Register now to get rid of these ads!

Falcon/Ranchero 2.77 manual Transmission rebuild start-to-finish Tech!

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Farmer, Jan 9, 2008.

  1. Farmer
    Joined: Sep 20, 2002
    Posts: 2,068

    Farmer
    Member

    First of all, the transmission we're talking about here is the 1960-196? Ford 3 speed, 2.77 manual transmission found in Falcons, Rancheros, and Comets. Okay dudes....it's been a damn while since i posted anything tech related, mostly because i didn't have anything to work on, but I got my chance to change that when my '62 Ranchero 3spd manual transmission recently died a miserable death. Since i have no garage, or shade tree, i had to do this outside, in the frickin' rain, with no work bench, etc....MEGA FUN! so...i did all the removal of the tranny and such outside next to my building in a gravel lot. I don't have a real creeper so i used "Kansas creeper"...cardboard boxes from a large appliance. It doubles as a creeper/absorbant and works great for sliding in and out from under the car. Now, to get the party started, i found a good donor transmission on craigslist (a local online classified forum) and had that ready to do the swap. Upon initial inspection, the donor tranny looked great but wound up having a dead hub on the shaft. the inner teath were worn out and damn near gone. On top of that, the tail shaft housing and shaft from the donor tranny were around 2+ inches shorter than the one in my truck. DOHHH! So....i realized i'd be taking the two transmissions completely apart, taking the good parts from both and the tail shaft and housing i need and making one good transmission. I lucked out and have the parts to make it work from the two trannys. All i had to get was a gasket set and some fresh gear lube. Now that we have the prelude to the story out of the way, here's what i did first:
    1. chock the rear wheels on both sides, then jack the truck up in the front and get some jack stands under it to make the work scene all safe and stuff. 2. drain the transmission fluid. 3. disconnect everything going to the transmission. This includes the following: shift linkage rods from the column, speedo drive cable, and e-brake (you won't have this for safety, and this is another reason why you chock the wheels on both sides). 3.Now you're ready to drop the driveshaft. real simple...remove the two little u-bolts at the tail end of the driveshaft, slide it forward into the tranny a tad, drop the shaft rear down, and slide her out of the transmission, done. Below are some pics to show you what we've done so far. Now, in the pics, the transmission's gone already so just pretend it's still there okay?
     

    Attached Files:

    • a.JPG
      a.JPG
      File size:
      79.7 KB
      Views:
      604
    • b.JPG
      b.JPG
      File size:
      75 KB
      Views:
      673
    • c.JPG
      c.JPG
      File size:
      68.4 KB
      Views:
      575
    • d.JPG
      d.JPG
      File size:
      57 KB
      Views:
      571
    • e.JPG
      e.JPG
      File size:
      71.7 KB
      Views:
      680
    • f.JPG
      f.JPG
      File size:
      76.1 KB
      Views:
      761
    • g.JPG
      g.JPG
      File size:
      77.5 KB
      Views:
      682
  2. Farmer
    Joined: Sep 20, 2002
    Posts: 2,068

    Farmer
    Member

    Moving on...... 4. Okay, now we drop the transmission. Remove the transmission support spring from the tail shaft housing, two small bolts. Don't worry, it's not under load and won't kill you. Once you've done that, slide the spring off to the side out of the way. 5. Jack the rear of the engine up a bit with a wood block and jack at the bell housing to lift the tranny up off the transmission support. 6. Unbolt the rear transmission support on one side and swing it down so you can drop the transmission. 7. Make a platform to rest the transmission on once it comes down, or get a jack ready under it. The transmission doesn't weigh much so I just dropped it down onto my chest. You can do the same if you want to. 8. Remove the four bolts that bolt the transmission to the bell housing, starting with the bottom ones first. Leave the bottom ones in just a bit to allow the transmission to rest on them when you're ready to remove it. Now, take the top two bolts all the way out. Slowly slide the transmission away from the bell housing, remove the two lower bolts all the way out now with the transmission supported and then bring it down and out.
     

