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Hot Rods Gasser suspensions

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by 41rodderz, Feb 4, 2018.

  1. 41rodderz
    Joined: Sep 27, 2010
    Posts: 5,158

    41rodderz
    Member
    from Oregon

    Okay need some vintage info . Were there raised spindles used on gassers with upper/lower A arms back in the fifties/sixties days of drag racing and hot rods ? I guess if they did that would fall in line with vintage gasser associations and here on the hamb ? Thanks .o_O
     
  2. ididntdoit1960
    Joined: Dec 13, 2011
    Posts: 990

    ididntdoit1960
    Member
    from Western MA

    yes - i actually had a "custom made" welded set for a tri five......as far as running somthing like that a "modern" gasser meet.....check their specific rules - I know the southeast gassers require a solid axle
     
  3. 41rodderz
    Joined: Sep 27, 2010
    Posts: 5,158

    41rodderz
    Member
    from Oregon

    Okay. Thank you. So they would be safe as a daily driver?
     
  4. AnimalAin
    Joined: Jul 20, 2002
    Posts: 3,417

    AnimalAin
    Member

    I think ball joint spacers were used more commonly than modified spindles, although I'm sure there was a little of everything in the mix. I do know that lots of mid-50s cars raced with independent front ends.
     

  5. southcross2631
    Joined: Jan 20, 2013
    Posts: 3,890

    southcross2631
    Member

    Ball joint spacers were the most common on tri fives also a lot of guys used the rubber air conditioning spacers to raise the front of their cars. Not to mention the use of the screw in spring spacers.
    Chevy van and econoline axles were cheap and easy to get.
     
  6. seb fontana
    Joined: Sep 1, 2005
    Posts: 6,508

    seb fontana
    Member
    from ct

    Check back issues of Hot Rod Delux they did a feature on a raised spindle Chevy..The guy said he been running them for something like twenty years..I can't imagine the loads put on the A arms in street driving..Scary to me..
     
  7. Then there is the good old straight axle conversion.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. 41rodderz
    Joined: Sep 27, 2010
    Posts: 5,158

    41rodderz
    Member
    from Oregon

    That green 55 is tough looking
     
  9. 41rodderz
    Joined: Sep 27, 2010
    Posts: 5,158

    41rodderz
    Member
    from Oregon

    Yes I wondered about it be the best way for an everyday driver.
     
  10. 41rodderz
    Joined: Sep 27, 2010
    Posts: 5,158

    41rodderz
    Member
    from Oregon

    Thanks for the info guys
     
  11. Any spindle mod via welding two spindles together (mentioned on post #2) and includes C style ball joint spacer (fit's between spindle and ball joint stem and a tall coil spring), ball joint spacer of another type (fit's between upper a-frame and ball joint also with a tall coil spring) have been band from running at the track due to failures.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2018
    4speed_mopars likes this.
  12. southcross2631
    Joined: Jan 20, 2013
    Posts: 3,890

    southcross2631
    Member

    I drove a 55 like that Green one in the late 60's down in Florida they were called high boys back then. It had a Chevy van front axle and the springs were on top of the rear end. Had a 340 hp 409 4speed and would not even run in the 14's. I drove it every day and it looked cool, but it was a turd.
     
    Chili Phil and Johnny Gee like this.
  13. Kerrynzl
    Joined: Jun 20, 2010
    Posts: 2,284

    Kerrynzl
    Member

    Cutting and welding 2 spindles together by a competent welder, would be just as safe as fabricated A-Arms , Tube Axles, Hairpins or Shortened Rear Ends.[or even grafted front sub frames]
    All it would require is the simple process of "Heat Treating" and "Shot Peening"
     
  14. ^^^^^ I agree.
     
  15. I don't recall the name of the company but back in the later '60s ( maybe prior to that) there was a company that made spindles that resembled an upright and the actual spindle was movable up and down to set your ride height.

    There were companies in the '60s that made dropped spindles and "lifted spindles" for gasser type of cars. At least I remember seeing them in the later '60s.

    A popular way to lift on when I was a kid was either with ball joint spacers or with rewound springs.
     
  16. There were far more cars running in the Gas Classes with A Arm Suspensions than straight axles, and that my friends is a FACT. The axle cars that ran in A and B gas in particular got most of the press, but for every axle car there were 20 A-Arm cars running in C/G, D/G and so on, and not even all the top A/G and B/G were axle cars.
     
  17. Can you explain your thinking? I don't see the load on the A-Arm changing at all. The Ball Joint, if not corrected for angle and therefore bind, yes, but not the A-Arms - what am I missing?
     
    flatheadpete likes this.
  18. High5
    Joined: Jul 2, 2012
    Posts: 185

    High5
    Member

    If the raised spindle stays within the upper and lower A-arms, then the load will be minimal because there isn't a huge amount of leverage . But if the hub to the spindle were to be located outside of say the lower A-arm (like on a 6" lift), then you will create a lever effect. And the load to the ball joints and A-arms will be increased substantially. Think of the action to a crow bar. The longer the handle is, the greater leverage you can exert. Same goes here. The taller the spindle, the more force is applied to the ball joints and A-arms. That said, I never remember hearing of a ball joint or A-arm failure.
     

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