table in a few minutes. My son just bought a small farm and it has a couple of nice buildings on it. We are in the process of erecting some 6x6 H beams in one of them. I'll include the pics as its a project underway.
    Also, in his other building we are going to erect an overhead crane in there too. The building came with a concrete floor and a two post lift already in place. We are going to use the posts for the lift to support some brackets that will hold the middle of his 4" I Beams. At one end we will attach the beams to some pallet racking. Haven't decided if we
    will need to brace it or not. The other end of the I beams will have a traditional crossbeam with a post on each side bolted to the floor. Started accumulating some of the materials but haven't started building it yet. One of the cranes I have in my shop is mounted in conjunction with a two post lift but I did not use the lift as part of its support because at the time I had some other steel supports available. I actually moved that one from my attached garage to my pole
    barn one I finished erecting the pole barn.The point here is that you can have a good shop and some very useful tools if you work at it instead of dream about it. Most everything you see, including the pole barn its housed in are the result of effort, not hiring it done.You can do it if you make up your mind to do it.
    The first thing I'll show you is my almost finished Storage/Paint Booth combo. Everyone hates overspray. I decided to build a small 16x32 metal building and set it for painting too. I will only store things that are easy to roll outside, maybe even a project car. The point is that I built the building and planned ahead to use it for painting too. It has plenty of light, pretty airtight, and a compressor assembled from parts and placed in an alcove on the front of the building. I installed a filtered intake vent in the ceiling to downdraft. I used to small drums mounted at the rear of the building down near the floor and run thru the rear wall. I can place the drum lids on the exhausts when not in use to keep the building sealed. Outside on the back of the building I put a leanto. I have a paint shaker sitting on a table out there. I will take two squirrel cage blowers and adapt them to the outside of the drums to pull exhaust air out. I'm using ones where the air flows thru the blower without passing around the electric motor. Hope that prevents any explosions..... Paint 5 Outside.JPG Paint 6 Compressor.JPG Paint 7 Separator.JPG Paint 1.JPG DSCN0905.JPG DSCN0841.JPG DSCN0906.JPG Paint 3 Outside intake.JPG Paint 2 Vent.JPG
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2019

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