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"Hidden" power steering

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by weps, Dec 29, 2013.

  1. weps
    Joined: Aug 1, 2008
    Posts: 554

    weps
    Member
    from auburn,IN

    I am looking for info and comments on using a module like the chevy cobalt/HHR unit on my Auburn. Luckily, the cowl is fairly long, and I think that I may be able to hide it fairly well.
    I have seen photos of these units, but does anyone know how simple the wiring to these are?(I.E. does the drivetrain computer limit force at speed)
    or can that be eliminated?
     
  2. indyjps
    Joined: Feb 21, 2007
    Posts: 4,839

    indyjps
    Member

    I'm not familiar with the HHR power steering, why not just mount a normal pump down low and route the lines so they are out of sight? You can run a remote reservior as well to further hide it.
     
  3. I'm sure it would have a "module" of some sort. Might have speed sensor input split off from the drive train computer. If you can get your hands on a wiring diagram, that might answer your question.
    It would be real sweet if you can get enough info to make it work!
     
  4. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 19,925

    gimpyshotrods
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    It is driven by the powertrain control module, with an input from the vehicle speed sensor. By no means a stand-alone unit.
     

  5. Hackerbilt
    Joined: Aug 13, 2001
    Posts: 6,253

    Hackerbilt
    Member

    Cobalt steering is absolute garbage. They were recalled..bro in law had his covered...went again in a year and a half, now it's his coin paying for it.
    It's totally selfcontained. Makes it easy to toss...

    Early vehicles were proud of their mechanical brilliance...so don't hide stuff. FLAUNT it!
     
  6. redo32
    Joined: Jul 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,949

    redo32
    Member

    January 2012 Street Rodder mag, Uni-Steer electric power steering. Bolt in, plug & play.
     
  7. 63comet
    Joined: Jan 31, 2006
    Posts: 508

    63comet
    Member

    There's a thread here about such things.

    http://www.tffn.net/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=32444

    I'm interested in such a thing as I like the idea of not having to change my steering linkages or adding anything to my engine.


    I didn't realize you can't view the forum without being a member, oops.

    Anyway, Saturn Vue unit? Along with a few others, tere is a guy on eBay selling a box to replace the factory ECM unit to make it possible to retrofit the assist units to other cars. Makes it whee you just have a knob to dial in the amount of assist you want?
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2013
  8. redo32
    Joined: Jul 16, 2008
    Posts: 1,949

    redo32
    Member

    Holey Crap!!! Had no idea they cost that much!
     
  9. Tinman
    Joined: Mar 6, 2001
    Posts: 963

    Tinman
    Member
    from Orange, CA

    Early 90's Toyota MR2 pump is electric and mates nicely with a Maval Unisteer /late 80's Ford Thunderbird rack & pinion. I've done one on an oddball Triumph Mayflower build where space limitations prevented a conventional pump and the owners age and physical abilities necessitated power steering.

    Oh yeah, and no goofy ECM interface, just 12v and go.
     
  10. Ford is using an electric power steering pump on some of their current offerings, might be worth a look....
     
  11. There's a system for ATVs that's almost universal.
    The guy from the company posted a thread about 3-4 months ago.
    Runs 600.00 ish I think.
     
  12. 63comet
    Joined: Jan 31, 2006
    Posts: 508

    63comet
    Member

    The modern electric units look like a window motor mounted inline on the column. Apparently the complicated bit is controlling them.

    The boxes the egay guy sells work as a controller, beyond that you can make it happen with junkyard parts.

    The advantage is that everything is under the dash.

    I don't see an advantage if switching from a traditional hydraulic system to the modern electric systems but it is less moving parts to install if retrofitting.
     
  13. Kiwi 4d
    Joined: Sep 16, 2006
    Posts: 3,237

    Kiwi 4d
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Yes early Toyota mr2 electric power steering pumps are used lots down under , in hot rods and track cars. Can be hidden anywhere and just fit a separate reservoir as the early units don't have the reservoir attached. Will work on a box or rack.
     
  14. 63comet
    Joined: Jan 31, 2006
    Posts: 508

    63comet
    Member

    Sorry.... Thought I'd figured out a working link.

    Apparently you can't read threads at TFFN without being a member.

    There is a really good thread going on over there about adapting electric power steering to older cars. The key element seems to be the control box of which there are some very affordable options available.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2013
  15. gnichols
    Joined: Mar 6, 2008
    Posts: 11,114

    gnichols
    Member
    from Tampa, FL

  16. expavr
    Joined: Jul 28, 2006
    Posts: 78

    expavr

    Attached is a photo of a Unisteer electrical power steering unit on my 33 Imperial. The Unisteer unit and control module cost $950. Misc hardware $100. Labor for bracket fabrication and mounting for both the steering unit and the module and electrical wiring $1500. Total cost $2500. These units are heat sensitive and need to be mounted away from heat sources or where there is good air flow for cooling. On the 33 we were able to locate it on the frame ahead of the headers. It has performed flawlessly in the stop and go SoCal traffic in 90* weather. One of the goals of this build was to leave the 392 uncluttered with belts and pulleys which the "hidden" Unisteer unit makes possible.
     

