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Technical Fresh rebuild, initial startup

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by B-ster, Dec 26, 2023.

  1. B-ster
    Joined: Feb 3, 2022
    Posts: 32

    B-ster
    Member

    I had my 317 lyb rebuilt about 9 months ago by a pro. It's been sitting since and I haven't done anything to it. It's on a stand. I've been wondering if I should have put oil in it while I'm waiting for the tranny to get finished and car painted. Should I just put cheap oil in it, rotate the engine on the stand and put it back upright?
    Also, how would I get the oil in the pump and prime it before starting?
     
  2. Oneball
    Joined: Jul 30, 2023
    Posts: 693

    Oneball
    Member

    A good builder should have oiled bores etc. so unless you’ve kept it in the damp I wouldn’t be worried.

    Before start fill the sump with the oil you will be using for break in, put some in the filter before you put it on you can then use a drill with a hex attachment ( I think on a Y block) to spin the pump and get oil pressure. Turn the crank slightly then re-prime. Do for 2 crank rotations so you prime all the valve gear and you’re ready to go.
     
    wheeldog57 likes this.
  3. drtrcrV-8
    Joined: Jan 6, 2013
    Posts: 1,709

    drtrcrV-8
    Member

    What year is your 317 LYB? They were '52-'54 & originally came with a blade/slot tang drive oil pump (the '54 may have the hex drive). You can determine if your builder used the later hex drive(requires distributer/shaft/oil pump change), or retained the "tang" drive by removing the hold down for the distributor & looking at the base of the unit, being careful NOT to rotate it, especially if your builder had it ready to fire when you picked it up. If it is still the "tang" drive I'd suggest getting a '57 or newer Y-Block "hex-shaft" distributor/shaft/oil pump, REPLACE THE NEW Y-BLOCK DRIVE GEAR WITH THE LINCOLN GEAR : THEY HAVE DIFFERENT TEETH & DO NOT INTERCHANGE!! Ask questions in the Y-Block section over on the "Ford Forum"
     
  4. B-ster
    Joined: Feb 3, 2022
    Posts: 32

    B-ster
    Member

    I did change out the oil pump and dizzy. Want options for carb.
     

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  5. B-ster
    Joined: Feb 3, 2022
    Posts: 32

    B-ster
    Member

    It is a 54 lincoln capri
     
  6. ekimneirbo
    Joined: Apr 29, 2017
    Posts: 4,281

    ekimneirbo

    First start up is critical, so you want a good "break in" oil with ZDDP additive in it for break in..........non synthetic.
    If you had a new camshaft and lifters installed, they need to be coated with a camshaft lube.....NOT just an "assembly" lube. If you are running the old camshaft and the lifters were returned to their original locations, then just getting oil flowing before starting will be sufficient. You should have started the engine for break in when you first got it. Any assembly lube that was put on the parts is most likely not there anymore.......so your best bet is to prime the engines oil until you see it flowing from the rocker arms. Don't shrug this off, and go for it, those first few minutes are the most important ones and you can destroy it quickly if you don't do it right.

    Pre-Lubing 4aHamb 001.jpg
     
    harpo1313 likes this.
  7. B-ster
    Joined: Feb 3, 2022
    Posts: 32

    B-ster
    Member

    Thanks for the info. I don't have a break in stand, that's why I didn't break it in when I got it back. I'm trying to figure out the attachment. So I basically use a oil pump to move oil from the bucket thru the engine?
    Wouldn't putting oil in the pan and rotating the engine on the stand basically get oil everywhere?
     
  8. No. You need to see oil pressure while you are properly priming.
     
    ekimneirbo and Dan Timberlake like this.
  9. ekimneirbo
    Joined: Apr 29, 2017
    Posts: 4,281

    ekimneirbo

    The idea is to force oil thru all the passages without rotating anything in the engine. Once you see all 16 pushrods with oil coming from them, then turn the engine a few degrees by hand using either the flywheel or the crank snout bolt if it has one. Prime a little more and rotate slightly again. That way you make sure you don't have any "dry" spots on the crank that didn't quite get some oil on them. You can hang the engine from a hoist to pre oil it, but you need something more substantial for actually starting it up.
     
    mad mikey likes this.
  10. B-ster
    Joined: Feb 3, 2022
    Posts: 32

    B-ster
    Member

    Is it possible to start an engine on a regular engine stand? I have an engine stand and a hoist. Is it possle to use either of these things to do an initial break-in? These are the only things I have besides dropping the engine in and starting it. It would be nice to be able to start it outside the car. It's been over a year since I got the rebuilt engine back from the shop and I'm feeling weird about it taking so long to start it plus I'm waiting for the money to get the car, including the engine bay, painted, before I drop the engine and tranny in. BTW, I am getting the hydromatic rebuilt as we speak. There's no oil in the engine, besides what the rebuilder applied while rebuilding. I'm getting antsy waiting. It'll be months before I can afford to get the car painted and don't want to ruin a perfectly good rebuild. So I guess I'm asking for advice on how to do an initial start up or a way to preserve the rebuild until I can get the engine in the car.
     
  11. Happydaze
    Joined: Aug 21, 2009
    Posts: 1,933

    Happydaze
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    The engine will be fine waiting. You'd probably cause vastly more damage through inexperience and haste than the simple passage of time can ever do. Spend the time learning, it's basic stuff. You could get the engine bay painted first, separately, then fit the engine? Might get that itch scratched?

    Chris

    Chris
     
  12. TA DAD
    Joined: Mar 2, 2014
    Posts: 1,122

    TA DAD
    Member
    from NC

    You asked about Break-in on a stand , sure why not.
     
  13. I modified my engine stand to run my motor. Oil pump needs to be primed, a cooling system installed and the starter installed.
     

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  14. Joe H
    Joined: Feb 10, 2008
    Posts: 1,550

    Joe H
    Member

    If the engine is going to set for six or 8 more months, then filling with break-in oil and turning the engine up side down to coat everything won't hurt a thing. It's all ready been mentioned about the assembly lube, 90% of it's in the oil pan by now. If your builder used camshaft GREASE, it will still be in place as long as you don't turn the crankshaft. Break-in oil is pretty slimy and will leave behind a decent coating which can help keep moisture from rusting the internals if storage is problem. Penn Grade 30w is good oil and really hard to get off your hands, I haven't had any engine issues using it.

    Only prime the oil system when getting ready to start it. That means everything is ready, battery charged, fuel in the carburetor, water in the coolant system, wires all hooked up. Priming the oil is the last step before dropping the distributor in and hitting the ignition key. You DO NOT prime days in advance, as soon as the engine rotates, you want oil pressure.
     

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