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Technical Getting my screws loose

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by spillaneswillys, Jul 25, 2021.

  1. I admit my wife thinks I have too many screws loose but I am having trouble with one in particular. I am trying to remove a headlight bucket from my 39 Plymouth coupe to pound out some dents and one screw will not break. I have sprayed over and over but it will not budge. I cannot get vice grips on it and not really ble to get behind it to do anything but blast it. I hesitate to use heat because I want to keep the finish that is on the fenders. Looking for some tips and thanks in advance.
     
    Stogy likes this.
  2. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 49,503

    squirrel
    Member

    pictures help....we can't tell if it's a machine screw or sheet metal screw, or what type of head it has, if there is rear access, etc.
     
    Stogy likes this.
  3. ahshoe
    Joined: Sep 12, 2012
    Posts: 838

    ahshoe
    Member

    Drill it out start small diameter bit and work larger.
     
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  4. It is a machine screw. Cant get a picture until tomorrow. Flat head screw.
     
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  5. anthony myrick
    Joined: Sep 4, 2009
    Posts: 8,320

    anthony myrick
    Member

    Micro torch can warm it up
     
  6. pirate
    Joined: Jun 29, 2006
    Posts: 663

    pirate
    Member
    from Alabama

    Have you tried putting a screwdriver in the head or using a flat punch if it’s a hex bolt and giving it a really sharp rap with a hammer? Sometimes it takes a hit or two but will loosen corrosion around screw/bolt so you can turn it loose.
     
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  7. anthony myrick
    Joined: Sep 4, 2009
    Posts: 8,320

    anthony myrick
    Member

    If I ever get my time machine working, I’m gonna punch the flathead screw inventor in the mouth.
     
  8. I have rapped the screw a few times without success. As a last resort I will drill it out but I know that can be difficult as well.
     
    Stogy likes this.
  9. HEAT is your friend !
     
    stillrunners and 1946caddy like this.
  10. cfmvw
    Joined: Aug 24, 2015
    Posts: 725

    cfmvw
    Member

    If you have a TIG welder or know someone who does, you can add enough material to the head to grab with a pair of vise grips. MIG also works, but it's messier with the spatter. I've extracted many fasteners with both methods.
     
    03GMCSonoma and mrspeedyt like this.
  11. Hollywood-East
    Joined: Mar 13, 2008
    Posts: 1,485

    Hollywood-East
    Member

    Pre load the screw, An hit it...
    Kinda like a impact screw tool, repeat as necessary... If it breaks... It's open, possibly visegrips from there..
     
    Stogy likes this.
  12. HSF
    Joined: Oct 25, 2014
    Posts: 147

    HSF
    Member
    from Lodi CA

    Pb blaster then heat then impact. Small battery powered impacts are great for these situations. Good luck.
     
    Stogy likes this.
  13. 1946caddy
    Joined: Dec 18, 2013
    Posts: 1,751

    1946caddy
    Member
    from washington

    If you're worried about ruining your fender, your using too big of a flame.
    Use a 000 tip on a oxy-acet torch or get one of those micro torches. Heat just the head of the screw until it's red hot and let it cool. Don't heat the surrounding metal. Let it cool for about 30 minutes and the screw will turn out. The expansion from heating and contraction from cooling will break the bond between the screw and whatever it's screwed into.
     
    flatford39 likes this.
  14. pirate
    Joined: Jun 29, 2006
    Posts: 663

    pirate
    Member
    from Alabama

    As Anthony said one of theses can pinpoint heat. You can get them starting about ten bucks. Handy to have around shop.
    94AC4A63-589D-450C-9F73-68A5E86877DC.jpeg
     
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  15. deathrowdave
    Joined: May 27, 2014
    Posts: 2,661

    deathrowdave
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from NKy

    What has worked best for me as explained previously , weld a nut to the head . Heating from welding will free it up and you have a hex nut instead of a slotted head screw .
     
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  16. Phillips or slotted head? Is the screwdriver slipping? Valve grinding compound on the screwdriver will help grip the screw...
     
    Stogy likes this.
  17. I have had a lot of success using an impact screw driver on stuck screws. download.jpeg
     
  18. gene-koning
    Joined: Oct 28, 2016
    Posts: 2,450

    gene-koning
    Member

    Sometimes you can break the bond by trying to tighten the screw first, just enough to get it to move, then they often come out.
    If that doesn't work, I cut the head off with a die grinder and pull everything apart. Once everything is apart, you can usually grab the remains with vice grips.

