Register now to get rid of these ads!

FLOAT LEVEL- is there a general rule?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by praisethelowered, Nov 13, 2005.

  1. praisethelowered
    Joined: Aug 14, 2003
    Posts: 1,103

    praisethelowered
    Member

    It's Saturday night . . . and because I know how to party. . . I am rebuilding a holley 1904 single barrel carb.

    Anyway, all went well until I got to the float adjustment. . . I am working with a 1953 rebuild manual and it refers to an obsolete Snap-on part number for a special tool to set the float level. . . I doubt i'll come up with one of those before I need to drive to work on monday. . .


    sooooooooo. . .is there a universal rule for setting the float level? a rule of thumb? anything that will get me close?
     
  2. 97
    Joined: May 18, 2005
    Posts: 1,959

    97
    Member

    Depends on the exact application ( vehicle) , but the rule of thumb way, which will get you by is to adjust the float level so that the top of the float is parallel with the top of the float chamber/bowl when the needle just closes on the seat.
    To check this hold it up so the float is hanging and tilt the carb/bowl gently so that it just closes the needle and seat.
     
  3. If you have the float setting measurement you can do as 97 says and once the carb top is upside down measure from gasket surface to - if it was right side up - the upper body of the float.
    The little 6" machinist's rulers are great for this.

    Keep in mind that if the float is a dull black plastic (nitrocellulouse) it could have absorbed fuel and be riding lower in the fuel than it would normally.
    Which leads to flooding even if the float is set correctly.

    It the float is brass, just shake it so you can hear fuel rattling around inside.
    If so - and you probably don't have a float leak - you can get the fuel out and solder the float up so it's air tight.
    If you don't have the float measurement, let me know the car model and year the carb came from and I may have it.
     
  4. FiddyFour
    Joined: Dec 31, 2004
    Posts: 9,008

    FiddyFour
    Member

    if your floats bad as C9 suggests, let me know i have spares for the 1904's sittin on the shelf:cool:

    also, is the manual you are using the same as the old car manual project website? if i remember right, the one they have was marked as a holley from IHC trucks, not that it makes any difference what vehicle it comes off but just for refrence. lemme know if yours is different and i'll check mine to see if there is an "alternative" way to set that thing.

    PS... shoot 215slowpoke a PM... he has been diddling with his 1904's for a while now on his 3x1 setup.
     

  5. praisethelowered
    Joined: Aug 14, 2003
    Posts: 1,103

    praisethelowered
    Member

    thanks for the replies- the float isn't leaking

    upside down the float sits pretty much parallel with the top of the bowl with it's weight alone resting on the valve. . . so 97's general rule might to apply.

    I am using the IHC manual . . . which is really good for the most part but on the float adjustment just says "use the Snap-on tool checking the setting on both the "touch" and "no touch" legs of the gauge.

    If I had a measurement to go by I'd be all set. . . The motor it is from is a Ford 223 I6.

    If not I'll just set it level and see what happens . . .
     
  6. FiddyFour
    Joined: Dec 31, 2004
    Posts: 9,008

    FiddyFour
    Member

    PTL.. thats the same one i have (manual)

    i also have the 54 ford manual which has some information on the 1904 carb float setting... if your interested i can email that as a pdf or something
     
  7. praisethelowered
    Joined: Aug 14, 2003
    Posts: 1,103

    praisethelowered
    Member

    thanks . . i'd like that- pm'ing you
     
  8. 97
    Joined: May 18, 2005
    Posts: 1,959

    97
    Member


    You need to set it with the float hanging verticallly,with the pin ( hinge) end uppermost , not upside down. It is far easier to judge the closing point that way.
    Also check that the pivot pin monts and/or float arm holes are not worn oval. This allows the float to jam or hang on an angle and not close the needle and seat properly or consistently.
    The guage is just a strip of cardboard cut to an exact width, an allen key the correct size does just as well.
    The only wasy to tell for sure if the float is fuel soaked or in the case of a brass one if it has fuel inside is to weight it, if it has been resoldered it can be way too heavy .
     
  9. Paul
    Joined: Aug 29, 2002
    Posts: 15,584

    Paul
    Editor

    general rule?

    for me, if the carb was functioning before it probably only needs cleaning and fresh gaskets

    if I don't have a specific dimension to check I generaly reassemble without bending or tweeking anything.

    what year and make motor?

    '53 IH?

    I don't have a truck manual but that carb was used on other motors of course

    for instance, if you are putting it on a '53 Ford,
    my Motors Manual says 11/16
    and says measurement can be taken through the economiser hole in the carburetor body

    I would put it together as it was, run the motor and watch the level through the glass cover... or does yours have the zinc cover?
     
  10. 97
    Joined: May 18, 2005
    Posts: 1,959

    97
    Member

     
  11. 97
    Joined: May 18, 2005
    Posts: 1,959

    97
    Member

     

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2021 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.