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F100 - How I covered my pickup box.

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by fiftyv8, Jan 19, 2012.

  1. fiftyv8
    Joined: Mar 11, 2007
    Posts: 5,157

    fiftyv8
    Member
    from CO & WA

    Since I started my engine swap thread, my project seems to have moved beyond just the engine stuff.
    There are some other ideas on this thread covering a seat replacement and rear box step.


    http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=366906&page=4

    <O:pI wanted to enclose my pickup box with some sort of cover.<O:p></O:p>
    Figured it would last longer being protected from the weather, offer a little more secure storage space to store and did not want to spend a fortune doing it.<O:p></O:p>

    I will admit that I saw this idea already made up on another pickup and just made some changes to suit my requirements and materials. <O:p></O:p>
    I wanted it to lift up like some of those new vehicle lids.<O:p></O:p>

    I found a suitable frame material which was in a previous life an old fold out sofa/bed.
    <O:p</O:p
    I chose this since the material was (light for steel tubing) and had some nice factory made bends formed.

    <O:pI laid it out flat and joined the base to the back portion and trimmed some of the metal away during this process to help reduce weight.
    <O:pDuring this process I ensured the overall sizes would fit inside my box area.

    <O:pSince the tube was so thin any cuts and joins had to be sleeved before welding back.<O:p
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Mar 7, 2014
  2. Gasoline Junkie
    Joined: Nov 20, 2010
    Posts: 333

    Gasoline Junkie
    Member

    Any more pictures? I wanna see how this looks finished!
     
  3. fiftyv8
    Joined: Mar 11, 2007
    Posts: 5,157

    fiftyv8
    Member
    from CO & WA

    Firstly, I installed side plates attaching them to the front stake pocket supports and running them back over the rear fender wells.
    These pickups come with very few attachment points in the box.<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    Once my side plates where made I could then go about using them as a base to build all the lifting and support stops etc required to get the lid to lift and sit down correctly.<o:p></o:p>
     

    Attached Files:

  4. fiftyv8
    Joined: Mar 11, 2007
    Posts: 5,157

    fiftyv8
    Member
    from CO & WA

    At the tailgate end I made from some light rectangular tube an end piece which would support my home made locking mechanism which is activated outside by a garage door key lock.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
    I used what I could find and this lock was not my 1st choice.<o:p></o:p>
    I also decided to install a slim line 3rd brake light into this end piece I was constructing since I had one given to me a couple of years back.<o:p></o:p>
    I believe it is from a Toyota and is LED.<o:p></o:p>
     

    Attached Files:


  5. fiftyv8
    Joined: Mar 11, 2007
    Posts: 5,157

    fiftyv8
    Member
    from CO & WA

    I found me some old Ford spring loaded hood hinges that seemed to good for this project.
    The trick is to have hood hinges that lift and move away from the cab back to ensure no contact during the lifting up process.

    I reinforced the hinge end of my frame and with a few little mod's attached the hinges.
    I made up some solid piece of plate which attched to my hinges and then I welded the plate in the correct position to my newly installed side plates.

    By doing it this was it allowed me to get all my adjustments and rest position set up before committing to welding it in.
    I then just tack welded these hinges into position, remove the side plates and fully welded them on the flat off the vehicle.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. fiftyv8
    Joined: Mar 11, 2007
    Posts: 5,157

    fiftyv8
    Member
    from CO & WA

    During my build, I decided that just maybe the spring loaded hood hinges alone were not going to be strong enough to lift the weight of this lid.
    So I decided to also include provision for some gas struts to assist the springs.
    As you will see as I post more progress that both were required.
    I also took this opportunity to install a couple of tie down points at my lid rest support positions in the box. I have always found a lack of tie down points a problem from time to time.
     

    Attached Files:

  7. motoandy
    Joined: Sep 19, 2007
    Posts: 3,321

    motoandy
    Member
    from MB, SC

    Cool idea. Lookin good. Hurry up and finish and take more pics!!!
     
  8. fiftyv8
    Joined: Mar 11, 2007
    Posts: 5,157

    fiftyv8
    Member
    from CO & WA

    A test lift proved that all was working well and I could proceed to installing the latch mechanism and attach the sheet cover.
     

    Attached Files:

  9. Salty
    Joined: Jul 24, 2006
    Posts: 2,259

    Salty
    Member
    from Florida

    Neat to see someone doing something similar....I am also building a hard top tonneau cover though mine will be using jack screws and will open from the passenger side...I'm actually getting ready to start building my framework right now...

    Nice job!
     
  10. Cool... got a spare sofa bed ??
    I'm looking for ideas for a cover on the Scout. THis has me thinking again. (Thanks)
     
  11. fiftyv8
    Joined: Mar 11, 2007
    Posts: 5,157

    fiftyv8
    Member
    from CO & WA

    Here are a couple pic's of the 3rd stop light I installed in the back edge of the liftup lid and a side section pic of the rubber cushion edging (sorry about the quality of this pic) I am using to trim the edge of the cover sheet off and ensure the rain water does not get into the box any more.
     

    Attached Files:

  12. fiftyv8
    Joined: Mar 11, 2007
    Posts: 5,157

    fiftyv8
    Member
    from CO & WA

    My buddy got me a big piece of this covering material.
    It is a composite consisting of a center layer of some kind of plastic with a outside layer of aluminum both sides.
    I came with a painted coating on it as well as plastic protective layers which needed to be removed during the install.
    I am not sure how durable this paint coat will be, but for now I'll just run with it.

