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holley 94 CFM rateing?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Kona Cruisers, Mar 18, 2007.

  1. Kona Cruisers
    Joined: Feb 4, 2007
    Posts: 1,071

    Kona Cruisers
    Member

    did search just curious if any one knows the flow rate of a holley 94? Im guessing around 300 but if anyone knows the true number that be great! thanks
     
  2. swimeasy
    Joined: Oct 17, 2006
    Posts: 1,067

    swimeasy
    Member

    I have always heard that the 94s and the 97s both flow about 150 cfm.
     
  3. dirthawker1313
    Joined: Apr 18, 2005
    Posts: 648

    dirthawker1313
    Member

    i belive its 125 cfm
     
  4. dickster27
    Joined: Feb 28, 2004
    Posts: 3,062

    dickster27
    Member
    from Texas

    A standard 94 is rated at 185. The biggest is rated at 310 CFM. That is the rare list #3903 performance 94. There are other ratings between these 2 for the 2100 and 2110's. It is a little known fact that the Holley/Ford 94 series has a quite a varied line of similar carburetors with a lot of applications available because of so many interchangable internal parts.
     
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  5. S.F.
    Joined: Oct 19, 2006
    Posts: 2,891

    S.F.
    Member

    So, if you are going to run tri power or more, which are the best 94's to get??????
     
  6. dickster27
    Joined: Feb 28, 2004
    Posts: 3,062

    dickster27
    Member
    from Texas

    That depends intirely on the engine under your intake. A stock 239 flatty would run dejetted 94 trips and a built 350 Chevy could use the big boys with some stepped on work. That's why I say the 94 is a very versitile carburetor.
    the Dickster
     
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  7. Kona Cruisers
    Joined: Feb 4, 2007
    Posts: 1,071

    Kona Cruisers
    Member

    [FONT=arial,helvetica]"All 94 carbs flow about 165 - 175 cfm. The larger 1" and 1 1/16" ECG flow up to about 210 cfm"


    got this from vintage speed after an email to them.
    [/FONT]
     
  8. dickster27
    Joined: Feb 28, 2004
    Posts: 3,062

    dickster27
    Member
    from Texas

    And what did Charlie say about the 1 5/32" model?
     
  9. George
    Joined: Jan 1, 2005
    Posts: 7,019

    George
    Member

    94-59 155, 94-8BA 162, ECG 185. How big is the engine?
     
  10. Bruce Lancaster
    Joined: Oct 9, 2001
    Posts: 21,683

    Bruce Lancaster
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    To pick a nit, this is the Holley AA series of carbs...94 is .94 is the bore size, so all 94's are....94. There are minor casting variations and several variant nozzle bars, but all flows are naturally pretty similar.
    Size on back, like .94, or 1, or whatever tells you size of bore, info on Left of bowl on Ford ones (59, 7RT, etc.) is the Ford part number prefix, not only designating use but leading you to a catalog char listing out all the bits making up that carb. There are a LOT of sizes in the area above .94, including some Lincoln variants, and a 7/8" .81 that Holley designated the AA-7/8, used on '39-40 V8-60's.
     
  11. strombergs97
    Joined: May 22, 2006
    Posts: 1,888

    strombergs97
    Member
    from California

    Hello..If your going to use a 94..The 2100 & 2110, I would say are the best..
    My 5cents
    Duane.
     
  12. Paul2748
    Joined: Jan 8, 2003
    Posts: 2,033

    Paul2748
    Member

    There is an ECW (may also be a 2110) 1 1/16 Venturi, 1 3/8 butterflies, 2 1/4 choke throat - 205 cfm. ECG- 185
     
  13. Does anyone just have the CFM figures for all of the Strombergs? 48's?, 81's, 97's, 94's, ww's etc... ( including small holleys & fords, let alone rochesters, carters) It would be nice to know when I'm looking for a 3 carb, 4-carb or 6 carb manifold and can't afford 97's. Also 3 bolt or 4 bolt bases? I'm picking up 1 barrel strombergs around here for free. So what do they flow? Is anyone looking for them?

    Someone please: Just give us a web-site or a prior thread to look at.

    I keep seeing the repeat of these type of questions. Yes I COULD DO A SEARCH but beig a FNG....Could these questions be posted/aswered in TECH ?
     
  14. Kona Cruisers
    Joined: Feb 4, 2007
    Posts: 1,071

    Kona Cruisers
    Member

    going on a "secret project".. more of a modern BIG BIG engine meets vintage look and there might be the number 8 in the number of carbs...!
     
  15. George
    Joined: Jan 1, 2005
    Posts: 7,019

    George
    Member

    Can add a couple St 48 175, 81 135, LZ 160. Holly 92 142
     
  16. BashingTin
    Joined: Feb 15, 2010
    Posts: 270

    BashingTin
    Member

    Sorry to resurrect such on old thread, but I'm hoping some of you will know the answer to this question:

    Are the CFM estimates of these old carbs based on the 3" of mercury depression normally used to rate 2BBL carbs? Or are these estimates based on the 1.5" mercury depression typically used for rating 4BBL carbs?

    I ask only so I can make good calculations with corrections for CFM ratings.

    Thanks in advance everyone for your time.

