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Technical Flathead Ford 8ba rebuild

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by devotion, Jan 30, 2012.

  1. swimeasy
    Joined: Oct 17, 2006
    Posts: 1,067

    swimeasy
    Member

    Hang in there-flatty fever has set in!
     
  2. Dino
    Joined: Oct 22, 2002
    Posts: 225

    Dino
    Member

    Flat fever must be catching...I just got mine put together (mostly) at six PM today. It has a Mercury crank, bored .060" over, 1.6" valves, and everything was balanced. I can't wait to hear it run.
     

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  3. clarthepio
    Joined: Sep 24, 2011
    Posts: 50

    clarthepio
    Member

    This is just the thread i needed!! I too will be rebuilding my first ever 8BA. If there is anyone in Australia that knows where i can get my flatty magnafluxed let me know.

    Subscribed!!!
     
  4. clarthepio
    Joined: Sep 24, 2011
    Posts: 50

    clarthepio
    Member

  5. R Pope
    Joined: Jan 23, 2006
    Posts: 3,309

    R Pope
    Member

    Guys..a good trick of the old timers was to roll and drop a flathead block on a wood floor to dislodge all the crud that builds up in the water passages over a half century or so. You can get real physical with no harm. Keep at it until the rust stops shaking loose. Remove all the studs on a 59a type block first! You'll be amazed at what shakes out.
     
  6. olcurmdgeon
    Joined: Dec 15, 2007
    Posts: 2,104

    olcurmdgeon
    Member

    Or you can use a piece of welding wire as a pick and work down in the water jackets at the rear of the block, tipping the block on its nose occasionally to dump out what you have dislodged. You should do this before you have the block tanked.
     
  7. Tom S. in Tn.
    Joined: Jan 16, 2011
    Posts: 1,108

    Tom S. in Tn.
    Member

    I can vividly remember working days on end stitching cracks up in these things with a drill, a tap, and brass screws when I worked in a machine shop back in the 70's. Like a 216/235 Chev, I've never seen one without cracks in the exhaust valve seats. I've seen sleeve after sleeve bored out to put others in, studs drilled out and helicoiled, valve seats, etc., all in an effort to save one of these antiques.
    Freeze cracked water jackets- bummer for certain. Might consider 'Liquid Glass' in something as old as this even if you don't have a lot of cracks present at rebuild.
    Tom S. in Tn.
     
  8. Tom S. in Tn.
    Joined: Jan 16, 2011
    Posts: 1,108

    Tom S. in Tn.
    Member

    These are not modern day thin-wall castings. That's still usable. Tom S.
     
  9. devotion
    Joined: Apr 15, 2009
    Posts: 193

    devotion
    Member
    from idaho

    Well, either way I'm in this block the same money as the second one ( that I am getting my money back for) so its all good. I also have decided in the long run this will be better so that if a rebuild is needed down the road there is plenty of meat left on I for another bore for myself or someone else. This guy has been building motors since the 60s, including the one he has sitting in his 38 ford at the shop...his high school car. I've decided to go 60 over and a larger crank. Any draw back to going to a 4 1/4 inch crank with stock rods?
     
  10. Can't answer your questions, but this is an interesting read so far. I've got a complete 8BA sitting in my garage waiting for a rebuild, so I appreciate you taking the time to post all this info. I'm actually doubtful that mine is a good block, but I'm going to tear it down for the experience.
     
  11. swimeasy
    Joined: Oct 17, 2006
    Posts: 1,067

    swimeasy
    Member

    COOL! Always great to hear that another motor has come back to life!
     
  12. Kenneth S
    Joined: Dec 15, 2007
    Posts: 1,527

    Kenneth S
    Member

    Any updates? I got a 49 flathead also, I've rebuilt lots of other engines but never a flatty, just started taken it apart, and have to get all 8 stuck pistons out. Oh what fun this is going to be!
     
  13. jack orchard
    Joined: Aug 20, 2011
    Posts: 238

    jack orchard
    Member

    Don't give up on it. A good machine shop can pin most cracks and save the block. An exception to this would be cracks caused by freezing. Find an experienced machinist that has done many, many of these flatheads. Do not have the block welded, as the chance of failure is much higher - then your block is probably junk. You might be lucky enough to find a crack free block. I just found 3 merc blocks in a barn. all 3 were crack-free. one last point: figure $3000 to rebuild it - even if you assemble it. Best of luck...jack
     
  14. devotion
    Joined: Apr 15, 2009
    Posts: 193

    devotion
    Member
    from idaho

    Round 3 or 4. I've lost count. As of tomorrow I am picking up a complete, rebuilt stock, 47 flathead. Wish me luck! This is after numerous other engines have found their way into my garage... Can't seem to shake the idea of the flathead. I think it's some sort of illness.
     