    Attached Files:

    • h.JPG
      h.JPG
      File size:
      52.5 KB
      Views:
      587
    • i.JPG
      i.JPG
      File size:
      74 KB
      Views:
      515
    • j.JPG
      j.JPG
      File size:
      60.8 KB
      Views:
      466
  3. Farmer
    Joined: Sep 20, 2002
    Posts: 2,068

    Farmer
    Member

    Now the transmission's out. store the drive shaft in a dry place and cover up the input end with a rag or plastic bag to keep it nice. I don't have a garage, so my kitchen served as the rebuild area. Thank God I have dark brown linoleum in the kitchen, plenty of room, and no wife to deal with, otherwise this wouldn't be cool. I have a little fold out table thingy from my sink that i attach when needed, and that's what i used as a work bench. Now, time to dissassemble these bad Larrys.
    Okay here we go: 9. remove the output shaft housing, and be carefull not to let the output shaft come out with the housing or your needle bearings will fall out and that sucks. Put the housing aside. 10. Remove the speedo drive gear snap ring and slide off the gear. (My speedo drive gear was shot on mine and so i pirated the drive gear off the good one, and gained a working speedometer which i didn't have before, yeah!) 11. Remove the little piece of flat rectangular metal that holds both the shafts in place from the rear of the transmission. 12. Press the idler gear shaft out of the transmission, and lower the cluster gear to the bottom of the tranny case. Kind of hard to do 'cause you can't get your hands inside there yet, so just try to not let it drop to the bottom hard. 13. Now, remove the input shaft housing/retainer, and slide the input shaft out of the transmission. 14. Remove the synchronizer snap ring near the snoot of the output shaft, and then while holding the whole synchro assembly together, slide the the output shaft out and away from the assembly. Now, put the assembly down together out of the way. Remove the shifter forks from the case. 15. Remove the reverse idler shaft from the transmission. I don't have special tools, so i used a steel clamp and a small long socket to press the shaft out. works great and doesn't hurt anything. Now, that's as far as i needed to go with the dissassembly. Below are pics of the disassembly, how it came out, and detail pics. I will try to post them in order of my steps above.....bear with me.
     

    Attached Files:

    • 28.JPG
      28.JPG
      File size:
      77.7 KB
      Views:
      1,200
    • 27.JPG
      27.JPG
      File size:
      76.2 KB
      Views:
      1,054
    • 26.JPG
      26.JPG
      File size:
      58.5 KB
      Views:
      1,005
    • 33.JPG
      33.JPG
      File size:
      64.3 KB
      Views:
      944
    • 21.JPG
      21.JPG
      File size:
      65.8 KB
      Views:
      1,036
    • 25.JPG
      25.JPG
      File size:
      64.9 KB
      Views:
      973
    • 24.JPG
      24.JPG
      File size:
      57.3 KB
      Views:
      938
    • 16.JPG
      16.JPG
      File size:
      69 KB
      Views:
      928
    • 17.JPG
      17.JPG
      File size:
      64.5 KB
      Views:
      926
    • 18.JPG
      18.JPG
      File size:
      63.7 KB
      Views:
      895
    • 19.JPG
      19.JPG
      File size:
      65.6 KB
      Views:
      911
    • 20.JPG
      20.JPG
      File size:
      73.4 KB
      Views:
      1,014
    • 22.JPG
      22.JPG
      File size:
      65.4 KB
      Views:
      882
    • 4.JPG
      4.JPG
      File size:
      69 KB
      Views:
      880
  4. Farmer
    Joined: Sep 20, 2002
    Posts: 2,068

    Farmer
    Member

    Okay...now here are a few shots of my work area- this should encourage any of you who are garage-less. It don't mean you can't work on cars!! Plus, I live on the 2nd story of my building!
     

    Attached Files:

    • 1.JPG
      1.JPG
      File size:
      70.6 KB
      Views:
      543
    • 2.JPG
      2.JPG
      File size:
      78.5 KB
      Views:
      536
    • 3.JPG
      3.JPG
      File size:
      68.1 KB
      Views:
      564
    Register now to get rid of these ads!

  5. garvinzoom
    Joined: Sep 21, 2007
    Posts: 1,169

    garvinzoom
    Member

    Great tech! Dont have the three speed but if I get one this will come in handy.

