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Technical Help! 337 flathead oil problem.

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Cosmo 51, Apr 25, 2019.

  1. Cosmo 51
    Joined: Feb 17, 2019
    Posts: 5

    Cosmo 51

    I recently purchased a 1951 Lincoln Cosmopolitan with the 337. It runs but was missing on cylinder #3. Checked pressure and each was at 110 lbs, except #3 which had 90 lbs. replaced the spark plugs and it ran great on all 8. The only problem was that it began leaking a bit of oil from what looked like the middle of the exhaust manifold where the exhaust from #3 comes out. The cylinder head is dry. Any ideas? The car sat for 40 years and only has 64k miles.
     
  2. King ford
    Joined: Mar 18, 2013
    Posts: 1,152

    King ford
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from 08302

    Does it smoke?, make funny sounds?are all of the fluids staying where they belong and not co mingling?
     
  3. Rusty O'Toole
    Joined: Sep 17, 2006
    Posts: 8,925

    Rusty O'Toole
    Member

    Could it be spilled oil, or dripping down from somewhere? There should be no oil in an exhaust manifold to leak out. Do you mean the leak is near the place where the manifold bolts to the block?

    If oil pressure is good, compression is good, no funny noises, I would drive it but check the oil regularly and keep an eye on the leak. Chances are it is nothing. If it dries up fine. If it stays wet you may want to clean it off with brake kleen spray and inspect the area carefully to see exactly where it is leaking.
     
  4. Torana68
    Joined: Jan 28, 2008
    Posts: 1,038

    Torana68
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Australia

    You have a cylinder problem, was the plug you took out oil fouled?
     
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  5. Cosmo 51
    Joined: Feb 17, 2019
    Posts: 5

    Cosmo 51

    No smoke; water in the oil or oil in the water.
     
  6. Cosmo 51
    Joined: Feb 17, 2019
    Posts: 5

    Cosmo 51

    The oil is coming from the bottom of the manifold where it bolts to the block. Could it be a crack in the block? Oil pressure is good, but the compression in #3 is only 90 pounds, but it stays at 90 pounds and doesn’t decrease over time like I would expect from a leak.
     
  7. Cosmo 51
    Joined: Feb 17, 2019
    Posts: 5

    Cosmo 51

    The plugs I took out were all old and different kinds. The guy who sold me the car had done a lot of work to get it running. New gas tank, carb, electric fuel pump, etc. Those plugs are easy to replace, so I’m worried this will be a major problem.
     
  8. RichFox
    Joined: Dec 3, 2006
    Posts: 9,536

    RichFox
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Pull #3 plug and see if it is oily. This is not a cracked block. But might be stuck or worn rings. Lots of mechanic in a can products claim to free up rings, Try that and give it some time to free up.
     
  9. Rusty O'Toole
    Joined: Sep 17, 2006
    Posts: 8,925

    Rusty O'Toole
    Member

    Richfox is right. If oil is truly leaking out of the exhaust manifold the spark plug should be soaked and the plug not firing. Even if oil is coming out of the cylinder the manifold joint should be oil tight. I have seen a lot of oil burning engines, none had oil dripping out of the exhaust manifold. Smoke out the tail pipe, yes, black grease inside the tail pipe, yes, but not dripping out the manifold.
     
  10. RichFox
    Joined: Dec 3, 2006
    Posts: 9,536

    RichFox
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    There is a possibility that the previous owner put oil in that cylinder to free it when he was working on it. If so you may be seeing left over oil that will dry up shortly. You might ask him what he did.
     
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  11. BJR
    Joined: Mar 11, 2005
    Posts: 5,388

    BJR
    Member

    what RichFox said.
     
  12. s55mercury66
    Joined: Jul 6, 2009
    Posts: 3,253

    s55mercury66
    Member
    from SW Wyoming

    Sometimes, in my experience anyway, engines that have been sitting a long time will have what appear to be stuck rings in a cylinder or two, and running the engine will free them up, with compression readings returning to normal. A good look with a borescope helps me to see if the cylinder is scored or pitted, if I see either of those conditions I don't try to "heal" things by running the engine, if it is a motor I want to rebuild.
     
  13. sunbeam
    Joined: Oct 22, 2010
    Posts: 3,910

    sunbeam
    Member

    When you were trying to start it was it ever flooded? If it was it could be fuel that reacted with carbon kind of like wet stacking in diesels. No one has ask if you put oil in #3 to see if compression came up to check ring seal.
     

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