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**February is for Bangin'** Feb 2013 Banger Meet

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Crazydaddyo, Feb 1, 2013.

  1. After measuring, that's the way I'm going to have to go as well. Thanks again for the info on the radiator...I'm too chicken to run without a fan in the Texas heat. I'm going to call The Brassworks to see what they can do for me.
     
  2. V4F
    Joined: Aug 8, 2008
    Posts: 3,927

    V4F
    Member
    from middle ca.

    electric fans have come along way . very good cooling .............
     
  3. Indian
    Joined: Nov 6, 2008
    Posts: 13

    Indian
    Member
    from Sweden

    Great solution :)
    I'm building a gow job 1926 Model T roadster with a small budget, so it's still a flathead and has a std crank - couldn't even find a EE crank. Eventually all bent hairpin Model T cranks will break I guess, but when modified for going faster it'll break faster too :(

    I wonder if there are any small diameter harmonic dampers out there? Ideally I'd like everything to look early 30's - and the front of the model T oil pan is in the way for any large diameter damper on the crank. Would like to keep the hand crank option, too, since my low weight 1915 aluminum hogshead doesn't have any place for a starter..

    Perhaps a damper could be placed higher than the crank on the fan hub, driven by chain or belt?
     
  4. That's true, I'd rather avoid anything modern though...so far my mid 1940's spark plugs are the newest things on the car.
     
  5. I think the Winfield repop dampener is a smaller dia. It is man. and sold by Antique Auto in Rosemead ca
     
  6. What's a good price range to expect to pay for a model B or C banger core?
     
  7. johnneilson
    Joined: Apr 12, 2011
    Posts: 960

    johnneilson
    Member

    Mod C cores go for a henway.
     
  8. Crazydaddyo
    Joined: Apr 6, 2008
    Posts: 3,135

    Crazydaddyo
    Member

    Some of us believe that Ford never made a "C" engine.

    I wouldn't pay more then $100 bucks for a striped unchecked block. It took me 5 cores to get 1 good, un cracked block. Only one of the cracked blocks was worth fixing. None of the cracked blocks had cracks that you could see by eye.

    It cost $125 to fix the cracked block.


    .
     
  9. Gotcha I saw this one and assumed....

    http://seattle.craigslist.org/oly/pts/3591134588.html

    Price seems kinda crazy...
     
  10. Crazydaddyo
    Joined: Apr 6, 2008
    Posts: 3,135

    Crazydaddyo
    Member

    Pass on it. That thing says money pit all over it.

    This would be a better deal.
    http://www.fordbarn.com/forum/showthread.php?t=97130

    I did a simalar deal. Paid $660 for a running B out of a commercial truck. changed the pistons. Set the bearing clearance and raised the compression with a Wiend head. Ran for another 10,000 miles.


    .
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2013
  11. it's way out of my price range. Just wanted to make sure it wasn't "going rate"
     
  12. Carter
    Joined: Mar 18, 2006
    Posts: 1,405

    Carter
    Member

    I have 3 B engines. One was rebuilt 30 years ago and had less than 100 miles on it, then stored inside and dry. Paid $750 for it
    One was a core with trans for $300, and one was part of an old homemade generator, with B radiator, grille/shell, generator, and propane carb setup for $400.
    I was very happy with what I paid for them. If you keep yours eyes and ears open, put the word out that you are looking and wait for the right deal, you'll come up with one you can afford.
    Of course, the engine out of that $400 generator is now rebuilt and Winfield equipped and I have a ton of cash into it.
    You really have to look at all of them as cores. Until they are torn apart and checked, you don't know what you are buying.

    Sent from my DROID device using the TJJ mobile app
     
  13. Gosh! The price of a cylinder block is just a small part of the cost of an engine build. In my experience, you've got to have a plan. With that, you then have to ask yourself: "Do I want to afford the time and money to do it?";)
     
  14. And then again some of us were not around in the late 40's early 50's when the parts guy at the Ford Garage would ask "Is it for a B or C?" The term C for the 33 34 counterbalanced crank engine was in common use then at least in So Ca. Not too many people actually disputed this until De Angelus did his research in the 80's or early 90's and then not until it was published in the S O S S. Then it was easily accepted by those newbies that grew up after the post war era. What remains is that is was commonly used in that period as it was in the prewar era. While It is factually true that ford never designated the engine as a C he just put a big C on the head! I can hear the corrections coming!

    Another myth, while I'm on this rant, is that guy's ran Stromberg 81's in the same era. Hell you couldn't give the things away, after all they came on those pukey little Ford 60's. In fact , you could hardly give a whole engine away unless to some one racing midgets! It was a well known fact that 97's ran the fastest on top end and that is where it mattered.

    Well, its back to the cave for me! bye bye till spring!
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2013
  15. Carter
    Joined: Mar 18, 2006
    Posts: 1,405

    Carter
    Member

    Thanks for the info from someone who has been around, Bill. Always appreciate your posts.

    Sent from my DROID device using the TJJ mobile app
     
  16. rockman29
    Joined: Jul 2, 2006
    Posts: 80

    rockman29
    Member

    Changed our timing cover to use a needle bearing cam button. Have one left listed in the classifieds if anyone is interested. Can machine another run if there is enough interest.
     

