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Hot Rods Epoxy Cast iron fix???

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by mdimages, Jan 24, 2020.

  1. mdimages
    Joined: Sep 13, 2019
    Posts: 62

    mdimages
    Member

    So I found my culprit that has been feeding my exhaust antifreeze... I took down my model "B" block today to find an old repair. Someone stitched the crack and them threw a weld over the top. The stitch was not overlapped and was never properly sealed. So with what I had here in the garage, I tried to preheat, braze, and postheat only to find more cracks... I was able to cover most of the cracks and smooth it out with a bur-bit, but I am not totally confident with the fix...

    Does anyone out there know of a product that I can use to coat over the top of this. (Epoxy/Sealer???) They are hairline cracks that don't deal with a lot of pressure, I just want to run this motor till I upgrade to something later down the road.

    ***** I can't stitch where all of the cracks are.. so if it can't be brazed, I'm wondering if a epoxy or sealer will hold up to the temp.

    Anyone have luck with this, or can recommend a product??

    Thanks,
    Matt
     
  2. mdimages
    Joined: Sep 13, 2019
    Posts: 62

    mdimages
    Member

    Pictures
     

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  3. mdimages
    Joined: Sep 13, 2019
    Posts: 62

    mdimages
    Member

    Also why when I upload photos they are upside-down...?
     
  4. 2OLD2FAST
    Joined: Feb 3, 2010
    Posts: 2,013

    2OLD2FAST
    Member
    from illinois

    In the past , I have successfully used " Marine-tex" epoxy to seal cracked marine engine blocks.
    It should be available on line or at West Marine among others
    I doubt it will hold up to exhaust temps ??
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2020
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  5. 6sally6
    Joined: Feb 16, 2014
    Posts: 960

    6sally6
    Member

    Seems like there's a dev-con epoxy product that will hold up to the heat.
    Shoot.........these guys that use it to build up the inside of there intakes and other race applications....I bet they make sump'in!
    6sally6
     
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  6. mdimages
    Joined: Sep 13, 2019
    Posts: 62

    mdimages
    Member

    Temp is the issue... It really is just for a skim coat. Thanks for the suggestion. I will have to look into it more. Thanks
    Matt
     
  7. mdimages
    Joined: Sep 13, 2019
    Posts: 62

    mdimages
    Member

    Its just for a skim coat that doesn’t deal with really any pressure... there has to be something out there. I’m sure I can run it as is. Just would like to seal it the best I can. I’ll have to look them up!
    Thanks
    Matt
     
  8. tb33anda3rd
    Joined: Oct 8, 2010
    Posts: 15,408

    tb33anda3rd
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    1. Connecticut HAMB'ers

    are you left handed and taking the photos with a phone? 3950799-8c317577532ea79c978e74092e9eca6b.jpg 3950800-3cd72de5016fb85dca7c0ecf1fb60b49.jpg 3950801-6e282400af3492907a418ff38defe4e5.jpg
     
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  9. 24riverview
    Joined: Jan 13, 2008
    Posts: 825

    24riverview
    Member

    No personal experience with it yet but this product was recommended to me by a local welder when I asked about welding a crack on the outside of a boat exhaust manifold. The outside of my manifold (water side) will never get as hot as what you're working with though.
    https://www.jbweld.com/product/j-b-extremeheat
     
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  10. mdimages
    Joined: Sep 13, 2019
    Posts: 62

    mdimages
    Member

  11. mdimages
    Joined: Sep 13, 2019
    Posts: 62

    mdimages
    Member

    I seen that. 2400degrees!! I’m pretty sure my brazing rod melts before that.. If so it can withstand what I need.
     
  12. birdman1
    Joined: Dec 6, 2012
    Posts: 777

    birdman1
    Member
    from USA

    I know I am a dumba__,why can't it be welded with a good cast iron rod?
     
