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Hot Rods Grounding battery to header bolt

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by F1 Ford, Dec 18, 2020.

  1. alanp561
    Joined: Oct 1, 2017
    Posts: 1,994

    alanp561
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Couldn't have said it better myself;)
     
    lothiandon1940 likes this.
  2. WB69
    Joined: Dec 7, 2008
    Posts: 1,780

    WB69
    Member

    Used to have some issues with slow starter spin until I did just that. There was definitely a noticeable difference for the better. Especially when the engine was hot.
     
    SlamIam and Boneyard51 like this.
  3. MAD MIKE
    Joined: Aug 1, 2009
    Posts: 691

    MAD MIKE
    Member
    from 94577

    Cylinder head stud bolts are common on later model GMs and Fords, I'm guessing Mopar used them too.
    Stud-bolt..jpg
    As you can see, it has the functionality of a normal bolt and the advantage of being able to attach another component or used as a grounding/bonding point.

    I would never suggest using the cylinder head bolt itself as a ground/bond attachment point.
     
  4. Starlinerdude
    Joined: Mar 6, 2008
    Posts: 152

    Starlinerdude
    Member
    from Washington

    In addition to the things already mentioned,since you have headers one of the solenoid heat shields may help.Does your engine have a big cam or some other tuning issue that requires excessive turns on the idle speed adjustment screw?If so this can also cause the starter to labor on hot start,I know it sounds counterproductive but in this case more initial timing can allow the idle adjustment screw to backed off to near minimum and allow quicker and easier starts.If the additional initial timing causes pinging or detonation problems then the mechanical advance will need to be recurved to bring the total back down or vacuum advance will have to be limited.
     
  5. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 5,360

    Boneyard51
    Member

    Ok! Great! We are on the same page now!








    Bones
     
  6. pitman
    Joined: May 14, 2006
    Posts: 5,151

    pitman

    In reply to earlier mention, the (+) side has two or three V-drop events, on the way back-to-earth. (-) So 0.3V does the job.
     
  7. I always thought you used dielectric grease on the "outside" of an otherwise clean and dry connector, to keep moisture and air from oxidizing it. I honestly haven't paid a lot attention to it, but it sounds like it's good advice for parts in harsh environments.

    I've never felt the need for it on my cars, but it would be interesting to hear other peoples take on the subject.
     
  8. Boneyard51
    Joined: Dec 10, 2017
    Posts: 5,360

    Boneyard51
    Member

    While we are on the subject of bad connections, guys do yourself a favor and aquire a can of this stuff! My friend turned me on to this stuff! He called it his miracle oil! He worked on Cat engines on those off shore large fishing boats in the ocean, all over the world! So he was very familiar with corrosion and poor connections! He gave me this 1/2 can and it doesn’t take much but gives excellent results!






    Bones 32511858-174F-4DE4-AC1D-24B3DF028D3C.jpeg
     
  9. MAD MIKE
    Joined: Aug 1, 2009
    Posts: 691

    MAD MIKE
    Member
    from 94577

    Yup. It helps prevent moisture intrusion and aids existing insulation.
    Even in dry climates you can still have corrosion or simply dirt intrusion into connectors. As well as making connectors much easier to disconnect. I'm sure everyone on this board had tried to pull plug wires off a set of ungreased boots. Usually the boot loses badly.
    Have an old can that is illegible now, half beaten up got it off an old operating engineer.
    'Just use a drop, it'll bust anything free.'
    It makes Kroil look like WD40.
     
    Boneyard51 likes this.
  10. rockable
    Joined: Dec 21, 2009
    Posts: 3,625

    rockable
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I had a hot start problem with my 54 Chevy with 350 sbc. Did everything I could think of, including new rebuilt starter. Still had problems. Finally, a mechanic suggested changing to the newer design mini starter motor. Problem solved. Apparently, when the old design starter gets hot, due to thermal expansion, something binds up. Newer design doesn't have that problem. YMMV.
     
    loudbang likes this.
  11. F1 Ford
    Joined: Jul 26, 2013
    Posts: 40

    F1 Ford
    Member
    from California

    Thanks for the all responses. Yeah, I've gone through the list. Remote solenoid, mini starter, heat shield, heavier battery cables, played with timing, rebuilt the carb (Edelbrock 1406). It's improved a lot -- and the carb was leaking gas into the intake. You have to remember, this car had been sitting for a while and they were running it without a fuel filter (also looped the trans lines), so I looked at lot of this as preventative maintenance. But I think what's been recommended here is going to be my go to. Best if all, it won't cost anything. Simply removing the ground to a bell housing bolt. I might add an Edelbrock heat insulator gasket later on and double check the fuel pressure (mechanical pump -- but I know those can vary in pressure). But again checking for voltage on startup should help out a lot. I'll throw it on the list of stuff to do when my friend I thrash on it -- replacing the windshield and tailgate cables -- in January.

    Thanks again for the recommendations.
     
  12. rockable
    Joined: Dec 21, 2009
    Posts: 3,625

    rockable
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Wait. Are you having trouble getting the starter to turn the engine over or having trouble refiring the engine after it sits? If the starter is turning the engine over, ground is not your problem. If you don't have a heat insulator between the carb and the manifold, you will definitely have problems refiring after it sits. Also, you will have trouble if your fuel line is too close to the exhaust manifold. Today's gas boils at a very low point and will vaporize right out of the bowl in a few minutes. Then you have to turn the engine over and over to pump the bowl back full before it will retire. You did not explain your problem clearly.
     
  13. Bert Kollar
    Joined: Jan 10, 2007
    Posts: 1,082

    Bert Kollar
    Member

    I ground the frame, engine and dashboard. If you ever had a ground fault you would understand why.
     
  14. 3 grounds is best, engine bell housing or intake manifold to firewall, Firewall to frame, Trans tail shaft to frame', wide woven ground straps are best.
     
  15. Roothawg
    Joined: Mar 14, 2001
    Posts: 22,066

    Roothawg
    Member

  16. geoford41
    Joined: Jul 26, 2011
    Posts: 621

    geoford41
    Member
    from Delaware

    I just refinished wiring my '40 ford with a Ron Francis wiring kit and they specifically tell you to run a 1 GA. negative ground wire directly from the Battery to the ground near the starter bolt and NOT run the ground to the frame " ...YOU MAY HAVE USED THE PROCEEDURE OF RUNNING THE GROUND TO THE FRAME IN THE PAST BUT WE (RF) DOES NOT MWORK AS WELL AS YOU MAY WANT IT TO"
    Ron Francis have sold tons of wiring kits so I go with their instructions... just my 2 cents
     
    Boneyard51 likes this.

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