Register now to get rid of these ads!

Projects Giant speedster project

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by yonahrr, Apr 25, 2010.

  1. plym49
    Joined: Aug 9, 2008
    Posts: 2,800

    plym49
    Member
    from Earth

    When the Romans designed their molding details, someone used that shape and old Flavius said, 'O, gee! That's the tits!'.
     
  2. yonahrr
    Joined: Feb 27, 2010
    Posts: 1,348

    yonahrr
    Member

    Row well and live!

    Oh wait, we already did that one. Okay how about: Drill well and screw! That's what I did today. I finished up the endcap--well mostly. There will still be the final fitting. Then I worked on installing the side trim which I got on--well mostly. There will still be the final fitting. Deja vu. This woodworking stuff goes slow. Now the other side, then the top.

    Jerry
     

    Attached Files:

  3. BuiltFerComfort
    Joined: Jan 24, 2007
    Posts: 1,620

    BuiltFerComfort
    Member

    I think you new motto fits Texas "roughnecks", the migrant oil workers, known for their hard livin' ways.

    As they say, getting there... Final fitting is a bitch, too easy to say "close enough, I'm tired, I'm done" when it really needs a little more. So hang in there.
     
  4. you will have a place for the flag pole back there ...right?
     
  5. As long as he's flyin' the "Jolly Roger" :D
     
  6. ezdusit
    Joined: May 10, 2008
    Posts: 246

    ezdusit
    Member

    Or the burgee of the Royal Cork Yacht Club -- the world's oldest yacht club...
     

    Attached Files:

  7. yonahrr
    Joined: Feb 27, 2010
    Posts: 1,348

    yonahrr
    Member

    Burghee

    I like that word. Sounds like a new kids treat at Burger King. It would look cool to have a small flag on the "stern" of the speedster. However I field enough jokes from non car people already. I'm not sure if I want to reinforce that boat image any more than I have too. ;-) So I got the side trim in place along with a little piece of molding along the inside to be glued in place by my high-dollar clothes pin clamps. But I wasn't sure how to kill molding down at the door end. I realized I needed the upholstery roll in place to figure it out. What little about upholstery I know is that when you want to make a roll you use this cardboard like stuff and staple through it. Don told me that stuff is waterproof but it looked a lot like cardboard to me so I decided to make my own stuff out of aluminum. As to the roll... I got this leather from a buddy who found a box of hides in a thrift shop. He bought three for me. One is a medium brown and quite large and thin. The other two are a dark baby poop brown and thick. To make the roll I've either got to sew up a special shape or stretch the leather. The thin light brown might stretch. The thick baby poop won't. Should I call in an expert? Yes! But there's no money so--No! Stay tuned.

    Jerry
     

    Attached Files:

  8. I have used the very old style flat antenna wire for this type of tack strip ... on hydroplanes we did in the 60's ..some we pushed tacks thru and hammered in place with the vinyl over the tacks head....
     
  9. Jack Innes
    Joined: Nov 26, 2010
    Posts: 178

    Jack Innes
    Member

    Jerry,
    I have used this formed foam edge roll on early car seats. I also have used the old style burlap roll filled with rolled paper. The foam is easier, waterproof & available from upholstery supply places.[​IMG]
     
  10. yonahrr
    Joined: Feb 27, 2010
    Posts: 1,348

    yonahrr
    Member

    Upholstery!

    Weird word. I looked up the etymology. Comes from the word Middle English word to keep from falling or sinking in. As you know I have this pattern of skipping to the next step before the last step is finished. I think this is to allow the two steps to merge better. Sounds good anyway. I've done a little upholstery here and there but not enough to start poking holes in a hide of leather. To that end I drove down to Gainesville and bought some leather like vinyl. Now I can practice and poke and staple and cut all I want. I drew up some ideas. See what you think. I got interrupted on the last one and never finished but you get the picture. Those art lessons paid off I think.

