Register now to get rid of these ads!

Technical Edelbrock TR1

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by Eh!Bob, Jan 6, 2020.

  1. Eh!Bob
    Joined: Mar 23, 2014
    Posts: 43

    Eh!Bob
    Member

    I just got offered an old Edelbrock TR1 tunnel ram ( bread box ) And am wondering if they are as bad as look ? I read a lot of horror stories about them blowing up etc , but just wonder if anyone has first hand experience with one ?
     
  2. Mike VV
    Joined: Sep 28, 2010
    Posts: 2,390

    Mike VV
    Member
    from SoCal

    I saw a couple back in the day with problems. I also saw them run just fine.
    Yes, they ARE big empty buckets just waiting for a bad tuneup. read that rich running, hard starting, dumping fuel into the lower part of the box
    But again, I've seen them run well...for the day..!

    One way to protect yourself is to fill the lower part of the box. Epoxy, bondo, sheet aluminum and weld in place... you pick.

    They are relatively short runners, so you'd better have a quick revving engine, a lot of gear, or just need high rpm power.

    Need detail..!
    Is this for racing, the street. Engine, car...etc., etc.
    It won't work well in a 4200lb, small Chevy, Monte Carlo, with 3.55 gears and a 2000rpm converter..!!
    See how details might mean something..?

    Mike
     
  3. Fordors
    Joined: Sep 22, 2016
    Posts: 3,699

    Fordors
    Member

    My wife’s cousin has one on a 350, with a solid lifter Crower cam and two 1850’s with direct linkage. It’s in a ‘31 Tudor and pulls real strong with a M-21 and 3.55 gears.
    After a road trip to OKC he had the top off and there was about a 1/2” of gas sitting in the plenum. That could be a potential bomb with a backfire. Edelbrock did make a filler for the TR-1 that would eliminate the puddling problem and reduce the plenum volume. The smaller plenum might help the bottom end.
     
    swade41 likes this.
  4. DDDenny
    Joined: Feb 6, 2015
    Posts: 15,046

    DDDenny
    Member
    from oregon

    In the early 70's a friend of mine had one on a 327/ two Holleys in a T-bucket and I remember him spending quite a bit of time dialing it all in but boy did that thing scoot.
     

  5. 402BOSSMAN
    Joined: Jul 26, 2015
    Posts: 343

    402BOSSMAN
    Member

    If you don't want it I'd be interested in purchasing it. @Eh!Bob
     
  6. Eh!Bob
    Joined: Mar 23, 2014
    Posts: 43

    Eh!Bob
    Member

    I have not picked it up yet , but I bought it from a buddy it comes with 2 390 holley carbs and linkage . I did some research on this tunnel ram and I guess edelbrock made a plate to" fill the puddle area in the bottom " If any one has pics are more info on modifying the TR1 tunnel ram that would be great !
     
  7. raven
    Joined: Aug 19, 2002
    Posts: 4,614

    raven
    Member

    If you choose to fill in the empty areas in the lower potion , you can extend it the fill to the top of the lower half and thereby extending the runner length. That’s what I’m doing with mine.
    t


    Sent from my iPhone using H.A.M.B.
     
  8. sunbeam
    Joined: Oct 22, 2010
    Posts: 5,271

    sunbeam
    Member

    A 327 in a T bucket has always been a hand full. A 300 hp T Bucket and a 550 hp chevelle will run about the same hp to weight and the T will break less stuff. Weight loss is usally the cheapest Horse power.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2020
  9. Mr48chev
    Joined: Dec 28, 2007
    Posts: 29,541

    Mr48chev
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I'm thinking that there were a few magazine articles about filling the lower part of the box and doing some other mods to make them safer and work better back years ago.

    A bit of reading says that the early ones had that pocket in the lower half while the redesigned later versions didn't.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2020

Share This Page

Register now to get rid of these ads!

Archive

Copyright © 1995-2021 The Jalopy Journal: Steal our stuff, we'll kick your teeth in. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.

Atomic Industry
Forum software by XenForo™ ©2010-2014 XenForo Ltd.