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Technical Flathead wits end!?!?!??!

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by nevrDUN51', Jun 16, 2016.

  1. nevrDUN51'
    Joined: Feb 9, 2016
    Posts: 152

    nevrDUN51'
    Member
    from Nashua, NH

    WARNING: Long Winded Post. If you're not into reading, I don't blame you for moving on. But here's a beg for help.



    Ok, I'm here for any help I can get. I've literally been reading and searching and reading and searching for weeks. I've searched every key word, every possible misspelled key word, and gone so far as to read the factory manual a couple of times. I have two hunche. I think I'm running rich and I think I might not have enough timing. But this, I cannot confirm. Here's the details:

    1951 Ford Custom Tudor sedan.
    3 spd manual
    3.31 gears
    6 volt
    Nearly all original except gears and engine.

    Engine:
    -8BA block and heads
    -4" Mercury Crank and rods
    -bored .080" over with Egge pistons
    -New valves, guides, and hardened valve seats
    -Bubba's smallblock distributor, 20 deg, all in by 2500, set at on pin @ 550 rpm idle.
    -Brillman 55,000 coil (USA made)
    -NGK b6l @ .030"
    -Schneider 260f cam (355 lift, 111 lsa)
    -reds headers, reds downpipes, 29" glasspacks, turndowns
    -8BA carburetor with 57 jets and accelerator pump in middle setting.
    -Bob Drake water pumps
    -160 degree thermostats
    -2 row, 1" tube, aluminum, American made radiator with 13# cap.
    -water with 2 bottle water wetter
    -Flex-A-lite 17", 6 blade flex fan approx 3/4-1" from radiator.
    -550-600 rpm idle, 15-16" vacuum at idle


    The problem: my darn car seems to run ridiculously hot and misfires at higher rpm(pops through exhaust). Yes, I know that the bore makes things worse. I've literally checked and checked and checked everything. I made sure to torque the head gaskets once before I started the motor, one immediately afterwards, and then once again 150 miles later. I ran water (with water wetter) for 150 miles before switching to coolant to make sure the engine was really clean. I even filled all the gaps with cardboard(tonight), so that going down the highway, anything that comes in the grill HAS to go through the radiator. Yet nothing I do seems to make this thing run what I would consider "cool". During my highway road test tonight, in around 70 degree weather, AFTER I switched from 50/50 to straight reverse osmosis water/water wetter, it still ran with the needle just touching the middle mark on the gauge. Now correct me if I'm wrong, but with 160 degree thermostats, shouldn't it run cooler on the highway with such a robust cooling system? ALSO, the temp gauge still creeps up during idling in traffic. Now, I didn't take the car for a 2 hour tour tonight after doing the fan, coolant, cardboard baffling, and coil, but I drove 10 miles on the highway and 10 miles in downtown traffic, and feel the behaviors are definitely indicitive of trouble when it's 95 out. I just want opinions and idea and suggestions. I most definitely plan to get a real temp gauge soon. I will say this, the hottest my temp gauge has ever got while driving was about halfway between middle and 3/4. It has never boiled over or puked out the overflow. It had died once, when I took it out in 90 degree weather, but as far as I could find, that was the coil. I've done the radiator, thermostats, fan, and cardboard air shrouding all to try and get this thing to run icy cold so I can drive the hell out of it.....and I worrying about nothing?



    Next, the misfire. My stock distributor advance would not function properly and my car ran hot as hell. So I ordered me up a Bubbas distributor. I told him my exact setup, and he built me what he thought I needed. After installing and timing the distributor, I have a mid/high rpm misfire. Honestly, I thought this was my coil. Hence why I have the Brillman. I've done like 5 plug chops and they always look good, but I haven't pulled over immediately after a misfire (coasting to a stop with engine off). Going from a 52 to a 55 jet seemed to help the misfire a bit, but the 57 jet didn't help and seems to make the engine run hotter. Basically, the car drives wonderful as long as you don't get too much past 1/3-1/2 throttle above around 2000 rpm. It basically progressively breaks up and if you keep your foot in it, it will actually start to pop out the exhaust. Let back out of it and it drives completely normal. Cruises smooth, etc.



    Here's my two guesses, but I really want all opinions, good and bad.


    Idea 1: timing the car @ 550-600 rpm is already in the advance and I'm actually not getting enough advance when I need it?(maybe I have a total pos timing light?)