  13. mickeyc
    Joined: Jul 8, 2008
    Posts: 952

    mickeyc
    Member

     
  14. mickeyc
    Joined: Jul 8, 2008
    Posts: 952

    mickeyc
    Member

    The problem area is well exposed. You may consider finding a diesel engine repair/ rebuild shop. Competent shops often weld, braze or use some specialty alloy solders to repair cracked or broken cast engine components. They have proven methods
    of proper preheat to prepare the effected area for welding and to reduce oil impregnated into the
    effected areas as well. The shop will post heat to relieve stress and reduce chances of re cracking. Proper cast
    metal repair is a multi step process. You would probably have to tow the vehicle to them or bring the motor only. There is a shop here in the New Orleans area that has helped guys with these issues for many
    years. Just a suggestion, something to consider.
     
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  15. mdimages
    Joined: Sep 13, 2019
    Posts: 62

    mdimages
    Member


    I agree with you 100%, that stripping it down and taking it to a shop is the best and most professional fix. I just don't want to strip the motor down all the way and do a rebuild if I will be swapping it out down the road. it ran strong before. I would like a car this next year to putt around on. It won't be a hotrod till a couple years doe the road. just not in the cards.. I planned on building up this motor if it was a good block, so I'm glad I found this before I invested more money in it. so it is kind of a blessing in disguise...

    Matt
     
  16. mdimages
    Joined: Sep 13, 2019
    Posts: 62

    mdimages
    Member

    So I am goin to give this a try! Plan is that I will smooth this out in a couple days and reassembled the motor back to the stock condition, once all the gaskets and miscellaneous parts come in. The next step would be to run it on and off for maybe a couple hrs. Pull off the exhaust manifold and inspect the area. If it doesn't hold, then I’m on to either a motor swap (if I can find a good A motor,) or who knows.... Id rather enjoy the car this cruise night season. Haven’t had a runner in 10+years, been playing with the bikes for the past couple.

    (This can be a little science experiment for all of us. And I guess a product review!)

    Thanks to all that helped. I will keep you guys informed!
    Matt
     

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  17. BJR
    Joined: Mar 11, 2005
    Posts: 6,105

    BJR
    Member

    Did you drill a small hole at each end of the crack to stop the crack from continuing to run, before you brazed it?
     
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  18. gas & guns
    Joined: Feb 6, 2014
    Posts: 370

    gas & guns
    Member

    A temporary repair that may last a couple years with minimal effort may be liquid water glass.
    Sodium silicate.
    Years ago I worked at junk yard. We had an old loader with a cracked head. It would dump water into exhaust. We drained all antifreeze, added water and a quart of liquid sodium silicate. Started it and let it run. At first it was steaming like crazy from the cracks in the head. Slowly over the course of about 25 min, it was steaming less until not at all.
    The old loader run like that with daily use for another year.
     
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  19. DOCTOR SATAN
    Joined: Mar 21, 2014
    Posts: 712

    DOCTOR SATAN
    Member
    from okc

    Liquid glass.....
     
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  20. mdimages
    Joined: Sep 13, 2019
    Posts: 62

    mdimages
    Member

    The the cracks were in places I could not get to, The place I covered had already been stitched, but not properly... More crack were seen from other places after heat applied. Some were pre existing that we not able to be seen after cleaning. Im sure the heat added to the stress.
     
  21. mdimages
    Joined: Sep 13, 2019
    Posts: 62

    mdimages
    Member

    I will get a bottle of this as well. why not at this point!
    thank you,
    Matt
     
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  22. mdimages
    Joined: Sep 13, 2019
    Posts: 62

    mdimages
    Member

    I will get a bottle of this as well. Thanks!
     
  23. pirate
    Joined: Jun 29, 2006
    Posts: 408

    pirate
    Member
    from Alabama

    You might try a product called Devcon. It come in several variations from liquid epoxy to a epoxy putty. Stuff when cured bonds very well to ferrous surfaces and is very tough. Do a google search for Devcon and it is sold in a lot of places.
     
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  24. mdimages
    Joined: Sep 13, 2019
    Posts: 62

    mdimages
    Member

    I will also be using this. Thanks for the suggestions
     

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