Register now to get rid of these ads!

Flathead Ford carb guys...what is this??

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Chris, Dec 1, 2009.

  1. I bought a 1946-1948 Ford flathead V8 from a guy last weekend. He says it was in a 1/2 ton pickup. Didn't notice until today that the carb had a funny brass thingy hangin off the side, with a small copper tube that goes into the top of the bowl. Spacer plate under carb is for vacume...like a Columbia rear end and I don't know if that has anything to do with it or not. It's just a regular Holley 94 model 59...anyone know what that brass thing is???

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. outagas
    Joined: Sep 28, 2008
    Posts: 19

    outagas
    Member

    Good Eye, 440 Roadrunner. That's what it is ! I got two of those Southwind heaters in my Garage.

    outagas
     
  3. Crestliner
    Joined: Dec 31, 2002
    Posts: 3,013

    Crestliner
    Member

    How well do they heat your garage? (ha)
     
  4. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 17,247

    alchemy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    It's the "generic" fuel siphon for a Southwind heater. Some carbs had a specific siphon produced that would bolt on without modification, but that one fits all and siphons from an extra hole drilled in the top of the carb above the float bowl. I've got a siphon that bolts to a 97 and siphons off the jet plug screw area.

    Ever see a Stromberg (or Chandler-Groves) with an extra hole drilled in the top? We all have, right? Well, the owner of that car bought the generic Southwind instead of the Stromberg-specific model.
     

  5. 36tbird
    Joined: Feb 1, 2005
    Posts: 1,084

    36tbird
    Member

    Yo Alchemy,
    If I have a Stromberg with a hole above the float, that is a siphon hole? I just assumed all came that way and that it was a vent hole which would explain why all of us with Stromberg equipped flatheads always smelled fuel in the garage around the cars. Should those holes be covered?
     
  6. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 17,247

    alchemy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I think most carb rebuilders recommend filling the hole with a small lead BB, hammered flat in the hole. Then you can file it a bit and it will hardly show.

    Strombergs vent just fine without any auxiliary holes.
     
  7. Bruce Lancaster
    Joined: Oct 9, 2001
    Posts: 21,682

    Bruce Lancaster
    Member Emeritus

    You also have a plate adding an extra vac hookup below the carb...this is the air pull that works an actual venturi in the South Wind...it meters its fuel via a self contained carburetor!
    I'd bet that in the northern parts of the USA, 10--20% of Strombergs have the little holes. Very few Ford carbs seem to...presumably the hotwater heaters were solidly taking over by the late '30's.
     
  8. WOW! Learn something everyday. Thanks guys!! And yes, I have seen Strombergs with the little hole on top...I now know what thats for :D

    Thanks y'all!!!
     
  9. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 17,247

    alchemy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    In Iowa it's more like 50/50.
     
  10. Bruce Lancaster
    Joined: Oct 9, 2001
    Posts: 21,682

    Bruce Lancaster
    Member Emeritus

    Whoa. Anytime the number of punctured Strombergs you see passes 20% of the herd, it's time to load up the deuce and move south!
     
  11. dirty old man
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 8,912

    dirty old man
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I've got one of the vacuum adaptor plates, was on a 3 deuce setup that came with a partly completed car I bought. I removed the plate while shining up the manifold and carbs before selling the setup.
    I remember that these heaters were supposed to work real well when they were right. Never had one myself.
    Closest to them I personally came was a '56 or '57 Chrysler stopped on the side of the road late one night, black smoke streaming from the car, and all the middle aged and elderly lady occupants out on the side of the road. I stopped and managed to figure out that the car had a gas heater and it was malfunctioning.
    When I turned it off the smoke stopped and the ladies were able to resume their trip home to points in South GA after their trip to Atlanta. Cold, true enough but at least able to ride.
    Would like to know more about those old heaters, how much gas they used, and whether one could be used today in a roadster I'm building. My last roadster was sans heater, but I was 18 and now I'm 72! These old bones get cold, and I always heard those heaters got hot fast!
    Dave
     
  12. rotorwrench
    Joined: Apr 21, 2006
    Posts: 633

    rotorwrench
    Member

    I've worked with combustion heaters in aircraft over the years and I've always felt they are a little on the dangerous side. Ricky Nelson's death in that old DC-3 comes to mind. If the outer combustion can cracks you will have a carbon monoxide leak into the passenger compartment. On an old roadster it probably wouldn't affect you but in a better sealed car it could be deadly. They have to be inspected yearly before you use them or your asking for trouble.
     
  13. greasemunkey
    Joined: Jul 24, 2007
    Posts: 201

    greasemunkey
    Member
    from katy, TX

    ...it's a bit dirty.
     
  14. Shaggy
    Joined: Mar 6, 2003
    Posts: 5,207

    Shaggy
    Member
    from Sultan, WA

    That is one of 3 or 4 different hookups i've seen for them
     

  15. Yeah, it's old.
     
  16. 36tbird
    Joined: Feb 1, 2005
    Posts: 1,084

    36tbird
    Member

    On my 8BA, I'm using a vacuum adapter plate as the connection for the PCV under the center 48. Seems to be working well.
     

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2021 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.