    Idea 2: a combination of my main jets being too big and my power valve being a little off due to my cam, I'm dumping too much fuel and basically loading it up when I start getting into the throttle, ALSO causing significant higher exhaust gas temperature, leading to my overheating?


    I'm really sorry for the long winded post, but I just have dreamed of owning one of these cars forever and after a 10 year career of being a mechanic/technician and dropping a TON on this built motor, I'm stumped by hot water and a misfire!!?!?!? If any of my former bosses know about this they'd kill me.

    Help please? (Also feel completely free to tell me I'm an idiot if you have a constructive suggestion to follow)


    Update 6-19/2016

    UPDATE:

    So, Friday afternoon, I spent 3 hours working on the flattie. I followed advice on here and here is the results, including that I couldn't get it running well enough for my trip:


    First: I rejetted the carb with 51 jets and set the idle @ 600 rpm. I adjusted the idle screws per factory manual with a vacuum gauge to approximately 1 1/4 turns out each. This made the misfire much worse. (While carb was apart, I verified float height to factory spec)

    Second: I advanced the timing 2 & 4 degrees and each time the car ran significantly worse. @ 4 degrees, the misfire was notably worse, almost undrivable. I will say this, the idle gets seriously worse as you mess with the timing. It really idles by far the best, with #1 blinking on the pin/timing mark at idle, just like bubba told me on the phone.

    I will say this much, it really seems that the problem is coming on as the distributor starts to advance. A theory I'm having is this, and I apologize for not mentioning this little tidbit, but I didn't want to start anything about GMC Bubba, as he has already offered to replace my distributor. When I installed the distributor, I noticed that it wiggled when the car was running. More of an oscillation, suggesting to me that the shaft/gear combination wasn't true. I mentioned this to bubba and after checking everything he wanted me to check, he offered to replace it. I also removed the rotor and found the advance springs to look as if one old used spring and one new spring were used. I don't know if this is normal, but it doesn't seem right. SO, what I am thinking is that with all the physical movement of the distributor combined with what seems to be floppy/undercontrolled flyweights, maybe my mechanical advance is hopping all over the place and causing an occasionally/randomly retarded spark which then causes my exhaust popping while its misfiring. I just got home and have to take care of some things around the house, but I plan to throw the factory distributor back in and see if the misfire goes away. Even with no advance whatsoever, the motor shouldn't misfire, just run hot. I will update as soon as I try that.

    thanks for all the help guys, I really do appreciate it. If the distributor doesn't change the problem, I will probably be checking compression and potentially pulling the Intake. Let's keep our fingers crossed. And for what it's worth, I have the vv like crimped 3 times, but I will cap it off with a plug to make sure it's not leaking.

    UPDATE: 6-28/2016

    Update:

    Last night I replaced:

    ~ the spark plugs with new NGK B6-L gapped @ .035
    ~the cap and rotor (due to cap rotor contact during distributor installation and timing)
    ~Added a ground from pass cyl head to distributor housing.
    ~moved coil from pass cyl head to pass fender
    ~tightened (AGAIN) intake bolts. This feels like the 4th or 5th time I've done this.
    ~performed a compression test; all cylinders had between 115-120 psi of compression after the same amount of cranking time.

    Tonight I will be making up/fitting a set of plug wires from Brillman with Packard 440 wire.

    will update tonight.


    UPDATE 6-29/2016:

    Last night I finished up my ignition revamp with a nice set of Packard 440 wires custom made by me/Brillman. Took the car for a ride and OH WHAT A DIFFERENCE. I'll start by saying this; the car does still have a miss, but it's a mild lean miss that is most likely an intake leak from the crappy gasket. Now, the car idles amazingly and revs cleanly with only a few little small-small/med throttle opening misses and cleans right up with a little more throttle. @ wide open, it pulls clean, smooth and hard to redline. Now that I have the car running almost perfect, tonight I will be spraying her down to find the exact leak and repair it. To recap, here is what I found to be the sources of the problem, and here's a BIG admission of guilt.

