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Hot Rods Grill powder coating and other decisions

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by nochop, Feb 25, 2024.

  1. dart4forte
    Joined: Jun 10, 2009
    Posts: 453

    dart4forte
    Member
    from Mesa, AZ

    I did a grill for my 66 Plymouth Valiant. I started by straightening the grill then we had the grill chemically stripped. After bead blasting we powder coated it Argent. Turned out real nice.
     
    nochop likes this.
  2. dart4forte
    Joined: Jun 10, 2009
    Posts: 453

    dart4forte
    Member
    from Mesa, AZ

    Paint chips, powder coat doesn’t.
     
    05snopro440 and nochop like this.
  3. nochop
    Joined: Nov 13, 2005
    Posts: 3,836

    nochop
    Member
    from norcal

    What I’m hoping for
     
  4. twenty8
    Joined: Apr 8, 2021
    Posts: 2,345

    twenty8
    Member

    Powder coat can chip, it is just less likely, especially if surface prep is good.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2024
  5. jimmy six
    Joined: Mar 21, 2006
    Posts: 14,901

    jimmy six
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I’ve never seen a powder coated grill hold up to the heat. Porcelain yes. A powder coated grille may work because I’ve seen axles powder coated.
     
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  6. dart4forte
    Joined: Jun 10, 2009
    Posts: 453

    dart4forte
    Member
    from Mesa, AZ

    I’ve done numerous grills and have never seen one chip. Now, a rock ding is another story
     
  7. twenty8
    Joined: Apr 8, 2021
    Posts: 2,345

    twenty8
    Member

    And I have run my aluminium window and door business for 27 years now, and worked in the industry for quite a few years before that, and have seen many chips in powder coat. It is vastly superior to paint, but it does chip.
     
    Last edited: Feb 29, 2024
    19Eddy30 and clem like this.
  8. 1971BB427
    Joined: Mar 6, 2010
    Posts: 8,758

    1971BB427
    Member
    from Oregon

    Powder coating is usually good for 200 degrees, although there are some specialty powders that withstand much higher temps. I really doubt most grilles will get to 200 degrees, but powder coating on engine parts is frowned on by most companies who do the work. It can get soft and then dirt sticks to the soft finish.
     
  9. nochop
    Joined: Nov 13, 2005
    Posts: 3,836

    nochop
    Member
    from norcal

    What is up front is gonna get dinged but maybe powder my not ding as easy
     
  10. I'll have to disagree... The vast majority of powder coat failures I've seen are for two reasons: inadequate/poor pre-coating prep and a too-thin coating. This is particularly true with 'production' coating where speed and cost are the driving forces. First, powder really needs a good 'tooth' on the coated surface to adhere properly. That's why blasting with media is the nearly universal pre-coating prep. A lot of the production coatings you see skip this step, assuming incorrectly that clean virgin metal doesn't need any prep. Second, a thin coat won't be as durable as a thicker coat. Merely getting coverage thereby reducing powder costs results in a coating that will be much more prone to chipping.
     
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  11. nochop
    Joined: Nov 13, 2005
    Posts: 3,836

    nochop
    Member
    from norcal

    My powder coat shop is a one man operation, that is why I’m going to do the taping and prep work. I can see how tedious and time consuming a grill is. He will probably get it done as a minimum cost as most of my jobs have been priced
     
    Budget36 likes this.
  12. twenty8
    Joined: Apr 8, 2021
    Posts: 2,345

    twenty8
    Member

    So, essentially what you are saying is that powder coat can chip........???:confused:o_O
    And, as for surface prep, I did mention that in my post a couple of days ago. Here it is again so you can read it.:rolleyes:

     
  13. pirate
    Joined: Jun 29, 2006
    Posts: 1,035

    pirate
    Member
    from Alabama

    I agree production powder coat shops don’t want to spend the time or have the trained people to do decorative work. Just a suggestion but a lot of gun shops/gunsmiths are now using Cerakote on handguns and long guns in a variety of colors for easy to maintain finishes. A Gunsmith would more than likely have the skills needed to do the quality of work needed. If properly done powder coat can be very tough and scratch resistant. Don’t have any idea about pricing. Your mileage may vary!
     
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  14. Joe H
    Joined: Feb 10, 2008
    Posts: 1,546

    Joe H
    Member

    Start looking at truck wheels, semi trucks and box trucks that use black steel wheels. Most will be rusted. Our fleet of school buses have black powder coated wheels that last about 6 to 8 years before the rust eats them up. We have had some redone by out tire dealer and they look good for about 6 months , after 6 months they are totally rusted again due to the thin coating.

    SO I totally agree with the above statements, it all about prep and thickness. Wheel rust starts at the seams, powder just can't get into tight areas like a liquid coating will. And, yes it will chip, it just takes a harder hit before it does.
     
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  15. nochop
    Joined: Nov 13, 2005
    Posts: 3,836

    nochop
    Member
    from norcal

    For you young fellas rust maybe a concern, but at my age……(I can no longer double my age) not gonna give rust a thought
     
    INVISIBLEKID and Budget36 like this.

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