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Hot Rods Engine turning or Damascening

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by lothiandon1940, Sep 14, 2016.

  1. nrgwizard
    Joined: Aug 18, 2006
    Posts: 1,166

    nrgwizard
    Member
    from Minn. uSA

    You know, maybe it was just corrosion? Awful weird, though... I'll have to look closer when I can get to them. Don't do well at posting pics.Wasn't slamming them, I *like* the '55 Speedster dashes. ;) .
    ;( . Marcus...
     
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  2. Here is mine. 1/4" aluminum a friend cut out on his plasma table. Used a 7/8 dia. alum impregnated rubber tool on a 5/16" grid on my drill press.

    Edit:I made a grid of 5/16" squares on a piece of 3/4" plywood, (think graph paper) and mounted it to my drill press table. Mounted the gauge panel to a rectangle piece of 3/4" plywood so I could follow the grid. Started on the left side of the panel. pull the tool down hold for a few seconds, move a square, repeat Do a line, go back to start square, move down a square, repeat.

    Gauge Panel - Copy.JPG
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2019
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  3. Thanks for the tip on carbide provider, David. This dash is terrific! I like the blue indicators.
     
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  4. VANDENPLAS
    Joined: Dec 14, 2009
    Posts: 2,377

    VANDENPLAS
    Member

    Might be a stupid question but how do you keep it all straight

    Use an x-y vise?
    Blueing lines?



    62DCC9AA-5937-41AB-A9C2-005284698FF5.jpeg
    Sucks but I know it’s neither of these:confused:
     
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  5. Runnin shine
    Joined: Apr 12, 2013
    Posts: 3,052

    Runnin shine
    Member

    I clamped a long rectangle wood “table” to my drill press surface. I would reposition a long backstop every time I finished a row. I clocked each dowel half’ish move by hand and good ol’eyeball as I slid the entire stainless sheet to the left. My drill press doesn’t have enough reach for the whole piece I did. So I had to flip after so many rows and do it in the opposite direction to keep the pattern going.


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  6. nrgwizard
    Joined: Aug 18, 2006
    Posts: 1,166

    nrgwizard
    Member
    from Minn. uSA

    Well, I seriously hosed that one up... (face-palm...). Found one of the 2 loose dashes I had, + checked the 2 in the cars, aww...shucks. I don't know what the hell I was remembering, but the full swirl pattern was easily visable on the '55speedster & the '58 GH dash. Even though they are a bit rough. What I remembered was the swirls were almost gone, & the little triangles 'twixt the rounds were kinda dark n slightly deep, giving the look of round circles spaced properly. Now I wonder where I saw that. Maybe on one or another dash panel that was very corroded. I did have a '56GH that the AL was very dull & not right, & a '61 that was even worse. All of the dashes I have/had were OEM, so now I don't know what/where I saw htat. Sorry for the mis-remembering. Some thing about CRS, or maybe my toys-to-be have been hidden/covered up just too long. ;( . David in post#57 pics are absolutely correct.
    Marcus...
     
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  7. David Gersic
    Joined: Feb 15, 2015
    Posts: 2,166

    David Gersic
    Member
    from DeKalb, IL

    [​IMG]

    I made an extended table for my drill press. Figured out where to start, and drew a baseline there on both the X an Y axis. I clamped my metal yardstick on the baseline, using its measurements for each horizontal pass. I measured and moved the yardstick for each row, changing the offset from the center point to alternate where each row started.

    [​IMG]

    The first few rows are slow going. After a while you get in to a rhythm and it picks up speed. Move piece, pull handle, hold for a two count, move piece, repeat. Move yardstick. Repeat.

    A real XY table would be nice. I don’t have one.



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    Last edited: Jul 22, 2019
  8. TWKundrat
    Joined: Apr 6, 2010
    Posts: 146

    TWKundrat
    Member

    Gramps said he used to use a cork with lapping compound in a drill press back in the 40's. Not sure if this was on stainless or aluminum or nickel?
     
