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Technical Engine mounts for early Olds into ‘51 chevy coupe

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by J_J2, Jul 25, 2020.

  1. Ive done a few they are really easy. You just have to treat the frame properly. It’s a thinner material than most frames in that top hat style. I like to make flanges that bolt any crossmember or brackets to the bottom of the frame rail as they were from the factory.
     
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  2. J_J2
    Joined: Jan 15, 2020
    Posts: 175

    J_J2
    Member

    That kind of stuff is good to know, I really appreciate that!


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  3. Rusty O'Toole
    Joined: Sep 17, 2006
    Posts: 9,334

    Rusty O'Toole
    Member

    Why didn't you say so? That makes putting the engine in much easier. Reworking the frame and suspension is a big job, getting it to work right, with no bump steer and correct steering geometry is the challenge. There have been discussions on this topic before, some members have done straight axle gassers and know the secrets.
     
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  4. J_J2
    Joined: Jan 15, 2020
    Posts: 175

    J_J2
    Member

    I will definitely be full of questions and Will definitely appreciate any help I will be all ears!


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  5. Rusty O'Toole
    Joined: Sep 17, 2006
    Posts: 9,334

    Rusty O'Toole
    Member

    One secret is having the right caster, camber and toe in to the axle. Much of this depends on putting it together right in the first place although there is some adjustment that can be done later. The other part is to set up the steering so there is no bump steer. That means, if you hold the steering wheel steady, the wheels track straight ahead as the wheels go up and down. This is hard to achieve with cross steering unless you have a Panhard rod parallel to the steering link. Most cars and trucks that had a straight axle from the factory, had the drag link parallel to the spring and slightly shorter than the distance from the spring mount to the axle. Later model cars had the fixed end of the spring at the front, with the steering box ahead of the axle and the shackle at the back. The suspension works better this way and it gets the steering out of the road of the engine.
     
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  6. Rusty O'Toole
    Joined: Sep 17, 2006
    Posts: 9,334

    Rusty O'Toole
    Member

    Last edited: Jul 31, 2020
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  7. J_J2
    Joined: Jan 15, 2020
    Posts: 175

    J_J2
    Member

    I got the speedway kit. I went ahead and got new Chevy spindles brakes etc. because the stuff that’s on the car now is pretty beat up.
    I’ve been Trying to read as much as I can about putting in a straight axle set up steering etc. And trying to glean knowledge on here from people who’ve actually built these things, and know a hell of a lot more than I do!


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  8. Hnstray
    Joined: Aug 23, 2009
    Posts: 11,645

    Hnstray
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Quincy, IL

    In no particular order:

    Yes, the Olds is heavier than the Chevy 6, but not by as much as is suggested. Stock Stovebolt 6’s out weighed SBC V8’s by almost 100 lbs, which puts it around 600 lbs. An early Olds V8 is about 670/700.

    The Chevy and Olds (76 & 88) bodies are GM ‘A’ body shell derived and share many exterior skins/panels and glass. They have completely different floors and firewalls. The Chevy firewall vertical ribs were almost always cut away for SBC installs and most certainly would be for an Olds installation. Same for parking brake mechanism.

    Olds have longer wheelbases, all ahead of the firewall. Chevy chassis and front suspension are totally different from Olds (much of which is shared with Pontiac and Buick).

    This one, I admit, is speculative on my part.....if utilizing a stock suspension and steering system, I can’t imagine not having interference between the Chevy steering box and/or drag link and the Olds head and exhaust system. Not saying it can’t be managed, but would expect work would need to be done. Since the OP announced he is doing a straight axle conversion, that should be much less an issue in this case.

    I agree the Hurst engine mounts (original or good repro) would be the best choice. Likewise the post above that showed the (easily duplicated) corresponding compatible frame adapters is a no brainer.

    The comments about the light gauge metal in the Chevy chassis are spot on. Any place on the frame rail (top, bottom or side) that is going to have something significant welded/attached to it, should have a reinforcing plate/pad welded (or bolted) on with a larger ‘foot print’ than the piece being attached.

    Ray
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2020
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  9. J_J2
    Joined: Jan 15, 2020
    Posts: 175

    J_J2
    Member

    Thank you!


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  10. mgtstumpy
    Joined: Jul 20, 2006
    Posts: 8,355

    mgtstumpy
    Member

    Chevy used top-hat frame, Olds was totally different as it used a conventional frame. Chevy front cross-member is removable whereas Olds isn't as it's part of frame. 2 x different animals altogether. Olds uses steering box with idler arm however Chevy uses box with centre bell-crank on front cross-member so clearances may be an issue. Olds was designed for V8 with Chevy an I6. Olds frame is wider at front to accommodate a V8 when compared to the tapered Chevy frame. Then you have to contend with those body firewall legs that require modification or elimination altogether.
    [​IMG]
    upload_2020-8-1_10-43-47.png
     
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