    On my 49 Dodge truck, none of the screws came out. I ended up cutting the heads off, then cutting them down flush and drilling new holes. Gene
     
  19. Lloyd's paint & glass
    Joined: Nov 16, 2019
    Posts: 5,041

    Lloyd's paint & glass
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    See post above ^^^^ impact driver
     
    loudbang likes this.
  20. ronzmtrwrx
    Joined: Sep 9, 2008
    Posts: 663

    ronzmtrwrx
    Member

    I’m with death row Dave on this, if it’s in a spot you can get to. I’ve gotten plenty of rusty stuck screws out by welding through a nut to the head of the screw.
     
  21. Stogy
    Joined: Feb 10, 2007
    Posts: 20,676

    Stogy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    If its countersink that may be a little difficult...Dome head yes...
     
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  22. Stogy
    Joined: Feb 10, 2007
    Posts: 20,676

    Stogy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    This is actually an amazing tool and comes in different sizes...One must be very careful with areas of use...

    I have visions of a caved in fender...:eek:

    One thing of note is I snooped and the headlight trim is diecast so tougher that Stainless but fragile none the less...

    s-l400 (4).jpg
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2021
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  23. Stogy
    Joined: Feb 10, 2007
    Posts: 20,676

    Stogy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    As has been suggested I would use a brand new good quality drill bit perhaps a 1/8" or #30 and carefully drill dead center to just till the outer edges are near below the head...and stop as the trick is to weaken the material where the head meets the shank...

    It does help to know what size the machine screw is as you may go up a size or two and the head many times pops right off or you can use a pin punch that fits snuggly within the hole you drilled and with a gentle side to side rock off she comes or perhaps the Headlight ring itself if tilted forward will also achieve the fracture of the drilled head...

    And yes if it's a slotted screw hold that bit tight as it will want to walk down the slot and slip into the ring...

    No need to center punch...Maybe try it on a similar screw in a vice to gain the touch required...remember keep the hole centered...

    You can grind a flat carefully onto a dome head and sometimes that helps skating as it reduces the slot...
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2021
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  24. 4ty
    Joined: Dec 11, 2018
    Posts: 203

    4ty

    50/50 mix of Acetone and ATF.

    Paul in CT
     
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  25. jaracer
    Joined: Oct 4, 2008
    Posts: 1,144

    jaracer
    Member

    After watching Matt on Iron Trap Garage, I bought one of the setups that attach to an air hammer for screw removal. Used it on my Model A windshield and it worked like a charm. However, I appear to have shot the driver bit somewhere across the shop. Luckily it uses standard screw bits. screw remover.jpg
     
  26. ekimneirbo
    Joined: Apr 29, 2017
    Posts: 2,039

    ekimneirbo
    Member
    from Brooks Ky

    If it is something that you have off the fender but can't separate it from each other, you might call some machine shops and see if they have a "disintigrator" machine. They can remove the screw without any damage to the surrounding components.
    The other way is to put a nut on top of the bolt and a quick mig weld in its center to attach it to the bolt. Obviously you have to protect the surrounding area from spatter. I'd try it with a bolt in your vise and see if you can get the mig to weld it through the hole in the nut. Once you have it adjusted right, then do the real one.

     
    reagen likes this.
  27. jimmy six
    Joined: Mar 21, 2006
    Posts: 9,682

    jimmy six
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    A crack pipe torch has worked for me and a wet rag on the fender to keep it cool. Good luck.
     
    anthony myrick likes this.
  28. I've used the smallest tip I have, to heat the head of screws and bolts. Take your time, pull the torch away every once and a while, so the flame doesn't migrate to the surrounding area(too much). Removed the countersunk screws on my 34 Ford door hinge that way. Didn't affect the paint on the hinges!
     
    Driver50x likes this.
  29. fordflambe
    Joined: Apr 9, 2007
    Posts: 554

    fordflambe
    Member

    I had #6 flathead screws stuck in my convertible window frame. I used a Dremel and cut a new slot in he damaged head. I think a combination of the heat from cutting the new slot along with a better slot to grip the screwdriver gave me just enough advantage to get it out. I did soak with PB Blaster prior to cutting the new slot.

    This is the type of bit I used.......They have a couple of different sizes........

    [​IMG]
     
  30. I finally got the screw out. After busting two bits with an impact driver and unsuccessfully trying to drill it out I just took the grinder to it. Ground the head off took the bucket out and put vise grips on the sarcophagus and unscrewed it. Thanks for all the tips it was a progression of seceral!
     

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