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Technical Fuse block with ACC

Discussion in 'Traditional Customs' started by drew1987, May 15, 2020.

  1. drew1987
    Joined: Nov 22, 2015
    Posts: 621

    drew1987

    Hello everyone,

    I was shopping for a simple fuse block, perhaps with 10 fuses or so, but I want one that has provisions for accessory, that is, I would like to be able to run the radio and perhaps a few other things but not the ignition, blower motor etc.

    All of the few blocks I’ve seen are simple and straightforward, but unfortunately only have one positive pole… Maybe I am missing something with how the wiring would go, but I would assume there would be two separate “banks” One powered by the ignition switch in accessory mode, and the other powering the whole thing when the switch is in the “on” position.

    I have never wired a car to have accessory. Obviously I drive modern cars that have this, but I’ve only wired a car to use an old fashion ignition switch with only on and off. If somebody could recommend an inexpensive fuse block, with or without provisions for a flasher, that has an option for “accessory” it would be greatly appreciated.

    The whole thing would be unnecessary if I was certain it’s not a bad thing to leave my ignition “on” powering my HEI distributor
     
  2. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 46,862

    squirrel
    Member

    you could use two smaller single bus fuse blocks, eh? or get one that does not have a bus at all, and wire power to each fuse from the correct source for that circuit.
     
    firstinsteele likes this.
  3. Gahrajmahal
    Joined: Oct 14, 2008
    Posts: 409

    Gahrajmahal
    Member

    I used two fuse blocks when wiring my wife’s MGB. The Chrysler used a wiring kit and I didn’t have enough accessory fuses.
     
  4. miker98038
    Joined: Jan 24, 2011
    Posts: 486

    miker98038
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    At least on my 55 ford, the "acc" is powered in "acc" and also in "run" or ignition. Neither are powered in "start" so power to the coil is handled of the firewall mounted starter solenoid. That makes 2 panels easy. Probably something similar on your car.
     

  5. 24riverview
    Joined: Jan 13, 2008
    Posts: 854

    24riverview
    Member

    bobss396 and squirrel like this.
  6. I run dual fuse blocks, one wired to the on circuit and one wired to the acc circuit.

    Sent from my SM-A102U using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  7. fordor41
    Joined: Jul 2, 2008
    Posts: 921

    fordor41
    Member

    I used a fuse panel out of a '90's Ford Taurus in my '41. Half were hot, half were acc. Could divide up any way I wanted. I assume all modern cars are divided.
     
    bobss396 likes this.
  8. H380
    Joined: Sep 20, 2015
    Posts: 445

    H380
    Member
    from Louisiana

  9. brading
    Joined: Sep 9, 2019
    Posts: 192

    brading
    Member

  10. It’s how you set it up off your ignition switch.
    There’s split boxes, non split boxes, and separating fuse lugs.
    2 non split (like 24riverview) boxes, and one separated for ignition would give you 4 full always hot, 3 switched (accessories) and one ignition.
    Enough?
     
  11. How is the rest of the wiring in the car? It may pay to throw a harness kit into it. A Rebel 9+3 is pretty basic and inexpensive. I'm running a Kwik Wire 14-circuit in my car.

    Or:
    https://kwikwire.com/add-on-fuse-blocks/
     
  12. drew1987
    Joined: Nov 22, 2015
    Posts: 621

    drew1987

    Thank you all so much!

    I will being going with two small blocks for sure. I like that idea and leaving my flasher on the firewall as it makes it louder a little. I tend to drive this car miles with the blinker on


    The wiring in the car now is basically a copy of what came with the car. This was my first build. Didn’t even think wiring cause everything worked when the motor died and I decided street rod instead of antique. I was bothered by the condition of the wiring when I pulled it out of the front clip so I went at it with my wife’s tree loppers lol the replaced with donated modern wire. Works great if a 1950 Chevy is the goal. I want to be able to sit for a long time with the radio, and also easily add circuits for things like chargers, etc. my stock wiring’s hot points to tap into are the ammeter (which would require me shrinking my self to the size of a squirrel or taking my master cylinder and brake pedal assembly out) and the starter. I’d like a block under the dash like my vintage Lexus.


    My plan for the new wiring is to still have everything go through the Ammeter, but in a way I never need to touch again - between the alternator (nor batty - forgot) and the ignition switch.