    When I went to check compression 2 nights ago, my buddy went to pull the plugs out for me on the drivers side and said "hey, these are loose?!?" To what I replied "WHATS LOOSE?????". Well he was talking about the little terminals on top of the spark plugs. They were all loose. So i thought back and realized that when I swapped out the distributor, I replaced the spark plugs. Somehow I didn't notice the terminal caps being loose. Lesson learned that even after 10+ years working professionally on everything from Scandinavian cars to Italian cars to spending several years at a Ford dealer, you can still overlook the MOST BASIC of problems.

    As far as intake/air leaks, I kind of knew better when I chose to install the cardboard/paper gasket that my builder sent with the engine, rather than use the Offy gasket I bought from speedway, along with reusing some gaskets on the "freshly rebuilt" carb. I seriously considered the potential leaks and headaches that these choices could cause, but like everyone that has ever been in a rush or been anxious to get a project done, I said "screw it".

    Let's hope that tonight I find a few intake leaks with the carb clean and repair them quickly with some gaskets that I have. Then I can chalk this all up to engine swap growing pains and great help from the forum.


    Will hopefully be posting my last update/closure post by tomorrow evening.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2016
  2. blowby
    Joined: Dec 27, 2012
    Posts: 7,402

    blowby
    Member
    from Nicasio Ca

    Get a handheld infrared thermometer so you can point it at the heads and see if both sides are the same, and what the actual head temp is.

    Is the misfire related to rpm or throttle opening? Can you wind it up past 2k with slow throttle opening?
     
    volvobrynk likes this.
  3. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 48,340

    squirrel
    Member

    Have you tried advancing the timing a little and see what happens?

    Have you checked what the engine temperature is with an IR temp gun?

    Extra fuel does not make them run hotter...it usually doesn't make them break up. Running out of fuel will do that, as will an ignition problem
     
  4. Bader2
    Joined: May 19, 2014
    Posts: 1,143

    Bader2

    160 thermostats wont make it run cooler either,theyll just open sooner,and wide open,is wide open. And what does it run for temps? Just cause it has 160 stats it aint gonna run 160.
     
    belair and firstinsteele like this.

  5. First, the jets are too large. #50 - #52 is normal for these carburetors. Also you might check the power valve for leaking while you are at it. They often fail if there is a backfire.
    I am assuming that the Bubba's distributor runs off maniflold vaccum and not that vaccum source on the back of the 8ba carburetor. That should have been plugged.
    Last, the breaking up at higher rpm is an experience I have had when the point gap was too large. I'm sure Bubba did a great job but it doesn't take much to check the dwell with a meter.
    Check your temperature with a real mechanical temp gauge rather than trusting the electric dash gauge. Idling a flathead in hot temps is always a problem with these engines because the exhaust ports run through the water jackets and make them difficult to cool especially at idle.
     
  6. Truck64
    Joined: Oct 18, 2015
    Posts: 4,524

    Truck64
    Member
    from Ioway

    Don't know much about flatheads but generally low manifold vacuum (15" or 16") coupled with high temps sounds a lot like retarded ignition timing. Usually 18" or 19" of vacuum is about right for a stock cammed healthy V8 at Sea level.
     
  7. Ralphies54
    Joined: Dec 18, 2009
    Posts: 749

    Ralphies54
    Member

    Many years ago I drove to florida with my 48 coupe /3/4 race FHead and 160 stats .Left in May nice Eastcoast weather further south the hotter the eng got, ended up some where in Georgia Removing both stats, eng cooled down and stayed that way for the 2 years I was there. Try taking them out!!!
     
    stoneyzoni likes this.
  8. Petejoe
    Joined: Nov 27, 2002
    Posts: 10,850

    Petejoe
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Zoar, Ohio

    A lot of good points listed here. First flathead, money spent, sweat and blood lost. Easy to get impatient. Step back. Rethink. We are all still in the learning curve.
    Jets sound too large to me also.
    Try changing your condensor again. Yes again.
    You never have enough condensers on hand.
    If all else fails. Try running one carb until you get it sorted out.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2016
  9. Mike51Merc
    Joined: Dec 5, 2008
    Posts: 3,856

    Mike51Merc
    Member

    You said: "I will say this, the hottest my temp gauge has ever got while driving was about halfway between middle and 3/4. It has never boiled over or puked out the overflow."

    Not to be rude, but you say you're driving in 90-95 degree temps, that's the highest the gauge has gone, and then you call that ridiculously hot? Get yourself a mechanical temp gauge (or two!) and then tell us the results. How hot is hot? What's ridiculous and what's normal? If your not boiling over, well frankly you're not TOO hot.

