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Technical elect. fan

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by joee, Jun 27, 2017.

  1. joee
    Joined: Oct 9, 2009
    Posts: 472

    joee
    Member

    I"ve run many elect. fans and they've worked well. I just put a pusher fan on a roadster I'm building. I had to nip the corner off one fan blade as it was just touching a part of the bracket I made to hold the fan. I had to cut one small section of the guard around the fan to get to the blade. This go me to thinking if I removed the entire guard a lot more air would pushed by the fan as the guard blocks some the air to the fan. I would think 30% of the air is being blocked by the guard or is it possible the guard is designed so that in fact isn't blocking any air and pulls the air around the bars in the guard.......anyone have any thoughts???????
     
    Hudson31 likes this.
  2. grimmfalcon138
    Joined: Jan 14, 2010
    Posts: 164

    grimmfalcon138
    Member
    from az

    I was always taught that air is lazy, and just because you can move it doesn't mean you can make it go where you want it to go. I guess I personally would be worried about the guard acting as a shroud, and if you removed it you would not force the air in the direction you need it go.
     
  3. joee
    Joined: Oct 9, 2009
    Posts: 472

    joee
    Member

    u may have a point....I.ll' have to do some thinking
     
  4. southcross2631
    Joined: Jan 20, 2013
    Posts: 3,993

    southcross2631
    Member

    Air takes the path of least resistance and should be directed on where to flow or it will go where it is easiest. You will lose some effectiveness of the fan. I hope this helps.
    Just look at nascar and you will see how air flow is directed through the front of their cars.
     

  5. fergusonic
    Joined: Nov 11, 2007
    Posts: 221

    fergusonic
    Member
    from Kokomo, In

    A picture of the fan would be interesting.
     
  6. You just had to trim one blade? I thought that all the blades were the same size, so if ya trimmed one you'd have to trim them all.
     
    Hnstray likes this.
  7. hotrodharry2
    Joined: Nov 19, 2008
    Posts: 638

    hotrodharry2
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I agree with Pat59, I've never seen an electric fan with different size blades. They almost have to be the same length to balanced or they'd vibrate.


    Sent from my iPhone using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  8. Jalopy Joker
    Joined: Sep 3, 2006
    Posts: 25,257

    Jalopy Joker
    Member

    Why need electric fan especially as a pusher? Post pics to help us help you.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  9. My thought exactly. HRP
     
  10. seb fontana
    Joined: Sep 1, 2005
    Posts: 6,591

    seb fontana
    Member
    from ct

    My thought is an electric fan in not traditional..But a note that mechanical fans usually have blades that are not spaced equally or are equal in size but od diameter is held all the same..Helps with noise reduction; takes that school bus noise away..This construction method can also apply to electric fans..
     
  11. joee
    Joined: Oct 9, 2009
    Posts: 472

    joee
    Member

    it's just a plain old spall 16" fan......the yaw on one blade was just a hair difference and it made a ticking noise so I trimmed the corner off.....runs fine . the engine is to far away to run a mech. fan and there's no room to run a puller fan
     
  12. G-son
    Joined: Dec 19, 2012
    Posts: 664

    G-son
    Member
    from Sweden

    With a shroud that might not be a problem.
     
  13. hotrodharry2
    Joined: Nov 19, 2008
    Posts: 638

    hotrodharry2
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I agree, Electric fans are not traditional, knowing this has been discussed and I've seen threads closed over this, they become a necessary evil due to limited space etc.
     
  14. joee
    Joined: Oct 9, 2009
    Posts: 472

    joee
    Member

    I contacted one of the fan makers and they said I would pick up a bit more flow but didn't recommend it. i would think because of safety reasons
     
  15. G-son
    Joined: Dec 19, 2012
    Posts: 664

    G-son
    Member
    from Sweden

    With a fan mounted straight on the radiator the biggest restriction to flow is the radiator itself - all the tubes and fins are packed tight together, not alot of space for the air to pass through, and there's turbulence in there too. As long as the guard is not designed in a really crazy way it should have minimum effect on the air flow when the fan is mounted on the radiator.

    If the fan uses a shroud so it feeds a much larger area of the radiator than the area just the fan covers that might change.
     
  16. unkledaddy
    Joined: Jul 21, 2006
    Posts: 2,864

    unkledaddy
    Member

    Sounds unusual.
     
    scrap metal 48 likes this.
  17. joee
    Joined: Oct 9, 2009
    Posts: 472

    joee
    Member

     

    Attached Files:

  18. Jalopy Joker
    Joined: Sep 3, 2006
    Posts: 25,257

    Jalopy Joker
    Member

    pic just makes things more confusing - need pic further back to see more of your unique project
     
  19. joee
    Joined: Oct 9, 2009
    Posts: 472

    joee
    Member

    couple more
     

    Attached Files:

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