    Attached Files:

  17. I just tap the stock cover 3/4 16 and turn a piece of bronze to fit The clearance or guide tube on inner side of cover is 11/16" which is tap drill size for 3/4 16 so I just extend the hole drilling from rear side and tap from front after facing a small area for locknut to tighten against.
    Of course I have a mill and a lathe. But I don't have any for sale.
    I drill the bronze screw for oil.Also cut a groove to align and collect oil from original hole in cover
    I have a stock cover from a sprint car that has a 3/8" bolt in it. It has been tipped with a drop of braze
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Feb 10, 2013
  18. That is pretty neat.
     
  19. rockman29
    Joined: Jul 2, 2006
    Posts: 80

    rockman29
    Member

    JPB

    I think that's a smart inexpensive way of improving the stock cover/plunger.
     
  20. Crazydaddyo
    Joined: Apr 6, 2008
    Posts: 3,135

    Crazydaddyo
    Member

    Another couple of mods I'm doing for this engine is in the oil pan.
    I have noticed that when I take long right hand turns, like on ramps, that the oil pump starves as the oil runs away from it.

    So I added capacity to the pump side of the oil pan, and improved the baffles to keep the oil around the pump.

    Here is the oil pan with it's new cavity. I made it out of the left side of an A pan.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Here is what I cut of of the A pan. I cut the ends and flattened then out so that when I bent the top over, it would close of the top.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I used a rose bud and a home made break the bend the top .

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I then preped the B pan that I'm using on the new engine. I cut a window in the pump side of the pan the width of the two center baffles and the height of the oil level when it has 5 quarts in it. the new cavity is about 1/2" taller then the "full" oil level.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Because I have a ground clearance issue I am also re locating the drain plug to the side on the pan now. So the new piece will cover where the old plug was.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    After some cutting and fitting I welded the new cavity to the side of the pan and filled it with water to check for leaks.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    All done. Now I have about 1.5 more quarts of oil in the pan to flood the oil pump when I make long hard right turns.


    .
     
  21. Crazydaddyo
    Joined: Apr 6, 2008
    Posts: 3,135

    Crazydaddyo
    Member

    Here it the mods I did to the baffle.

    I was talking to Jim Brierly and asked him what he did if anything to modify the baffles to keep the oil around the pump. That is where I got this idea from.

    Jim said he likes to extend the two center baffles to slow down the oil from moving forward under braking, and back wards under acceleration.

    Here is how I did it:

    I made a template of the inside of the pan at the two baffles. The extensions fit the pan opposite of the pump tight and there is a gap on the pump side.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The knotch in the center is to let oil back into the center of the pan. The flow will be controled with a 3" hinge.

    [​IMG]


    I then spot welded the new baffles to the old baffles. As a extra measure I pop riveted the hinges in place. The baffle plate could be riveted too if you don't have a spot welder.

    Make sure the hinges move freely and do not rub the bottom of the pan.

    [​IMG]


    This is how the hinges work under braking:

    [​IMG]


    This is how they work under acceleration:

    [​IMG]


    And this is how they should work when cornering:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2013
  22. BCCHOPIT
    Joined: Aug 10, 2008
    Posts: 2,592

    BCCHOPIT
    Member

    Very Cool!!! DaddyO

    Did you open up the holes under the rods?
     
  23. Crazydaddyo
    Joined: Apr 6, 2008
    Posts: 3,135

    Crazydaddyo
    Member


    Yes, but after I took these pictures.


    .
     
  24. I welded damns in the bottom of the pan with surge gates in them. I originally had drilled the rod grooves or depressions in the baffles but noticed some scuff marks on my pistons so I now have a baffle with no added holes. I have a full pressure oil system but wanted the insurance of more oil splashing on the lower cylinder walls. This is on an A, not a B, if that makes any difference
     
  25. Awesome tech Dan, makes me wonder what Milodon did for the engine in the Carl Loveless roadster....
     
  26. Crazydaddyo
    Joined: Apr 6, 2008
    Posts: 3,135

    Crazydaddyo
    Member


    This: Look at the picture in the lower left corner.


    [​IMG]
     
  27. OK, guys, time for me to show my ignorance....er, huh....inexperience.

    I want to get my 31 Tudor running just enough to putt around. Not really interested in lights/gauges, etc. Problem is my OE wiring is TOAST! and half of it is disconnected.

    Should I:

    A) rewire it per Henry's design (6V pos. ground) and leave off the unwanted.
    B) rewire it for 6V Neg. ground and leave off the unwanted.
    C) rewire it for 12V Neg. ground with a full harness from Rebel.
    D) other option that works better that I am not smart....er, huh....experienced enough to have thought of.

    Signed
    Dim Wit (aka brett4christ)
     
  28. (double post....sorry!)
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2013
  29. Carter
    Joined: Mar 18, 2006
    Posts: 1,405

    Carter
    Member

    Brett, my vote is OE 6V positive earth wiring.

    Sent from my DROID device using the TJJ mobile app
     
  30. Bluto
    Joined: Feb 15, 2005
    Posts: 5,114

    Bluto
    Member Emeritus

    6V= POOR COLD STARTING......

    Positive ground is an original mistake.

    You can get a one-wire 12V alternator and run the stock starter on 12V. That means a one wire ALT to Starter And a switched wire to the coil/Dist.

    Pretty simple wiring :D
     

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