    Jerry
     

    Attached Files:

  11.  
  12. jerseyboy
    Joined: Jul 17, 2006
    Posts: 634

    jerseyboy
    Member

  13. JIMSPSYCLESHOP
    Joined: Mar 26, 2012
    Posts: 56

    JIMSPSYCLESHOP
    Member

    Jerry,
    Looks like you're design is very close to the early open Model T Fords. I'm working on this example (photo) for my Speedster Raceabout but it wont have the wrap around sides and the back cushion will lift out. I'm using fake leather to practice on also but if it looks good enough I will probably just go with it. Jimmy
     

    Attached Files:

  14. Jack Innes
    Joined: Nov 26, 2010
    Posts: 178

    Jack Innes
    Member

    Jerry,

    The second & third pictures are the seats in a 1911 Cadillac. The rear seat looks very much like your sketch no. 3. The last seat is the front seat of a 1904 Ford. Note the plain ends. These were used in many cars to give a little more room & a lot less work. The back of the Ford seat is the original 109 year old leather. The only sewing in the Cadillac seats is the piping & pattern on the front of the cushions, the Ford seats have no sewing at all. All of the diamond tuft areas are folded & held by buttons. The stuffing is curled horse hair. The weathered Cadillac seat shows what is inside. I usually use canvas rather than burlap for backing though.
     

    Attached Files:

  15. yonahrr
    Joined: Feb 27, 2010
    Posts: 1,348

    yonahrr
    Member

    Button Tuft

    Model T Seagrave. I spent the morning drawing diamonds on my seat back and evaluating them. Then I made some side for the seat with sheet metal joining sides to back. I'm thinking along the lines of a modified Model T design with a roll around the top. I've also got to think about how to fasten the roll to the deck. Also I've got to fasten the seat with the upholstery on it to the frame. It's all going to come together. Tomorrow I want to make the diamonds curve in a gentle arc. Is that possible and still have the thing look good? That's what the vinyl's for.

    Jerry
     

    Attached Files:

  16. Binger
    Joined: Apr 28, 2008
    Posts: 1,730

    Binger
    Member
    from wyoming

    I am excited to see how you finish these seats! I have been lurking watching this build for over a year and I am glad to see it finally coming together!
     
  17. Giovanni
    Joined: Jan 21, 2010
    Posts: 173

    Giovanni
    Member

    Just thinking out loud, make sure the roll on top doesn't make it awkward to operate the shifter. I really think that diamond pattern will look fantastic. Keep it up!
     
  18. yonahrr
    Joined: Feb 27, 2010
    Posts: 1,348

    yonahrr
    Member

    Whoop Yer Hide!

    Got out my hides and took some pictures. Couldn't find my camera. They looked kind of burly. Then I went to the shop and played with diamond shapes some more. After I'd had enough of that I drove to Gainesville again to find some foam and discovered a brand new Jo-Ann Fabrics. They don't know what to do when a man walks into those places. I play dumb and act like I don't know what I want--which I probably don't. They had some nice high density foam and some batting. It's pretty expensive but the nice girl told me if I buy a certain magazine there would be a half off coupon in the back. Cool! She saved me $44.00!
    Tomorrow I might actually try to tie some twine and pull it through some holes.

    Jerry
     

    Attached Files:

  19. I saw one video on YouTube where the Stitcher Supremo used a bed sheet to practice her Supremo Stitching and get the layout buttoned down.
     
  20. yonahrr
    Joined: Feb 27, 2010
    Posts: 1,348

    yonahrr
    Member

    Touched by the Divine.

    The day started out well--then went down hill--then ended in a surprise. I got to the shop early and began to drill my holes eager to tie twine on my vinyl and begin pulling it through the holes. Then I realized I needed to trim the side piece to make room for the vinyl/leather to tuck under. Then I realized I needed something to keep the side wood from falling in. Then Steve, president and mad designer from Chow Trailers and Designs came by and asked me to weld up a wine rack. Then Neil and his future in law came by and we talked about spring design. Then I realized I had no spray glue to for the foam. Then I realized I had no markers to mark the foam. Then Keith came by on a break from court where he was testifying on a court case and we went to lunch. Then I bought some spray glue and makers and some big needles. Then David from Chow came by to borrow a 17/32 grill bit. Then I cut and installed some metal to hold the side wood. Then David came back to borrow a drill big enough to handle the drill bit. Then I sprayed my glue on and stuck on the foam. Then David returned and asked me to drill some 75 degree holes in a piece of wood. Then my wife called and told me to get home because the kids were going to various Halloween parties. When I got home I was just about to unload on her about my crappy day when a traveling monk appeared and made everything right. Hey, tomorrow will be perfect.