    Thanks
     
  6. Farmer
    Joined: Sep 20, 2002
    Posts: 2,068

    Farmer
    Member

    Now...let's see what i found to be the culprit in my transmission's death......(as a note: i bought this Ranchero cheap, and it had been neglected for decades. Expect that when you buy an old car, shit like this has been brewing for a long time, and it may all come apart on YOU...lol! This is directed more at the younger guys who are new to the wonderful world of old cars and wrenching, who might think that a cheap old car will be problem free for a while...think again! hahaha!)
    So.....i found the brass sychro ring (blocking ring) to be missing teeth, and missing 1/8" chunk from the ring. Also the low/reverse gear had significant wear. The Hub had only one insert remaining. the other two, as well as the brass synchro chunk had been ground up into fine metallic dust over a long period of time.The frickin' tranny oil looked like metallic copper One-Shot paint lol! It's amazing the transmission worked at all when i bought the truck, and it explains the feel of the shifting from day one since i've owned it. Check it out.....
    I also included a couple of pics of the transmissions, broke down to show how small they are. The thumbs down is the old tranny, thumbs up, the new one. And that's me in the "Von Drunk" hat(courtesy of our own Abe Lugo) after i'm done and ready to reassemble. Hope you all enjoyed this as much as i didn't lol

    oh yeah... this new transmission will be a floor-shift rather than a column 3- on the tree. My shift column/collar and whole mess is tired and i scored the vintage Hurst setup with the tranny i picked up and it's way better feeling. I'll have to cut a hole in the tranny hump/floor of the Ranchero to put it in, but that's okay. I included a couple of pics of the new/old setup for you to gawk at.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Feb 16, 2010
  7. Farmer
    Joined: Sep 20, 2002
    Posts: 2,068

    Farmer
    Member

    Cool man, thanks! I realize what i could have done better for the tech post, and will make a better one on the next go round.
     
  8. Farmer
    Joined: Sep 20, 2002
    Posts: 2,068

    Farmer
    Member

    The old one is a 2.77 and so is the donor, the only difference is the donor had a shorter output shaft and housing. All the guts are the same, same tooth count, etc. etc. i was told the short housing 2.77 might have come from a comet or falcon coupe or sedan, just not a ranchero. It'll all work fine. re: the hump, it would be overkill for clearance i'd think but it would work fine. the Hurst kit i have will only require a hole cut into the floor. I saw it in the '61 Ranchero it was in before the guy pulled it and i got it. That's the only thing that has me boggled....the short shaft on the donor tranny and it came from a Ranchero? maybe the guy swapped drive shafts at one point or something and had to have the shorter housing? Only Ford knows the answer.....
    What i wonder is why didn't the Falcons come with an overdrive to spare us all from our 3spd non synchro 1rst gear grief? lol

    Oh...here's a picture to show the tail shaft and housing length differences side by side....The shorty was from the donor, the long guy is the one i'm using. the housing looks so much bigger 'cause of the frame mount on it, and linkage, but it bolts right up. also the tail looks bigger in diam. but it's not. The long guy appears to be from a later transmission, as it's drilled to fit more than just my 2.77 box. maybe it fits behind a 4spd or toploader?
     

    Attached Files:

    • 29.JPG
      29.JPG
      File size:
      60.7 KB
      Views:
      422
  9. FiddyFour
    Joined: Dec 31, 2004
    Posts: 9,019

    FiddyFour
    Member

    Farmer... bitchen tech dude... thanks for posting it man

    for the newbies out there... THIS is what the HAMB is about
     
  10. Farmer
    Joined: Sep 20, 2002
    Posts: 2,068

    Farmer
    Member

    thanks man! at least it's what the HAMB USED to be about.....after a couple of hours it was on page 4......my stupid post about dumb gas station names got more interest than this lol....go figure....but i don't feel too bad, most of the best tech posts get buried on here by posts that are totally useless. I still love the Hamb though, despite it's Starbucks popularity now
     
  11. Maybe it's one of those Dangedhamb transmissiones :confused:
     
  12. Farmer
    Joined: Sep 20, 2002
    Posts: 2,068

    Farmer
    Member

    you mean Dangle-hiemer? lol
     
  13. eric
    Joined: Jun 4, 2001
    Posts: 1,643

    eric
    Member

    Nice Tech dude!!! lots of falcon/ranchero/comet guys on this board, me being one of them!!
     
  14. Kinky6
    Joined: May 11, 2003
    Posts: 1,765

    Kinky6
    Member

    Great tech, Farmer!

    If I can make one safety caution, though. I've never seen them fail, but as long as I've ever fooled with old cars, I've heard people warn about using those three legged split pipe jack stands that you have. (O.K., they are better than cinder blocks :D ) All the ones that I use are four leg welded dudes.