    My flathead (which I now finally consider a great running engine) changes it temperament significantly when the outside temps rise over 90. I'm running a stock cooling system and barely make it to 180 on most days, but on hotter days (over 90) I easily hit 205-210, especially on the highway on inclines. Despite your cooling system upgrades, you cannot change the laws of thermodynamics. Hotter outside = Hotter inside.

    As for your breaking up/backfiring I agree with the others that your 57 jets are too big. Take it for a WOT run, replicate the problem, and immediately kill the engine and coast to a stop. Pull a couple of plugs and read them. If they're black you're too rich. The saying goes "popping under throttle is rich, popping under deceleration is lean". Jet it down to stock 51 for a baseline and work from there. Get a new powervalve just to test.

    Ignitionwise, just for the fun of it I'd toss the points and swap in a Pertronix just to eliminate dwell and condenser from the diagnosis chart.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2016
    whodatsCJ7 likes this.
  10. nevrDUN51'
    Joined: Feb 9, 2016
    Posts: 152

    nevrDUN51'
    Member
    from Nashua, NH

    Thanks a lot guys for the input. I'm taking the car for a several hundred mile trip this weeken and will be addressing most of your suggestions including adding a temp sensor in each head. I will most likely run the factory gauge in one head and the aftermarket in the other once all is said and done, mostly because I want my whole factory cluster to work. But I will put a temp gauge on each head next week and drive it around. I'm honestly starting to think that it's not getting hot. I hit the heads with a temp gun and they stay under 210 when idling. I'm just nervous. As far as the misfire, I'm going to keep looking and follow some of your suggestions.
     
  11. King ford
    Joined: Mar 18, 2013
    Posts: 1,464

    King ford
    Member
    from 08302

    Here is what I recently discovered, ( I have a thread started on it in fact) ...if you have an engine in which the flame takes a long time to spread across the combustion chamber , and I think a flathead qualifies as this) if you light it too late ( late timing) the fire is still burning when you open the exhaust valve we think, advancing the timing has knocked significant temperature out of the smallblock Chevy engine I am currently working on ....did Bubba give you a total advance number , not just initial? If you have a total number but your front crank pulley is not marked, you could measure the circumference of your pulley, decide by 360 and get a measurement of how far clockwise to put your total advance Mark
     
  12. 55willys
    Joined: Dec 7, 2012
    Posts: 1,615

    55willys
    Member

    Get a modern timing light that you can dial in the advance on, that way you can see what full advance is. Condensers can do weird things when they don't work right, and usually at higher rpm. I have had many bad ones brand new out of the box. The dual temp sensors in the heads are not the same. The one with two terminals is a switch with a bimetal spring, when it gets hot the contacts open causing the gauge to go full hot in the at rest position. The single temp sensor actually does the reading of temp and adjusts the contact to ground much the same way as a mechanical voltage regulator does by the frequency of the open and closing of the contacts.
     
  13. Thaplumbr
    Joined: May 7, 2012
    Posts: 119

    Thaplumbr
    Member

    Any particular reason your running a 13# radiator cap? Best I'm remembering the stock cap was 6 or 7 #, also on the misfire I had the same thing and it turned out to be one of my valves had closed the gap on one of my plugs, regapped the plug and put a plug shim in and cured it...... Just my .02, good luck!
     
  14. Bruce Lancaster
    Joined: Oct 9, 2001
    Posts: 21,682

    Bruce Lancaster
    Member Emeritus

    As I read it...you have the stock gauge, and your reference point is just the middle mark? I think this means that you do not know what the temperature actually is, and I don't see much in "It has never boiled over or puked out the overflow" to indicate that it is very hot. Get a gauge with numbers, once you know what the lines on factory gauge really mean you can toss the aftermarket one.
    Start by fixing your jets...those are crazy rich, and if car won't run right with stock jets that is a symptom that needs to be figgered out.
    THEN look over the problem, if there is one...try easy stuff like setting the timing up 2 degrees, then back 2, just to see what happens.
    Do a test drive with no aircleaner, too. Vintage air cleaners and modern hotrod air cleaners are frequent sources of trouble!
    .080 Bore you have is NOT a problem. Your walls are still WAY thicker than any newer Ford engine, and engine at .080 has numerous rebuilds still in it.
     
    volvobrynk likes this.
  15. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 48,340

    squirrel
    Member

    I pick a cap pressure based on the radiator...if it's an old fashioned one with big tanks, I use a low pressure cap, if it's a modern design that can hold more pressure, I use a higher pressure cap. Putting a 16 pound cap on a radiator that can only hold 7 psi gets ugly when the tanks bulge out...
     