    Attached Files:

  17. Took me a long ass time to find it. Especially since it was deleted.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=hamb+Atv+sterring&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en&client=safari
    It was the first hit.

    We actually develop these Electric Power Steering kits here at SuperATV. Mainly for ATV's and UTV's, but we have a lot of guys buying our universal kit and putting them on cars for $650. If you have any questions just look up SuperATV and ask for Jeremy.

    Here you go
    http://www.superatv.com/Universal-Power-Steering-Kit-P5150C1039.aspx
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2014
  18. weps
    Joined: Aug 1, 2008
    Posts: 554

    weps
    Member
    from auburn,IN

    Last edited: Dec 31, 2013
  19. Ford in 60's Nascar ran the power sterring pump off the rear drive shaft pinnion - had a pulley in between the ujoint yoke and pumpkin and the pump off a braket - belt driven....there's pics....not sure if that helps....
     
  20. Doesn't do much good for parking, when you need it most.

    Some pumps run off the starter ring gear, hidden from view
     
  21. Hnstray
    Joined: Aug 23, 2009
    Posts: 12,306

    Hnstray
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Quincy, IL


    As I recall, those driveshaft pinion driven pumps were for recirculating differential lube to keep the rear gears cooler......not related to power steering at all.
     
  22. Hackerbilt
    Joined: Aug 13, 2001
    Posts: 6,253

    Hackerbilt
    Member

    I'm amazed that people are so willing to spend big dollars and/or the time to "hide" something as unintrusive as a power steering pump.
    It's not needed at all on the early cars with their narrow hoods or open engines, and the later cars and fat fenders have so much room that removing it from the engine can hardly be accepted as being a need for additional clearance...ESPECIALLY if the electric unit is mounted under the dash where space IS at a premium!

    Are the electric units better somehow or simply a new way to jump on the "trick of the month" bandwagon?
     
  23. blowby
    Joined: Dec 27, 2012
    Posts: 8,307

    blowby
    Member
    from Nicasio Ca

    What will they think of next. So, if you turn your key on, can you power steer the car without starting the engine? Weird. If it looses current while driving, does it steer like an engine driven unit with the engine off?
     
  24. OEM sees value in the electric system. It's not a trick of the month for them.
    Atv, utv, and some personal water craft utilize it instead of nothing.
     
  25. That EPAS unit at$1350 is much more affordable than the Flaming River unit. Still pretty expensive but there are some applications where a unit like this might be desirable. Vehicles that swapping a non assist box for a powered unit isn't possible or desirable for instance. I can also see doing this to keep underhood clutter to a minimum or where adding a PS pump to the engine just isn't easy (flathead for instance). But hiding one under dash might be just as troublesome.
     
  26. Exactly, spinning one alternator or electrical generating device is more efficient than an Alternator and a PS pump and in more cases now the AC system too.

    When trying to increase efficiency every little bit adds up.
     
  27. gnichols
    Joined: Mar 6, 2008
    Posts: 11,114

    gnichols
    Member
    from Tampa, FL

    ^Bill, I think they are superior, based on my current late model daily. It has great feel / feedback and I suspect most folks couldn't tell / aren't even aware of the difference. My 27 truck weighs about 2800lbs and is a tad tail heavy. Yet it steers like the proverbial dump truck at low speeds. I'm working on a conventional Vega-power installation on it now. Retro fitting an electric unit at this point would be a nightmare in re-engineering and wiring.

    But on a new build I'm hoping to take advantage of things like (I hope!) having a shorter column assembly behind the dash that would, in turn, give you some better angles on the steering shaft(s) around the pedals, where it pokes thru the firewall and around the exhaust. I see the cost as a wash for the most part, the new stuff versus the cost of a power rack, the pump / mount, reservoir, etc..

    At this point, the only issues I've been concerned about are the high amp ratings these things have and, logically enough, what would happen if the little sucker looses power when I'm out on the road. Gary
     
  28. Hackerbilt
    Joined: Aug 13, 2001
    Posts: 6,253

    Hackerbilt
    Member

    I'm sure it has multiple benefits in some original applications!
    Thats not really the thing here.
    I just don't see the need to reapply the technology to "fix" something thats basicly unbroken. Seems its more the vanity of gaining an engine compartment unspoiled(?) by anything mechanical in nature.
    Whats next...electric waterpumps?

    Oh...wait...LoL
     

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