  15. kegmon
    Joined: Jan 11, 2013
    Posts: 9

    kegmon
    Member

    Did you have any trouble getting the oil pump(s) out of any of your blocks? It's supposed to just slide out after removing the one bolt, but mine is totally stuck...
     
  16. Russco
    Joined: Nov 27, 2005
    Posts: 4,132

    Russco
    Member
    from Central IL

    They can be a bitch sometimes. Just keep working at it it will come out.
     
  17. flatty_
    Joined: Oct 12, 2012
    Posts: 41

    flatty_
    Member
    from TX

    if cracks are pinned i need a sleeve for the cylinder - right?
    i have two cracked french blocks (both have one crack between the valves) :( and one crackfree :D which i´m rebuilding rightnow. i bought the third one cause i didn´t really trust in pinning´em..is it that reliable?
     
  18. bk53
    Joined: Feb 15, 2012
    Posts: 148

    bk53
    Member
    from Rowlett Tx

    I think if the crack extends below the deck you may need a sleeve. I'm no machinist, just went thru this process with an 8ba. several pins but no cracks below the deck so no sleeve. The thing holds pressure so wish me luck. its going back in a 53 f100 next week.
    Probably several answers to that one. It just wound up being cheaper to fix this block than keep looking for the holy grail. This was the 4th we considered. After fixing this the the machinist thinks he can fix the first one, pins and at least one sleeve.
     
  19. Are you planning on relieving the block? I cant decide if I should on my 8ba
     
  20. daddio211
    Joined: Aug 26, 2008
    Posts: 5,998

    daddio211
    Member

    Relieve it. It's not much work for a LOT more breathing.


    Posted using the Full Custom H.A.M.B. App!
     
  21. Good info. I'm jumping on the back of this thread
     
  22. HotRodMicky
    Joined: Oct 14, 2001
    Posts: 1,764

    HotRodMicky
    Member


    You should read the article about the Flatcad on here....
     
  23. gary terhaar
    Joined: Jul 23, 2007
    Posts: 655

    gary terhaar
    Member
    from oakdale ny

    4.250 welded and ground stocker or aftermarket.
    The eagle 4.250 is a 2.0 sbc rod journal so there h beam rods can be used.
    You need quite a bit of clearancing to allow them to swing in there. Mostly at the bottom of the cylinders. So much if there are sleeves there may be a problem hitting water depending on how they were installed.
    With the crank offset to one side,you need to notch both banks on one side.
    Stock rods may allow you to take less out of the cylinder bottom because of the I beam design but the larger journal may interfere with the pan rail.
    I have built them with aftermarket rods with that much arm but not stock internals.
    Over 4.125 you need to be on your game.
    Good luck
    Gary
     
  24. daddio211
    Joined: Aug 26, 2008
    Posts: 5,998

    daddio211
    Member

  25. HotRodMicky
    Joined: Oct 14, 2001
    Posts: 1,764

    HotRodMicky
    Member


    They are very similar in their stock layout.

    There are much more effective ways to gain flow then a relieve......on a Ford Flathead.
    This is backed up by flow bench test.

    For a street engine you want compression over flow
     
  26. HotRodMicky
    Joined: Oct 14, 2001
    Posts: 1,764

    HotRodMicky
    Member


    I'm building a 4 1/4 x 3 5/16 at the moment with scat crank and stock rods.

    Everything clears the block no need for grinding the block.

    Balancing the crank was a bitch !!!!!!!
     
  27. gary terhaar
    Joined: Jul 23, 2007
    Posts: 655

    gary terhaar
    Member
    from oakdale ny

    The stock rods was the answer. I used the eagle stuff,not scat.
    The stock stuff is a little sparce in the webbing,don't think I would use it in a customers motor,mine maybe if it pops I am ok with it,customers not so much.
    Who's piston did you use and was it cast or forged.
    The cast stuff has had miss shaped domes and heads become a issue when you squeeze the cr.
    I could see where balancing may be a issue,Mallory?
     
  28. HotRodMicky
    Joined: Oct 14, 2001
    Posts: 1,764

    HotRodMicky
    Member

    I used Ross Hi-Dome pistons for Navarro heads.
    Heavy as hell for a forged piston.

    Instead of Mallory my machinist cut some weights on the crank down.
    A lot of work



    I never use cast pistons.
    Always ross forged.
    They have the correct crown

    Maybe eagle cranks balance better than scat.

    Where can i buy eagle cams ?
     
  29. HotRodMicky
    Joined: Oct 14, 2001
    Posts: 1,764

    HotRodMicky
    Member


    I dont understand your comment about the stock rods.
    They clear the block
    They are strong
    They are lighter than scat rods.

    Why wouldnt you use them ??
     
  30. HotRodMicky
    Joined: Oct 14, 2001
    Posts: 1,764

    HotRodMicky
    Member


    With scat rods and crank you dont need to grind the block. 2" journal,of course

    Even the 4 3/8 works, but there i dont know about pan clearence
    Just stuck one i a block to see.
    2" journal
     

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