  16. nevrDUN51'
    Joined: Feb 9, 2016
    Posts: 152

    nevrDUN51'
    Member
    from Nashua, NH

    Read my first post. It says why I used a 13# cap: A modern aluminum radiator with modern Bob Drake water pumps.

    Also, it states that I have a misfire that pops through the exhaust. That means it has nothing to do with comparing the way the car drives to my grand marquis or your Camry. I was a certified Ford tech before I joined the union, so I know more or less what I'm talking about. This is a misfire, meaning that the bang is not banging at the proper time the bang is supposed to happen (or not happening at all), causing the engine to deliver power in a less than smooth fashion, and if you continue to try and ride it out, it eventually starts to pop through the exhaust.


    Head gaskets: I have absolutely NO bubbling through the cooling system from exhaust gas, I have no unusual contaminants in the cooling system indicating a compromised seal anywhere.


    Also, as far as jetting, the motor is FAR FROM STOCK. Therefore it's not unusual that the stock jets wouldn't work. Did any of you read the post? I get it, it was long, but seriously, needing a jet size or two bigger after increasing the displacement 27 ci, raising the compression almost a whole point, and adding a performance cam with a true dual exhaust. The factory 110hp mercury ran 57 jets from the factory, which is why I tried them. I don't disagree that my mixture is rich, just don't agree that stock carb always means stock jets.



    Also, I have checked and tightened all exhaust manifold bolts. I didn't Jury Rig the exhaust, I just opened up one of the terribly pinched tubes and added a few reinforcing welds. It's tight and alright as far as function goes, just not the way I want it.
     
  17. nevrDUN51'
    Joined: Feb 9, 2016
    Posts: 152

    nevrDUN51'
    Member
    from Nashua, NH

    But I 100% agree now that I'm worrying about a temperature/overheating problem that isn't there. I will verify Sunday when I throw a temp gauge in.

    But this misfire has me
    Stumped.
     
  18. I'll throw my hat in here. I know we got off to a bumpy start so you may not even read this, that's ok to.
    I've had a very close experience to what you explaining in the past. It was a customers car and had been to many others with mixed changes but still not right. It wanted to run hotter that he liked at highway and fell on it's face at upper speeds and R.P.M's. Giving all the others before me due credit I just went a different route. To me his issues sounded like Lean burn issues. He had put a new pump on as well as an off a good running motor used pump. I started looking behind that. I found 4 different spots in the fuel hard line that were flattened a good amount but not crushed from who knows what. The joint for the line in the tank was crusted up and restricting also. I removed the tank and rodded out the feed line then built a new chassis line with a new flex line at the pump. Now fuel delivery was free flowing and it was the end of both his issues. I suspect you've already looked for this but haven't heard it mentioned so thought I'd pitch it out there.
    The Wizzard
     
  19. 19Fordy
    Joined: May 17, 2003
    Posts: 7,126

    19Fordy
    Member

    Will too tight valve adjustment cause your engine to run hot?
     
  20. Bruce Lancaster
    Joined: Oct 9, 2001
    Posts: 21,682

    Bruce Lancaster
    Member Emeritus

    The merc with 57 used an ENTIRELY different carb than the Ford. None of your mods would suggest a need for major jetting changes, as your venturis simply respond to the airflow through them. Major jetting changes are rarely needed because of how the system works. The unburnt part of the gas might well cook off downstream...
     
  21. Petejoe
    Joined: Nov 27, 2002
    Posts: 10,850

    Petejoe
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Zoar, Ohio

    Yes we have read your post. Very thorough. Wish others would do the same.
    But don't dismiss the fact you are communicating with those who have worked with these engines in various stages of horsepower for decades.
    They are giving you information based on experience. This information may not be the answer to your problem but it definitely is meant to give you a basis to find your problem.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2016
    Baumi likes this.
  22. nevrDUN51'
    Joined: Feb 9, 2016
    Posts: 152

    nevrDUN51'
    Member
    from Nashua, NH

    I'm going to throw some 52 jets I have kicking around in it when I get home, before my trip northward. I will also double check the base timing on the motor. As far as checking the fuel lines and other suggestions, they will have to wait until I return from my trip.