    David
     
  17. Truckedup
    Joined: Jul 25, 2006
    Posts: 3,844

    Truckedup
    Member

    Generally one and two barrels are rated at 3 inches.I believe the conversion is about .7 ,meaning 3 2 barrels with a combined cfm of 600 equals a 420 cfm 4 barrel.
    Are the cfm ratings for these old carbs at 3 inches? Not sure but probably.And most carbs can exceed their cfm ratings in certain situations
     
  18. BashingTin
    Joined: Feb 15, 2010
    Posts: 270

    BashingTin
    Member

    Thanks Truckedup! I was hoping 3" was the case. I got confirmation for this same question on another forum as well (Thanks George!!!!!).

    For others that may not know about the different depression pressures they rate the CFM flow of carbs, the conversion factor is 0.7071 for a two barrel compared to a four. An example would be:

    A two barrel carburetor that has an advertised factory flow rating of 500 CFM's at 3" of mercury would be equivalent to a four barrel with a factory rating of 353.55 CFM's at 1.5" of mercury (500 x 0.7071). A clearer formula would be: (CFM rating of two barrel) x (0.7071) = (Equivalent CFM flow rating of a four barrel).

    So if you have say... 6 Holley 8ba 94's that flow at 162 CFM's, that would be equivalent to having a single four barrel that had an advertised flow rating of approximately 687.3 CFM's (162 x 6 x 0.7071). In theory anyway! :p

    I hope that all made sense.

    Take care all!

    David
     
  19. George
    Joined: Jan 1, 2005
    Posts: 7,019

    George
    Member

    One thing that is in the Tex Smith hemi book that isn't really answered satisfactorily is...is the 3" the minimum that the old 2 bls can pull, or is it an aribtrarily set amount that might not be right in the real world. In the book it was saying @ 3" a 97 is 150 CFM, @ 1.5", like a 4 bl, it would be 229. But it doesn't say if 3" is all it can pull, or if it is actually 1.5 or somewhere in between.

     
  20. BashingTin
    Joined: Feb 15, 2010
    Posts: 270

    BashingTin
    Member

    Hi George,

    What you just said I've read in Tex Smith's Early Hemi book (page 70), and what Jere Jobe says makes no sense to me. He says, "Stromberg 97's flow around 150 CFM at 3.0 inches of mercury (the value at which they were originally rated). However, Jere points out that had they been tested at the more contemporary value of 1.5-inches of mercury the rating would be higher, around 229 CFM."

    The impression I get from his words is that if you DECREASE the pressure of air passing into the carb, it will flow more air. I don't think that's correct. My logic tells me that you need to INCREASE the depression (pressure) to push or pull the air through an orifice to pass more air through that orifice. I think this is a mistake in the book.

    Now, to complicate things even more, one and two barrel carbs are designed to work correctly at those higher depression levels. 3" of depression "is the lowest volume of air flowing over the emulsion tube tips that will draw the proper quantity of fuel up through the main metering jets and mix it in the venturi." "Most four-barrel carburetors require only 1.5" of mercury to perform correctly." I agree with this statement from author Ron Ceridono (straight from the book page 65).

    Of course I could be completely wrong. Still a fantastic Book with tons of invaluable information about the early Hemi's..... ;)

    David
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2011
  21. falcongeorge
    Joined: Aug 26, 2010
    Posts: 18,341

    falcongeorge
    Member
    from BC

    Old post, but it deserves an answer. You are right, and that is why I take pretty much everything in that book with a big grain of salt. The sheer volume of pure unadulterated bullshit that gets into print in these books is astounding. I had been wondering about the pressure drop those often bandied about flow numbers were taken at, one of the guys on Speedtalk tested a holley 94 for me at 1.5" (I have a flow bench but no 3-bolt carbs. Yes, thats right, I am a dreaded "musclecar guy":p) and it flowed around 160 cfm, which indicates that these numbers are taken at 1.5".

    Correction: the 94 in question flowed 176@1.5"
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2013
  22. falcongeorge
    Joined: Aug 26, 2010
    Posts: 18,341

    falcongeorge
    Member
    from BC

    Sending you a pm.
     
  23. vince89
    Joined: Mar 23, 2014
    Posts: 159

    vince89
    Member

    sorry to be another one reviving this old thread ;) i want to say. very helpfull and made up my decision to buy 4 holley 94,s i have seen up for sale. and Always nice to learn a thing or two
     
  24. Butch Iuele
    Joined: Jan 9, 2018
    Posts: 4

    Butch Iuele

    Hello gentlemen. My questions... I have a stock 327 with 650 cfm edelbrock carb. I'd like to put a 3x2 tripower on it without doing a cam or vales at this time. I'm looking at older holly setup with 3 holly 2110. Will they equal the 650cfm? After reading about the 3" or 1.5" mercury draw, should I get a new holly set up? I think the current set up being offered is 1000cfm. Made up from 350 cfm and 325cfm outboards. Sometimes it pays to experiment but at those prices, I'd like to try to measure twice and cut once. Any help is appreciated
     
  25. George
    Joined: Jan 1, 2005
    Posts: 7,019

    George
    Member

    "Carb King" said that on a 2X4 set up you probably can't get better than 80% of rated CFM due to various inefficiencies & it gets worse as the number of carbs increase.
     

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