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  9. Runnin shine
    Joined: Apr 12, 2013
    Posts: 3,052

    Runnin shine
    Member

    I[​IMG]
    I marked where my gauges would go to save a little time an a lot of trouble. The lapping compound will also scratch the hell out of the work if you handle the piece a lot. I went through quite a bit of blue shop towels wiping off excess as I went along. This scuffing wasn’t a problem for me cause I am going for a aged “patina” finish. But it’s not SEMA quality for sure.



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    Last edited: Jul 22, 2019
  10. David Gersic
    Joined: Feb 15, 2015
    Posts: 2,166

    David Gersic
    Member
    from DeKalb, IL

    I thought about doing that, but didn’t have a good way to mark the circles. I did mark the gauge locations by drilling 1/16” holes for the centers.



    Sent from my iPad using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
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  11. While searching for something else completely unrelated I found these pictures. Acres of engine turning on the dash panels of these Chrysler Imperials from 1932, or thereabout. But then check out the contrasting finish on the panels just around the the gauge cluster. Anyone familiar with what that finish is called, or how to duplicate it? o_O

    That should keep somebody busy experimenting out in their shop. :rolleyes:

    1061997-15361.jpg 1092602-1536.jpg 1093116-1536.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2019
  12. ^^^^^Wow! Beautiful!^^^^
     
  13. Bandit Billy
    Joined: Sep 16, 2014
    Posts: 6,549

    Bandit Billy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    The back of my SS license plate backer I made.
    upload_2019-7-23_13-24-9.png
    You cant see them once it was mounted but I know they're there.:cool:
    upload_2019-7-23_13-25-37.png
     
  14. GordonC
    Joined: Mar 6, 2006
    Posts: 1,987

    GordonC
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    And now we do too!!:D
     
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  15. Pat Thompson
    Joined: Apr 29, 2012
    Posts: 195

    Pat Thompson
    Member

    here is a firewall I did for a gents Ford truck. I used a 11/2 diameter to do it, mail[1].jpg
     
  16. It does make your eyes feel good just lookin' at it, don't it? And those are some mighty purdy gauges too! :D
     
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  17. jnaki
    Joined: Jan 1, 2015
    Posts: 4,509

    jnaki

    Hello,

    We were introduced to this circle turned look at the various car shows we went to in the early years. We never had a drill press, so we tried steel wool on aluminum plates, using our fingers for the turned look. As long as we kept a straight line pattern, it looked OK. Obviously, not show quality, but, we had fun doing that steel wool/fine sandpaper turning on various metal surfaces.

    By the time we were in high school metal shop with all of the proper machinery, we were able to make some small coasters or plates for photo mounting with the now, machine turned pattern on the whole surface. It was in a straight line and looked like a professional did the work.

    It was a good thing the aluminum plates and coasters were not big, as the mistakes happened and a new sheet was put into play. We could not picture ourselves doing something like this on various hot rod/custom car parts. We were satisfied that we learned something from our experimental days.

    It was not Damascening, as machine turning is another completely different process.

    Jnaki

    Several years ago, I found a small aluminum plate. I got out the steel wool and did some finger turning. It looked good, but raw. So I turned the plate over and used wet/dry sandpaper in the turning, circular pattern. That looked better than the steel wool. It was like I was back in the high school metal shop class, experimenting with those techniques.

    When my brother and I started our engine building /speed parts business in 1959-60, we went to a printer and wanted him to make us some cards imprinted with the engine turned look. I even had sheets of thin aluminum from the Douglas Aircraft Surplus Yard all ready. He said that it was an impossibility to have that look, screened on aluminum.

    But, he did have a sheet of card stock that looked pretty much the same. So, I designed the printing areas and he ran off several hundred cards for our small engine building/speed shop parts business. They were well received and kept us supplied with some extra money.

    upload_2019-7-27_3-49-10.png
    https://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum...und-in-an-old-car.26438/page-32#post-12501966
     

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