    Thank you so much for your suggestions folks, I appreciate them all.
     
  23. Bader2
    Joined: May 19, 2014
    Posts: 1,143

    Bader2

    I time them by ear,just below pinging,regardless of what the timing light says. Its where they run best that matters.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2016
  24. I once bought a big block Coronet cheap because it had a miss and the guy changed tires and it still had a miss. :rolleyes:
     
  25. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 48,340

    squirrel
    Member

    I mentioned running out of gas as possibly causing the problem...thanks for clarifying what I meant. Fuel starvation will cause problems at higher rpm under load, like he's experiencing.
     
    whodatsCJ7 and 29AVEE8 like this.
  26. Mike51Merc
    Joined: Dec 5, 2008
    Posts: 3,856

    Mike51Merc
    Member

    Lots of people think that an increase in displacement requires an increase in jet size. Even more people think that you can put a huge carburetor on a small engine if you put smaller jets in and vice-versa. Simply put, it just doesn't work that way....
     
    Baumi likes this.
  27. 29AVEE8
    Joined: Jun 28, 2008
    Posts: 1,384

    29AVEE8
    Member

    OK I'll give my $.02. If I understand correctly according to your description, you developed the mid/high misfire after installing Bubbas dist and that it is a full centrifugal advance dist.. Is that correct? I am assuming that you are using the original Holley 94 with the port on the passenger side of the carb where the Loadamatic vacuum connected. If you did not seal that port then it may be leaking vacuum to the mixture. That port has access to both manifold vacuum and venturi vacuum. Here is my thinking. If it leaks at idle you may be masking that manifold vacuum leak with the idle mixture adjustment screws. As the car accelerates the accelerator pump then the power valve may mask it. Once the engine is running on the main jets the rich idle adjustment can no longer mask it and you will have a lean condition. The venturi vacuum port is quite small but a vacuum leak is a vacuum leak. I would make sure that port is sealed. To check I would set the idle slightly lean and introduce some carb cleaner at that port. If idle speed increases you may have found part of your problem. Next I would inspect the fuel lines back to the tank to look for restrictions and proximity to heat sources, then asses the fuel pump for proper volume and pressure.
     
  28. dirty old man
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 8,888

    dirty old man
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Another item that hasn't been touched upon is valve springs. You have a non stock cam, reground most likely, and that usually means adjustable tappets. It's been over 50 years since I've been inside a flathead, but in the back of my mind I sorta remember that those adjustable tappets are hard to find nowadays, and when you do, they are often solid, not hollow like the older, much lighter ones. This means you gotta have stiffer springs, and btw, if they're the old Zephyr type springs with close coils at one end, the close coils should be at the valve guide end for less weight going up and down.
    Get a good quality mech. gauge on there, which Btw takes a special fitting from Stewart- Warner. You can put it below dash in a temp mount to just verify and if satisfied temps are OK, then you can reinstall stock gauge if you like.
    Now just a friendly word from an old man who's been there, and done that, failed, fucked up, and tried again till I found and fixed many a problem, and somehow survived to be 78 1/2 years old and still struggling to get on and off a creeper: You have on this thread, some of the sharpest guys on HAMB, especially Bruce Lancaster, Squirrel, and many others, trying to help you, and getting all huffy and asking folks if they even read your post isn't going to help you get help.
     
    norms30a likes this.
  29. last fomoco I had a stupid miss in was because of one of the new(bad) plug wires I had put on...like the others have said - a thermometer gauge you can shoot on the motor will confirm the temp of the engine and is a good tool to check a temp gauge accuracy....
     
  30. steinauge
    Joined: Feb 28, 2014
    Posts: 1,507

    steinauge
    Member
    from 1960

    Do you by any chance have access to a known good carb you could try? Trying the other distributor is certainly a good idea.In situations like you describe I usually advance the timing until the engine starts kicking back at the starter and then retard it until it starts.It can then be fiddled a little at a time until you get it where it needs to be.Good luck with your problem.
     
    stillrunners likes this.

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