    I rounded the corners slightly for looks and to accommodate a smoother install of the rubber cushion edge strip.
    The cover that inspired me to do this project was screwed down to the metal frame, however I thought more holes equals more places to leak, so I have taken a chance on a construct mastic glue supposably suitable to gluing metal to metal even if painted.

    I was instructed to clean the frame with an acetone solution (not thinners) and just use a tube gun and cover all the frame and then place the sheet and weight it evenly once in position and leave it 24 hours.

    If I made any mistakes during this process, it would be that probably I used a little too much glue as you will see in the pic's and also maybe just over weighted it slightly, which as caused to a couple of high points thru the sheet.
    The high points appear to be caused by the deforming of the tube frame where the bends are formed.

    Any way judge for yourself.
    I am pretty happy with the outcome and it will sure deliver me what I wanted, which was a weather proof box and extra secure storage space.
     

    Attached Files:

  13. huskersnb2
    Joined: Jan 7, 2012
    Posts: 35

    huskersnb2
    Member
    from nebraska

    what are you going to use to cover the op vynil or makes a fibergalss cover
     
  14. BobF
    Joined: Dec 30, 2004
    Posts: 230

    BobF
    Member
    from Poway, CA

    I made quick/cheap cover for our daily driver PU several years ago after I redid the bed wood.
    It sits outside so the daily dew/sun cycle takes its toll real quick.
    Go here for a look http://bobsplayce.net/tcover1a.html
     
  15. MEDDLER1
    Joined: Jun 1, 2006
    Posts: 1,590

    MEDDLER1
    Member

    Nice! Mine is almost the same, I used 68 impala hood hinges and mini bearclaws on the rear. Iam going to revisit my design though soon because I have found that with all the flex my bed has in it the hinges have a tendancy to come out of adjustment. It doesnt take much flex to change things I have found. Also some dumbass who didnt know me tried to get in the back at a show and when confronted he slammed it down and bent some stuff up. I dont think you will have the flexing issues that I do for sure those ford fleetsides are stout!!
     
  16. fiftyv8
    Joined: Mar 11, 2007
    Posts: 5,157

    fiftyv8
    Member
    from CO & WA

    Nice to know about similar projects by yourself and others.
    If you vist my 1960 F100 engine swap thread you will see that I have boxed my chassis basically from the radiator all the way back to my rear axle and install IFS so I am anticipating little or no flex no that has been done.

    http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=366906&page=2
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2012
  17. MEDDLER1
    Joined: Jun 1, 2006
    Posts: 1,590

    MEDDLER1
    Member

    Cool thread and truck! Hell even without boxing yours should be more stout than mine. Ford has always been good at making trucks trucks ya know!
     
  18. olskool34
    Joined: Jun 28, 2006
    Posts: 2,458

    olskool34
    Member

    Oh Dibond, I work with it every day. I am a sign maker and this material is used for a number of things in the sign business. Looks great so far.
     
  19. fiftyv8
    Joined: Mar 11, 2007
    Posts: 5,157

    fiftyv8
    Member
    from CO & WA

    My buddy tells me that is one of few sheet products that is wide enough to fit the style side box width.
    It seems OK to me, I am just curious about how well the painted external face will survive the elements.
     
  20. fiftyv8
    Joined: Mar 11, 2007
    Posts: 5,157

    fiftyv8
    Member
    from CO & WA

    Looks good, I am also thinking actuators as an upgrade.
    My box is quite long and the further distance the end is away from the hinges, any extra weight has a big effect on the lifting effort required by the springs and gas struts I am using.

    Just the extra weight at the end added by the 3rd brake light and the fixings plus the latch mechanisms etc was noticeable on the lifting effort required once installed.
     
  21. k32t
    Joined: Jan 2, 2011
    Posts: 294

    k32t
    Member
    from Hog town

  22. Dan in Pasadena
    Joined: Sep 11, 2009
    Posts: 862

    Dan in Pasadena
    Member

    Any finished pictures of this?
     
  23. Shane Spencer
    Joined: Oct 3, 2009
    Posts: 2,161

    Shane Spencer
    Member

  24. fiftyv8
    Joined: Mar 11, 2007
    Posts: 5,157

    fiftyv8
    Member
    from CO & WA

    Here ya go!
    I am not sure what you are exactly looking for, anyways here are a couple of general shots.

    I am also planning to install amber rear flashers, you can see the holes ready for the LED flashers.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jan 17, 2013
  25. husker
    Joined: Mar 14, 2006
    Posts: 352

    husker
    Member

  26. fiftyv8
    Joined: Mar 11, 2007
    Posts: 5,157

    fiftyv8
    Member
    from CO & WA

    I've been making good use of it lately and that cover has been great, keeps the weather out and also roaming hands and eyes.

    I am trying to keep the old patina and that cover is just starting to fade out nicely to match the rest of it.

    I guess it was worth the effort...
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2013
  27. 1971BB427
    Joined: Mar 6, 2010
    Posts: 6,535

    1971BB427
    Member
    from Oregon

    Nice looking cover, and great ingenuity! Really cool that it looks so good, and you built it on a budget!
     

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