    So this is simple with the right ignition switch. I like mine cause it’s old school but it just won’t do. What year did Chevy start with an ACC? I know my body style came with a key that when turned started the car, while early models like mine had a button (which I’ll retain) what I’d like is the earliest GM ignition that has off-ACC-run-start. The rest I can do off my own wiring diagram from when I built the car





    Many thanks everyone


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  13. BJR
    Joined: Mar 11, 2005
    Posts: 6,517

    BJR
    Member

    Putting the output of an alternator through an amp meter designed for a generator which put out 35 amps tops may cause a fire. Most alternators put out 60 to 160 amps and could fry an amp gauge designed for 35 amps.
     
  14. drew1987
    Joined: Nov 22, 2015
    Posts: 621

    drew1987

    Really?!? I’m not sure what my alt is. It’s a “basic one wire” from a local parts store run by an old school hotrod buddy. Just checked the stock wiring at it does come from the generator (I guess to measure how much “charge” the battery needs as that’s what mine appears to be measuring). I’ll have to ask my buddy what the output in that alt is. My gauge is always dead center unless my battery is worn down. It’s funny my alternator failed (freakin hot rods need maintenance too lol) and I noticed cause every time I started, the ammeter would
    Bias toward C for charge for a while)

    You’ve got me concerned. 12,000 miles has me a little reassured. I’m going to measure the output of my alt if I can.




    https://www.ebay.com/itm/264463401664 that’s a $15 assembly that does what I want. Or $200 for a 1960 Chevy NOS genuine one. Not sure I trust a $15 one to last, but, we’re talking a few wires to swap it out if it has a short life. I don’t recall any old GM in my local yard, only ford





    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  15. So here’s my favorite fuse box.
    it is split box, 10 FT and 10 switched 20 total. it uses mini blade style fuses
    Compared to 4 on the universal.
    Plus it’s waterproof and not ugly as fuck so you can put it where it’s easy to get at instead of some horrible difficult spot.

    Here’s the thing, we all need fuses. If you do need to get into the fuse panel chances are you’re not ready for any more bullshit crawling under a dash, under a seat, or into a truck. that’s my idea anyways

    C8E2A4CD-1C0A-4427-916A-EF31E426B50B.jpeg FD396898-6FF7-4186-B4ED-B0F4C95D37B1.jpeg AF68C00B-96CD-4978-9B74-D78B9549A342.jpeg
     
  16. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 46,862

    squirrel
    Member

    Or...you could add the accessory fuse panel that Chevy had in the mid 50s, it has a couple different circuits. Originally they are for Battery and Ignition, and a few extra for Dash lights. But you can connect the Ignition source to the ACC terminal on your newer ignition switch, if you want.

    This one has an AC connection and fuse, the old original ones I have from trucks are not quite so big, but might be harder to find one in good condition. I don't know the quality of these repops.

    fuse.jpg

    The big bonus point of this type, is that they use good old glass fuses, which look right in an old car. Not that modern plastic crap.
     
    302GMC likes this.
  17. JackdaRabbit
    Joined: Jul 15, 2008
    Posts: 497

    JackdaRabbit
    Member
    from WNC

    A volt gauge is thought to be safer and more meaningfull.
    Course, you hate to break up
    the complete oem dash.
     
  18. drew1987
    Joined: Nov 22, 2015
    Posts: 621

    drew1987

    I’ve got one of those, too. Man y’all have me worried about this now. I mean it’s been 5 years like that, so it must not be over loaded. Maybe when I rewire the car I’ll skip the ammeter

    So what do you
    Guys think about that $15 ignition switch? I wonder if it’s worth $185 more for a genuine Chevy one


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  19. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 46,862

    squirrel
    Member

    I would use a Chevy switch, but it wouldn't cost me $185....
     
    31Vicky with a hemi likes this.
  20. CyaNide
    Joined: Mar 2, 2006
    Posts: 202

    CyaNide
    Member
    from Texas

    Most aftermarket harnesses do only have the one power source. The fuse block is split up internally using the ignition switch to distribute power per position of the switch. I have one laid out that I am working on and using an ohm meter you can check what has full time 12v and which are keyed on only.

    CN
     
    loudbang likes this.
  21. drew1987
    Joined: Nov 22, 2015
    Posts: 621

    drew1987

    I actually really don’t mind just running two blocks. Don’t need anything fancy. But gonna check out that torus block and maybe some tiger stuff in the junk yard.