    Jerry
     

    Attached Files:

  21. CoolHand
    Joined: Aug 31, 2007
    Posts: 1,927

    CoolHand
    Alliance Vendor

    Good grief Jerry, just reading about your life makes me tired.

    Speedster is looking good though. Getting real close.
     
  22. Traveling monks in Cleveland sure appear to be young. I bet he'd make a good Scout, band member, and speedster-build helper...
     
  23. A visit from a travelling monk is surely a good luck sign! And since he doesn't seem to care for "whine" maybe he's one the Trappist Monks that brews up some fine beer.

    http://www.chimay.com/en/en.html?IDC=27

    :rolleyes:
     
  24. jerseyboy
    Joined: Jul 17, 2006
    Posts: 634

    jerseyboy
    Member

    Not only is the build enjoyable, but the builder's narration is quite entertaining!
     
  25. plym49
    Joined: Aug 9, 2008
    Posts: 2,800

    plym49
    Member
    from Earth

    Serves you right for building a whine rack.
     
  26. yonahrr
    Joined: Feb 27, 2010
    Posts: 1,348

    yonahrr
    Member

    Halloween Update

    Friar Tuck ran into Caesar at McDonalds and they went off to a costume ball. I zoomed to Hannah's dance recital at the Halloween Bash and wound up winning first place in the men's costume contest--a pound of Guatemalan Coffee and a $10.00 gift certificate from Mount Yonah Book Exchange. Ha ha--too funny.

    Jerry
     

    Attached Files:

  27. if you measure and mark your twine (like at three inches from button )all your buttons will be set at the depth you want or pull to the desired resistance

    from the center top? push needle through hole from the back side ...pull button ( very long twine!) thru fabric, cushion ,backboard and staple down the twine at the mark... fold twin over the staple and staple both down again(do not cut yet) draw lines on the back for staples to be in rows ... think like laying wire in a junction box ... first row second row
    a staple and long string is adjustable by removing staple add or remove slack

    the curve or angle can be set like the strings on a harp
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2013
  28. Okie Pete
    Joined: Oct 29, 2008
    Posts: 3,497

    Okie Pete
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Thank you for sharing your project with us . It is great. Your skills are great . Every time I look I can hear chitty chitty chitty bang bang chitty chitty bang bang in the foggy recesses of my brain. ;)
     
  29. yonahrr
    Joined: Feb 27, 2010
    Posts: 1,348

    yonahrr
    Member

    Just want to thank everyone for hanging around and reading all my bullsh*t. It keeps me on the job. I might have bogged down by now and moved on to other projects but I can't disappoint my H.A.M.B. buds.

    Day of learning.

    I got the foam all glued on and even made up a knitting needle upholstery tool for pulling through the button strings. I discovered the drawing on the plywood doesn't always match the foam. The seat sides gave special trouble. I struggled with that until about 1:00. Then I decided to wing it when the time came because I really wanted to start seeing some diamonds! I have some buttons from a previous project so I used them but I didn't put any vinyl on them because this was all for practice. The first thing I noticed when I started pulling in the buttons was the foam didn't seem to be thick enough because the diamonds weren't as full as I wanted. The folds between the buttons gave me some problems too. I only got a few buttons in before I had to pick up kids. All in all not a bad start. I think I'm going to pull out the staples and add some batting and see if the diamonds puff up before I pull any more buttons.

    Jerry
     

    Attached Files:

  30. GOING GOOD !

    some batting will fill those puckers... up


    I have seen seats lately from turn of the century cars and furniture with brass buttons ... no cover on em....they look quite good a little tarnished

    oh yes the seat bottom should not have any buttons maybe a couple pleats


    do not be afraid to sew on fabric on edges so pulling your roll will be easier
     

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2021 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.