    Later, :cool:
     
  15. yorgatron
    Joined: Jan 25, 2002
    Posts: 4,228

    yorgatron
    Member Emeritus

    i'd like to nominate this for the Tech Archive,good work Farmer :D
     
  16. mustangsix
    Joined: Mar 7, 2005
    Posts: 1,296

    mustangsix
    Member

    Farmer, this was so good I had to post a link on FordSix.com. :) Hope nobody minds.
     
  17. Farmer
    Joined: Sep 20, 2002
    Posts: 2,068

    Farmer
    Member

    man, thanks Yorgatron- and mustangsix! I don't mind at all if you post it elsewhere, hell if it helps anyone at all, that's why i did it ;)
     
  18. Farmer
    Joined: Sep 20, 2002
    Posts: 2,068

    Farmer
    Member

    my gasket set came in the mail today so now i get to put the tranny back in the Ranchero! yeah!
     
  19. DesignIt
    Joined: Sep 15, 2002
    Posts: 35

    DesignIt
    Member

    Great tech article and photos! I never remember to take photos until I'm finished. Good job!
     
  20. M L
    Joined: Oct 5, 2008
    Posts: 8

    M L
    Member
    from wisconsin

    Great article, this will come in handy when I have the time to rebuild my transmission.

    You wouldn't happen to still have the extension housing from the donor transmission around, would you? I know that I have come across this thread quite a while since it was started, but gotta try, right?
     
  21. 41fordor
    Joined: Nov 9, 2008
    Posts: 74

    41fordor
    Member

    Thanks for the post! This is exactly what I was looking for. Its a hell of a lot easier (and lighter) than a C-6.

    I just bought a little 61 Falcon to make a daily driver. I grew up riding in many Falcons as a kid, those were the days. We were never stranded once. In the 70s my dad switched to Pintos, but that's another story...

    EDIT: BTW, Rockauto lists an incorrect output shaft seal. National 470059 is definitely not for the 2.77 manual trans. Try National PN 7495S which is correct and crosses to Ford PN C0DR-7052-A
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2010
  22. Farmer
    Joined: Sep 20, 2002
    Posts: 2,068

    Farmer
    Member

    thanks 41fordor!
     
  23. The_DropOut
    Joined: Mar 4, 2008
    Posts: 391

    The_DropOut
    Member

    Hey Farmer, Nice tech. I'm rebuilding my 2.77 right now.

    I want to know what rear seal part # you used. You can remember back a few years right?? LOL

    My latest attempt was a Federal Mogul #470059. But this, along with others, is too big [2.380"] and needs to be 2.253",

    I sure hope you check this dusty thread, and throw me a bone.

    Thanks.

    PS your PAD looks sweet! Lots of old school cool in that place I can tell. :)
     
  24. Farmer
    Joined: Sep 20, 2002
    Posts: 2,068

    Farmer
    Member

    I do believe it was a federal mogul bearing but the size....i cannot recall. Im sorry i couldnt help more
     
  25. Nickas
    Joined: Jun 5, 2013
    Posts: 1

    Nickas
    Member
    from Canton,oh.

    Hey Farmer.. I don't recall a warning about the bearings falling out of the countershaft when it's dropped. Just busting chops! Great thread. Mines almost back on the road. Did your gear teeth have significant wear on the first/reverse cog? Mine has me wondering.
     
  26. sdluck
    Joined: Sep 19, 2006
    Posts: 1,686

    sdluck
    Member

    My auto shop teacher taught us to cut a wooden dowel the length of the inside of the case,slide it in and push out the metal shaft,this holds the bearings in place and lets you remove the cluster and install the cluster.
     
  27. Evilfalcon1961
    Joined: Dec 22, 2007
    Posts: 421

    Evilfalcon1961
    Member
    from Ma

    How bad are these to drive with a non synchro first gear ?
     
  28. Fudster
    Joined: Feb 29, 2016
    Posts: 4

    Fudster

    I have a 65 Ranchero, 289, 3 speed manual (I assume it has a 2.77). I added a Hurst floor shifter. My problem is that the internal speedo gear is worn and so I have no speedometer. Can I remove the tail shaft housing with the transmission installed so I can replace the speedo gear? I do not want to remove the entire trans nor do I want to remove the shifter mechanism but I don't know if the tail shaft will slide out with the shifter installed.
     

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2013 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.