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Technical Fuel and brake line mounting bracket

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by Choppedcoupe, Dec 2, 2018.

  1. Choppedcoupe
    Joined: Oct 17, 2016
    Posts: 210

    Choppedcoupe
    Member

    Please post up your favorite methods (brackets) for mounting brake lines and fuel lines to the inside of a 32 Ford frame (or similar)?

    This is my first hot rod build, and I’m trying to learn what products are out there to help with this phase. I’ve seen some really cobbled up garbage at my local shows, and can’t tell what’s good or bad by just a google search.

    Thank you!
     
  2. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 50,275

    squirrel
    Member

    It might depend on the look you're going for...but Adel type aircraft clamps, a metal band with a rubber cushion, are quite traditional.
     
  3. TrailerTrashToo
    Joined: Jun 20, 2018
    Posts: 1,124

    TrailerTrashToo
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Long term, i.e. 10+ years, I found that the rubber dries, gets brittle and cracks in our Arizona environment.

    I have used similar clamps from Ace Hardware, that are dipped in a flexible black plastic. Long term, again 10+ years, I have seen the plastic separate from the metal part of the clamp. The difference being that the plastic still is securely in place, with a small gap at the end of the coatings.

    My OT Cummins diesel swap is getting a fuel system upgrade. I went into Ace Hardware yesterday for the plastic coated clamps. They are "Green tagged", meaning that my local store is clearing them out and will not restock them. I stocked up an assortment of clamps, cost me about $30.
     
  4. Mr T body
    Joined: Nov 2, 2005
    Posts: 2,196

    Mr T body
    Alliance Vendor
    from SoCal

    Doesn't really look street roddy when it's done. SS clamps for brake/fuel line runs. sort 364.JPG
     
    1oldtimer, mgtstumpy and catdad49 like this.

  5. I did quite a bit of digging for tasteful clamps. I have quite a collection from various sources but Ebay has lots, motorcitymusclecar inlinetube and thestopshop are where I purchased mine. Macs also has a nice little pack of clamps avail. Personally speaking the rubber lined clamps are not very appealing.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. Blue One
    Joined: Feb 6, 2010
    Posts: 11,191

    Blue One
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Alberta

    Look up made for you T clamps.
    I used them all over my chassis for brake lines and fuel lines.
    They mount into 10-32 rivnuts with the stainless 10-32 machine screws they come with.

    Lots of different configurations including these in 3/8” on one side and 3/16” on the other side.
    I used them for my fuel line and brake lines along side.
    0FE298B4-5594-4076-A12F-FE2E763B91A8.jpeg BC9720D7-42FD-42E7-ADA2-AEF5A2CE79E6.jpeg 86D39D3B-CCC5-4CC7-8D97-F03D5EA8C829.jpeg
     
    wackdaddy, vtx1800, alanp561 and 4 others like this.
  7. 41rodderz
    Joined: Sep 27, 2010
    Posts: 5,718

    41rodderz
    Member
    from Oregon

    That looks clean and tidy.:cool:
     
    Dino 64 likes this.
  8. I use black nylon p clips. Satin finish, No shiny bits, no sharp edges, good quality ones are cheap. They look like painted steel but don’t rust. They come in any size you need. I use a stainless machine screw tapped into the chassis for large ones and stainless self drilling/self tapping screws for the small ones.


    Sent from my iPad using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  9. Me being me and setting up a car then forgetting it. I've seen plastic clamps break, coated (zinc) break or rust, and rubber disappear. I use the stainless ones from Kugel (buy in bulk it's cheaper) and I use a tapping drill bit to attach them to the frame.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2018
    mgtstumpy, Bandit Billy and alanp561 like this.
  10. Blue One
    Joined: Feb 6, 2010
    Posts: 11,191

    Blue One
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Alberta

    The made for you T clamps are made from Zytel nylon and they won’t break or anything else.
    I have a buddy who has them all over his cars and they have been on his chassis for over 20 years now with no issues whatsoever.

    They’re top notch as far as I’m concerned.
     
  11. lostone
    Joined: Oct 13, 2013
    Posts: 1,866

    lostone
    Member
    from kansas

    I'm using the European style plastic clips. I like how small and unobtrusive they are.

    Would be nice to see some one design a better mousetrap for holding lines.
     