    Squirrel nice to hear from you
    Man. Yea I lean that way cause I can probly make it all work with one key


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  22. drew1987
    Joined: Nov 22, 2015
    Posts: 621

    drew1987

  23. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 46,862

    squirrel
    Member

    I would make it all work with one key, also....it's not very difficult to rekey the old GM lock cylinders. I have a bunch of spare parts, since I've been playing with them for a long time. The 60s cars had ACC, and if you look around you can probably find a later switch that will fit your dash, although you might need to find a matching nut to fit it, which can be tricky. They went to coarser threads on the switches, some time in the early 60s I think. The cylinders for the later switches are readily available, you can take them apart and move the tumblers as needed to match your original door key, but you have to make sure it's a B10 key blank, as there were several different ones used in later years, and the aftermarket stuff can be iffy.

    http://selectric.org/manuals/locks/index.html

    As for the fuse panel...how many ACC circuits do you need? one for the radio? If so, you don't even need a fuse panel for that, just one inline fuse connected to the ACC terminal on the ignition switch.
     
  24. 19Fordy
    Joined: May 17, 2003
    Posts: 6,922

    19Fordy
    Member

    I am assuming your car has been converted to 12V since you have an alternator.
    It would be a good idea to by pass your stock ammeter gauge and run a separate volt gauge
    under your dash as it's much safer.
    Amp gauges are a fire hazard. If there's a short your dash wiring will fry.
     
  25. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 46,862

    squirrel
    Member

    If the system is wired properly, and fused, then it's not a fire hazard. But the odds of it being done 100% right, are kind of slim.

    I still use ammeters in my old trucks, haven't had any issues with them. But you're not me.
     
  26. Lazer5000
    Joined: Dec 7, 2007
    Posts: 724

    Lazer5000
    Member

    The trouble with ampmeters is that it has to go right after the generator/alternator so ALL of the current has to flow through it. It will not hold the current from an alternator unless you buy a meter to match the maximum output.
    Besides that, an ampmeters only let you know how much current you are using. They do not indicate charge.
    Remember, current (amps) are the dangerous part.
     
  27. BJR
    Joined: Mar 11, 2005
    Posts: 6,517

    BJR
    Member

    You have been able to run this long without trouble, because your alternator has never had to reach it's maximum output to recharge a very discharged battery.
     
  28. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 46,862

    squirrel
    Member

    That's strange...mine indicates Discharge to the left of zero, and Charge to the right of zero. And not all the current that the alternator makes, goes through the ammeter--only the current that goes in and out of the battery goes through the ammeter. The loads such as the lights, ignition, electric fans, etc, are connected to the alternator side of the ammeter, not the battery side, so they will not show on the ammeter, and that current won't flow through the ammeter or it's wiring. But this is only true if you wire it up correctly. You could wire it up wrong, then you'd see things differently.

    And the problem isn't really with the ammeter itself. The problem is that if you have an alternator that actually charges the battery at more than 30 amps or so, the 10 gauge wire that most cars use for the main power wiring, will be getting warm...and if you did a bad job with the wiring, it could fail in other, more spectacular ways.
     
  29. drew1987
    Joined: Nov 22, 2015
    Posts: 621

    drew1987

    Mine has pegged before. Had an alt fail, so of course the battery wore down. Replaced alt and you know the rest

    I wired my car like the factory diagram that came with the 49-54 manual. Exactly the same, Actually. Used the same wire gauges as factory. Don’t have the diagram but I think it’s such that draws from things like lights show on the ammeter. Basically the thing is always in the middle. It’s bias toward charge for a moment after first starting the car, probly after first turning on the lights. But stays center assuming everything (batt, alt) are healthy. Kind of the same as temp and oil pressure as displayed on my original cluster



    The spot for my ignition switch is tiny and recessed. Wouldn’t be too hard to modify, though. Guess I’ll have to keep my eye out for switch.

    I am thinking I will throw a 30a or so Fuse between my alt and ammeter for now. I’ll consider using it in the re-wire. Maybe just bypass it



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  30. sunbeam
    Joined: Oct 22, 2010
    Posts: 4,973

    sunbeam
    Member

    I think it was a Chevy LUV that had a cool covered fuse box under the hood.
     

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