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Flathead bellhousing crack repairable?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by rnx69, Oct 31, 2012.

  1. rnx69
    Joined: Feb 28, 2009
    Posts: 36

    rnx69
    Member
    from Estonia

    Yesterday I found Flathead block with heads and internals from local scrap metal yard. The first thing that I saw was cracked upper bellhousing. Anyway, I got pretty good deal and rescued it from there.

    If the block itsself is salvageable (I know, it's only a small hope), what about the bellhousing? Could the crack be repaired? What about the structural integrity after repair? I will try to make some pictures later, but the crack's lenght is about half or little less of the bell's witdh.

    I have pretty hard times to identify the year of the engine too - I haven't found any stampings or castings from the block itsself, only small "H" on top of bellhousing. The heads bear 9T casting mark, as I have read, those belong to before WWII manufactured 239 CID truck engine. I haven't found much info about blocks the heads were typically bolted on - I know, that 99T castings are pretty sought after because of higher nickel content and thicker bore walls. I guess the engine is made by Ford Germany, because I found "Zyl 1" marking on one head?
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2012
  2. manyolcars
    Joined: Mar 30, 2001
    Posts: 7,520

    manyolcars

    the bellhousing is cast iron and can be welded with a Henrob torch
     
  3. Diavolo
    Joined: Apr 1, 2009
    Posts: 801

    Diavolo
    Member

    I was gonna say that a good arc welder who knows about pre and post heat would be able to do this job for you.
     
  4. rnx69
    Joined: Feb 28, 2009
    Posts: 36

    rnx69
    Member
    from Estonia

    Well, I know, it is possible to arc weld cast ion. But how strong the seam would be? I think that bellhousing is pretty structural part of engine and trans assembly?
     
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  5. RichFox
    Joined: Dec 3, 2006
    Posts: 9,406

    RichFox
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I took my Dodge block to the welder after UPS cracked the bellhousing flange. He welded it and it's fine. Cost $100.
     
  6. Flat Ernie
    Joined: Jun 5, 2002
    Posts: 8,407

    Flat Ernie
    Tech Editor

    Get a picture up when you can - all cracks can be repaired, how durable the repair is and the location of the crack will dictate what can/can't be used. As a general guide, I'd say it will be able to be used afterwards (with lots of disclaimers). ;)
     
  7. Diavolo
    Joined: Apr 1, 2009
    Posts: 801

    Diavolo
    Member

    As far as strengh, consider the location like flat ernie said. If its cracked because somebody threw a 59A block on a standard engine stand, you will just have to make sure it's in the right place prior to welding. A good welder will know what he's doing. The 59A bellhousing wasn't meant to be a structural member as much as it was meant to align and place the transmission. Since iron doesn't typically bend, I think a good welder could fillet the crack, drill the ends and weld it up with no issues. I wouldn't worry too much about it but I also wouldn't be suprised if something happened. I would take the gamble and do it if it were me.

    If the crack was in the combustion area, it would be a different repair altogether but that would also be feasible if you wanted to save the block and build one.
     
  8. porknbeaner
    Joined: Sep 12, 2003
    Posts: 40,639

    porknbeaner
    Member

    I have welded up dirt moveing equipment in the past that held together, I doubt that your flatty will ever see the stress of a dirt mover.

    I would have to see the crack but in general it sould be something that can be welded.
     
  9. rnx69
    Joined: Feb 28, 2009
    Posts: 36

    rnx69
    Member
    from Estonia

    Few pics (I hope these are not too big):

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Cracked Bellhousing:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Marking "Zyl 1", German head?:

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    Serial #?:

    [​IMG]
     
  10. tig master
    Joined: Apr 9, 2009
    Posts: 416

    tig master
    Member
    from up north

    A59a block is not hard to find get another.It will be cheaper than welding and no disclaimer.Flathead s are not rocket science just old.If you are just doing this as a future project an 8 ba is a much better choice.The valve train in a 59a is a turd.It needs to be updated to 48 and up.Crank and rods are more cost to do without an upgrade the list just goes on and on.

    T
     
  11. rnx69
    Joined: Feb 28, 2009
    Posts: 36

    rnx69
    Member
    from Estonia

    As I live in Estonia, it's almost impossible to find decent engine from here. Shipping it from US would cost way much more than the block itself.

    Could anybody decode from pics what year that engine could be? As it's got 24 stud heads, it should be made after 1938, right?
     
  12. Mr 42
    Joined: Mar 27, 2003
    Posts: 1,207

    Mr 42
    Member
    from Sweden

    Its a german Ford 29GT.
    I think its from 43-44 from the casting numbers.

    Here is some pics on mine, ita have 8BA stamped on the rods so its later .

    http://www.brandow.eu/div/29GT/index.html

    [​IMG]


    I would drill hole at each end of the crack, clean it up a bit and use brass filler and brazing upp the crack.
     
  13. rnx69
    Joined: Feb 28, 2009
    Posts: 36

    rnx69
    Member
    from Estonia

    Thanks for information, Mr 42 :)

    At the moment I have busy times removing the cylinder heads, as usual these are stuck as hell. I sprayed the studs with some penetrationg oil every day since Monday and hope that eventually the rust breaks loose.
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2012
  14. Mr 42
    Joined: Mar 27, 2003
    Posts: 1,207

    Mr 42
    Member
    from Sweden

  15. rnx69
    Joined: Feb 28, 2009
    Posts: 36

    rnx69
    Member
    from Estonia

    You mean Gaz A/Gaz AA flathead four bangers?

    These are rare, but not too impossible to find. If you are interested more about these engines, ask from user Altraditional, I'm pretty sure he could help you.
     
  16. Mr 42
    Joined: Mar 27, 2003
    Posts: 1,207

    Mr 42
    Member
    from Sweden

    yes
    I will ask Altraditional, Thanks
     
  17. Rickybop
    Joined: May 23, 2008
    Posts: 5,260

    Rickybop
    Member
    from Michigan

    I live in a farming community. There's a place in town that fixes almost anything, including all kinds of castings. Blocks, heads, bellhousings, etc. They pre-heat the part in a purpose-built fire-brick oven made for each particular piece, depending on its size. The heat is introduced with a large torch...or two. Once the part is hot enough, they weld it, and re-machine if necessary. Everybody around here goes to them. They're always busy.
     

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