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Technical flat head v8 identity

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by nnunky, Nov 20, 2016.

  1. nnunky
    Joined: May 31, 2016
    Posts: 80

    nnunky

    this is sat in my 1939 ford pick up can anybody tell me
    what series it is.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 46,694

    squirrel
    Member

    to save others the fun of opening an unknown zip file....

    pickup engine.jpg
     
    LOU WELLS, Jet96 and kidcampbell71 like this.
  3. partsdawg
    Joined: Feb 12, 2006
    Posts: 2,715

    partsdawg
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Minnesota

    ^^^^^^spoilsport ;)
     
  4. pickup engine.jpg Aluminum heads, interesting water temp in the head. Have not seen that before. Or is that a block heater?

    Sure looks like a block heater through the head. Just slip your extension cord on the prongs.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2016

  5. Flathead Dave
    Joined: Mar 21, 2014
    Posts: 2,936

    Flathead Dave
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from So. Cal.

    Yeah, I wasn't about to open it.
     
  6. Flathead Dave
    Joined: Mar 21, 2014
    Posts: 2,936

    Flathead Dave
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from So. Cal.

    Due to the water pump placement (looks like they are on the block) it looks like it could be a 1937 and beyond, 221, 21 stud. Maybe 60hp-85hp.
    Count the studs. The 221 was also made with 24 studs for a couple of years. But in 1939 the 239 24 stud came into production.
    Is the carb a one or two barrel? The one bbl carb was on the '32-'33 motor and the two bbl was on '33 and beyond, I believe.
    I'm thinking out loud...

    Hope I helped.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2016
  7. clunker
    Joined: Feb 23, 2011
    Posts: 1,613

    clunker
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Boston MA
    1. MASSACHUSETTS HAMB

    Brave man. Especially if you aren't on a Mac...
     
  8. Petejoe
    Joined: Nov 27, 2002
    Posts: 10,536

    Petejoe
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Zoar, Ohio

    I count 21 studs.
    It possibly could be an early 1938 motor.
    The later 38 blocks were 24 studs.
     
  9. Jet96
    Joined: Dec 24, 2012
    Posts: 1,164

    Jet96
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from WY

    Yup that's a head bolt heater, prob half of the motors I've pulled apart up in this neck o' the woods have them!
     
  10. Never2low
    Joined: Jan 14, 2008
    Posts: 1,122

    Never2low
    Member

    Um, pretty sure there's 24 studs there.o_O
     
  11. Count them again it is a 24 stud.
     
  12. Petejoe
    Joined: Nov 27, 2002
    Posts: 10,536

    Petejoe
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Zoar, Ohio

    Sorry. And thanks for clarifying.
     
  13. Flathead Dave
    Joined: Mar 21, 2014
    Posts: 2,936

    Flathead Dave
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from So. Cal.

    I found the "hidden" bolts behind the plastic container.
     
  14. nnunky
    Joined: May 31, 2016
    Posts: 80

    nnunky

    thanks for taking the time to reply.i will check the carb and let you know.
    somebody mentioned aluminium heads is that unusual.
     
  15. nnunky
    Joined: May 31, 2016
    Posts: 80

    nnunky

    thanks for the info,having aluminium heads is that not the norm.
     
  16. nnunky
    Joined: May 31, 2016
    Posts: 80

    nnunky

    I didn't know how else to get the file uploaded,thanks for that
    is that white metal bearings in this.
     
  17. squirrel
    Joined: Sep 23, 2004
    Posts: 46,694

    squirrel
    Member

    uh...you could maybe resize the image to make it a bit smaller, and just upload it as a jpg. At least, that's what I did to make it so everyone could see it.
     
    GreaserJosh13 likes this.
  18. White Metal? I am assuming you mean poured Babbitt bearings, the poured bearings were common place in 21studs with some crossover in 1938.
    This being a 24 stud motor, this will have traditional insert bearings. It may have 21A style bearings where on bearing set per crank journal. The bearing is shared between 2 connecting rods and is full floating. Later motors had dedicated rod bearings per connecting rod.
    This will be only told once you have the oil pan off. Over the last 70+ years it could have been rebuilt, unknown what is inside until open.
     
  19. image.jpeg Your engine is a one year only 37 Ford if it has 21 studs. 32-36 motors with 21 studs have the water pumps in the heads.In 1938,studs were increased to 24 and the water pumps are in the block as are the 37 ford blocks.
     
    LOU WELLS likes this.
  20. Your motor is a 1939-1940. It has an A on the 24 stud heads. I also don't think they are aluminum heads. Please put a magnet on them to help us out. They could be but.... I also belive 41 used a different distributor than the 39-40 diver helmet.... I could be wrong there. As to answer your ? About the aluminum heads, if they are not corroded out then they work really good. Chances are if they have been on there for many many years with water in them, then they could be junk. I would see if it turns over and if so try and fire it up....
     
  21. Also if it is stock and never been rebuilt it will have 21A rods and full floating bearings. If and when you do take it apart just remember you will have to take both connecting rods off each crank journal before the bearing will come off. Iv seen guys try And pry the bearing off wondering what the hell with only one rod off the crank. Good luck looks like a cool motor. Show us some more pictures of the truck and also where in the world your from as that sometimes has things to do with funny ol Henry ford parts.
     
  22. elmitcheristo
    Joined: Nov 10, 2007
    Posts: 351

    elmitcheristo
    Member

    If you look at the center studs located directly below the water neck, 3 in a line is 21 stud. If it has two in a row (like in the picture) it is a 24 stud. Babbitt bearings went away and were replaced with full floater inserts during 1936. If you can get a good look at the top of the bellhousing, a "59" cast into the top will tell you that it is a 46 to 48 239 ci. Parts like heads, distributors, etc will throw you off as they may have been changed over the last 75 years.
     
    cretin and paintslinger805 like this.
  23. Or you can do a pencil test. If you can put a pencil above the timing cover and it stays it's not a 59a it will be a 38-41. If the block is smooth to the top of the timing cover then it would be a 46-48 59a block. As long as there's 24 studs. Or 59L,59y iv seen a few others then just the 59a castings.
     
  24. 51504bat
    Joined: May 22, 2010
    Posts: 2,069

    51504bat
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I would see if it turns over and if so try and fire it up....[/QUOTE]
    If you are going to try and fire it up you might want to drop the pan (or the large clean out plate if so equipped) and make sure the oil pickup screen isn't all gummed up. JMO.
     
  25. My guess - is that it is a 1939 or so 24 stud, 221 cubic inch flathead Ford V8 (may have even came with the car/truck). Now with that said - God only knows if it has been bastardized, semi-fubared with all sorts of other 39-48 parts in it . . . and who knows what else. BUT, if it runs well and gets the car down the road . . . cool! LOL
     
  26. Looks like a stock 39/40 221 to me, at least all the accessories are correct for that. As paintslinger says do the pencil test on the front of the block; that'll tell you what you have...
     
  27. Flathead Dave
    Joined: Mar 21, 2014
    Posts: 2,936

    Flathead Dave
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from So. Cal.

    I see the "A" now that you mentioned it.
     
  28. manyolcars
    Joined: Mar 30, 2001
    Posts: 8,355

    manyolcars

    Do NOT try to start it. You will cause damage. Disassemble it, clean, check, rebuild properly
     
  29. nnunky
    Joined: May 31, 2016
    Posts: 80

    nnunky

    thanks for the info,i have recently bought it and it has been started
    just waiting to ship it to England.
     
  30. nnunky
    Joined: May 31, 2016
    Posts: 80

    nnunky

    thanks for the reply,what hp would it possibly be.
     

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