  12. Marty Strode
    Joined: Apr 28, 2011
    Posts: 6,308

    Marty Strode
    Member

    I use the stainless ones. IMG_0667.JPG IMG_0671.JPG
     
  13. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 50,275

    squirrel
    Member

    I didn't realize we were building street rods here.

    Sent from my Trimline
     
  14. Johnny Gee
    Joined: Dec 3, 2009
    Posts: 9,575

    Johnny Gee
    Member
    from Downey, Ca

    :eek: Metric?
     
  15. 2OLD2FAST
    Joined: Feb 3, 2010
    Posts: 3,632

    2OLD2FAST
    Member
    from illinois

    Next time you're in the junkyard check late 90's early 2000 dodge trucks , very nice plastic line clamps
     
  16. Choppedcoupe
    Joined: Oct 17, 2016
    Posts: 210

    Choppedcoupe
    Member

    Thanks guys, Im gonna look thru all this really heavily tomorrow night. As for traditional: on my hydraulics system, I just want “good.” I guess if I really wanted to be 100% tradish, I would have mechanical brakes and the stock model A tank. So I’m compromising here. Please forgive me, and thanks for all the replies!!!
     
  17. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 50,275

    squirrel
    Member

    Juice brakes were commonly used 50-60 years ago, as were Adel clamps. The newer clamps might work better, and no one will see them, so it's a reasonable place to compromise. But it's still a compromise.
     
  18. Blue One
    Joined: Feb 6, 2010
    Posts: 11,191

    Blue One
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Alberta

    Street rods :confused: :rolleyes:
    I see nothing wrong with neat and quality work.
    After all we aren’t building rat rods either :p
     
    Bandit Billy and seb fontana like this.
  19. If you are using 1/4 inch lines I would just contact the stores that specialize in the early Fords and buy the original type clamps used on the 1939-48 Fords.

    Charlie Stephens
     
    squirrel likes this.
  20. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 50,275

    squirrel
    Member

    50 years ago, some guys built cars with neat and quality work, with what was available. Some of that stuff is still available, and it still works, and we can still build cars well with it. I use that stuff whenever I can...but I guess I'm in a small minority of folks here? kind of sad.
     
  21. choptop40
    Joined: Dec 23, 2009
    Posts: 4,090

    choptop40
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I like the nylon ones...I used to buy the stainless rubber ones in bulk at car shows...the factory 70s gm were cool, had a tab on em..we're zinc coated I think..the new brake lines I hear are easy to bend by hand...
     
  22. Blue One
    Joined: Feb 6, 2010
    Posts: 11,191

    Blue One
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Alberta

    I used all ni-cop lines from 3/16” for brake lines and 5/16” and 3/8” for fuel and other stuff like transmission cooler lines.

    It’s supposed to be easy to bend by hand but trust me if you want tight radius nice and neat bends you really need the appropriate tubing benders.
    I found Imperial lever type benders were great.
     
  23. choptop40
    Joined: Dec 23, 2009
    Posts: 4,090

    choptop40
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Thanks for the tip..got a pic of the bender...
     
  24. AngleDrive
    Joined: Mar 9, 2006
    Posts: 1,002

    AngleDrive
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Florida

  25. Blue One
    Joined: Feb 6, 2010
    Posts: 11,191

    Blue One
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Alberta

  26. Looks like you can get a tighter bend with the Imperial one.......I'm going to check it out.
     
  27. Blue One
    Joined: Feb 6, 2010
    Posts: 11,191

    Blue One
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Alberta

    Yes, you can get a tighter radius bend with the Imperial benders.
    They’re a professional quality tool and much better than the typical hardware store benders like that blue colored one.
    And, they’re dedicated to one size of tubing for each bender so they are easier to use.
     
  28. I use the plastic dipped clamps where I know there won't be a lot of vibration and the rubber lined jobs when there's a long run between clamps. Hell, I even used the whippy stainless clamps holding the brake line on the rear crossmember. I figure when the plastic dipped and the rubber lines ones go bad I can replace them. That's what a winter maintenance program is for...
    34mufflerhangerpainted1.JPG
     
  29. Bandit Billy
    Joined: Sep 16, 2014
    Posts: 8,161

    Bandit Billy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I used SS clamps and polished every last one of them. Both brake and fuel.
    upload_2018-12-3_20-28-23.png
    frame drilled and tapped
    upload_2018-12-3_20-29-9.png
    and all SS lines
    upload_2018-12-3_20-30-59.png
    Attention to detail and pride in one's craft isn't synonymous with "street rodding".
     

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