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Technical Finish on roadster tack strip??????

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by dirty old man, Mar 25, 2014.

  1. dirty old man
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 8,912

    dirty old man
    Member Emeritus

    Bought a nice, although somewhat warped, oak (I think) tack strip from Brookville for my roadster from the same folks. Seems to be a necessary part for top or tonneau cover.
    Nice piece, just will need some clamping to pull warpage out, sorta standard procedure for wood, I guess.
    Need to put a finish on this to protect from the hot GA sun, hoping I don't get caught out in the rain too often. But the finish needs to protect from the weather.
    I'm thinking either Watco oil or marine spar varnish. Your opinions and experiences on this appreciated.
     
  2. turdytoo
    Joined: May 14, 2007
    Posts: 1,569

    turdytoo
    Member

    Mine is covered with upholstery material.
     
  3. stakebed
    Joined: Mar 10, 2010
    Posts: 31

    stakebed
    Member
    from White, SD

    I think any varnish or urethane that is exposed to sun and weather will fail over time and need to be sanded down and redone from time to time. An oil finish you may be able to reapply a coat once a year or so without sanding to keep it up. However I once used linseed oil on a flatbed, and it attracted dirt like a magnet attracts steel grindings.
     
  4. dirty old man
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 8,912

    dirty old man
    Member Emeritus


    I know there are 2 kinds of linseed oil, one is called "boiled" and the other, IIRC, "raw". Many years ago I used one of these, don't remember which, to finish a custom made canoe paddle a friend made for me.
    A book I still have somewhere, written by a Maine guide, and titled "Pole, Paddle, and Portage" recommended the one to use, and how to use it. I followed his instructions, but don't remember which kind I used, but it was the one he said use. Paddle came out beautiful, well preservedand I still have it, just haven't been canoeing in years.
    But paddle is in my tool shed with a dirt floor, and no dust was stuck to it last time I looked at it.
    I think I'm gonna use Watco. I'm thinking when it weathers in time that I can reapply without removal from the car if I'm careful, but the varnish would require removal and sanding to refinish.
    But thanks to those who replied.
     

  5. unkledaddy
    Joined: Jul 21, 2006
    Posts: 2,865

    unkledaddy
    Member

  6. gotit
    Joined: Aug 27, 2009
    Posts: 357

    gotit
    Member

    You can coat it in fiberglass resin. There are strip canoes that are done in the fashion and I don't believe they have the matting.

    Another thing is to look at epoxy. There is resin that you can use to cast items and it is clear and very durable

    The only other option would be marine varnish
     
  7. dirty old man
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 8,912

    dirty old man
    Member Emeritus

    Not at all surprised at the durability of #7, as POR15 is very durable stuff. /but I want a more neutral, transparent coating, not painted.
    Since this is a roadster that is stored inside when not in use, and Won't be out in the rain unlees I just get caught out and can't get away from it, I think that anything will last better than it did in those tests of being out in the weather continuously for a couple years.
     
  8. pimpin paint
    Joined: May 31, 2005
    Posts: 4,937

    pimpin paint
    Member
    from so cal

    Hey,

    I think, what you're after is '' boiled '' linseed oil. " raw " linseed oil won't fully dry, and will always remain tacky. You can thin the boiled linseed oil with mineral sprits, and rub in two-three coats with a rag. I'd give a day or two between coats, and after the last coat dries, I'd buff the surface with some burlap or a rough shop rag to remove any tackyness on the surface.

    The wood you decribe sounds to be White Ash, and not Oak! Oak contains a high level of tanic acid, and when in contact with carbon steel, will cause the steel to rust. Red Oak is much cheaper than well-seasoned White Ash, and is often sold as '' interior wood '' for vehicles, but that's not a great use for this wood.
     
  9. Minwax makes a "Helmsman Spar Varnish" in gloss, semi or flat. I've used it on outdoor wood benches, birdhouses, etc. Yes have to sand and recoat every 3 to 4 years, but if stored indoors, it should protect for a longer time.
    RB
     
  10. dirty old man
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 8,912

    dirty old man
    Member Emeritus

    I suspect you're correct on the ash wood rather than oak. I took another look today and the wood is sorta springy like ash in a good canoe paddle, and the grain really isn't like oak either. Also seems like it's lighter in both color and weight.
    About decided on either boiled linseed oil or Watco oil, just haven't quite decided on which.
    I have a Mad River canoe with gunwales finished in Watco about 20 years ago hanging under the tool shed overhang, done by a now dead co-worker, so I can't ask him about it. Tomorrow I'm gonna take a close look at those gunwales and see how they've held up. Haven't even looked at that canoe in 5-10 years!
    Woodworking has never been on my list of favorite things to do, and as a consequence I don't know much about finishing it.
    Thanks yall, for the help and info.
     
  11. dirty old man
    Joined: Feb 2, 2008
    Posts: 8,912

    dirty old man
    Member Emeritus

    I suspect you're correct on the ash wood rather than oak. I took another look today and the wood is sorta springy like ash in a good canoe paddle, and the grain really isn't like oak either. Also seems like it's lighter in both color and weight.
    About decided on either boiled linseed oil or Watco oil, just haven't quite decided on which.
    I have a Mad River canoe with gunwales finished in Watco about 20 years ago hanging under the tool shed overhang, done by a now dead co-worker, so I can't ask him about it. Tomorrow I'm gonna take a close look at those gunwales and see how they've held up. Haven't even looked at that canoe in 5-10 years!
    Woodworking has never been on my list of favorite things to do, and as a consequence I don't know much about finishing it.
     
  12. adam401
    Joined: Dec 27, 2007
    Posts: 2,755

    adam401
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    If you want to oil ash you mix 30 percent boiled linsead oil and 70 percent terpentine and give it 2 coats allowing it to dry to a tack in between then finish with a coat of the opposite ratio. Wipe it with straight boiled linseed oil in the future when it seems dry. I've oiled many ash, oak and chestnut post and beam buildings and that's the industry standard
     
  13. Karl Wescott
    Joined: Aug 29, 2007
    Posts: 60

    Karl Wescott
    Member

    A couple of things here.

    As i understand (and the EV8 club judges please step in an correct) tack strips were originally upholstery wrapped, the material is placed on the body upside down, the tack strip attached to the body with the material between, then the materail is pulled over the tack strip and fastened to the "package tray". Of course a common 50's-60's treatment was to use the seat materal and pad over the package tray making the classic high rolled seat.

    Most, if not all Brookville bodys do not have the correct transition from the quarter panel to the tack strip mount. There was a definite step where the tack strip began, with a hole in the body that the front tip of the tack strip inserted into. The front top attachment stud then went through the body into the tack strip wood. If you have the common style Brookville and an original style tack strip the easiest fix is to sand the ends to fit. If you want post pix of the body and tack strips and I will try to confirm whats going on. email me at karlw (at) wescottsauto (dot com) if you do as I only occasionally check the forum and this deserves a public reply
     

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