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Early Ford axles - worn perch bolt hole fixes?

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Rem, Jan 9, 2012.

  1. Rem
    Joined: Mar 6, 2006
    Posts: 1,256

    Rem
    Member

    I've been tidying up my selection of early Ford front axles, and got them mostly straight and tidy, but there are one or two worn perch bolt holes. So, any good ideas on fixing this problem? The way I see it, once the hole starts to get worn, mainly along the axis of the axle, every bump in the road causes the perch to move towards the axle centre, and over time will just wear the holes even more, also beating up the perches.

    I don't really want to drill the holes oversize (stock is 11/16" I think) to sleeve them as that would weaken the axle in that area. I doubt I could throw some TIG weld far enough into the hole to take out all the slop (obviously reaming to size after welding), but it is an option, I guess.
     
  2. JohnEvans
    Joined: Apr 13, 2008
    Posts: 4,883

    JohnEvans
    Member
    from Phoenix AZ

    A .060 wall aprox. sleeve will fix it and not hurt a thing.
     
  3. grock 31
    Joined: Dec 5, 2010
    Posts: 13

    grock 31
    Member
    from felton ca.

    Good Question..........any other fixes?
     
  4. thunderbirdesq
    Joined: Feb 15, 2006
    Posts: 6,985

    thunderbirdesq
    Member

    Absolutely nothing wrong with sleeving that axle.
     
    lothiandon1940 likes this.

  5. Rem
    Joined: Mar 6, 2006
    Posts: 1,256

    Rem
    Member

    Thanks guys, sleeving it would be the easiest option, and probably the way I'll go. Anyone else with other ideas? I had wondered about getting it metal-sprayed, but wasn't sure if they'd be able to get the adhesion firing it down a hole, rather than straight at the surface?
     
  6. Mike Moreau
    Joined: Sep 16, 2011
    Posts: 291

    Mike Moreau
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Loctite has a product used in industry that may work. It is used for exactly what your problem is, oversized cylindrical holes, bearing pockets etc. Don't have a product number or specifics on proper application. No much help, I know, but it's something you can check if you are interested.
     
  7. Rem
    Joined: Mar 6, 2006
    Posts: 1,256

    Rem
    Member

    Thanks Spitbucket, hadn't thought of that option. Had a look at Loctite 3478, which looks interesting. A bit pricy, but by the time I've made up sleeves and done all the machining, pressing, reaming, etc., it might be a viable alternative, and if it didn't work out then sleeves could still be used instead.
     
  8. kevin mac
    Joined: Feb 21, 2007
    Posts: 106

    kevin mac
    Member
    from toledo,oh

    sleeved a pretty loose one once....worked fine ....think car is still driven some ., been 20 years kev
     
  9. lake_harley
    Joined: Jun 4, 2017
    Posts: 1,486

    lake_harley
    Member

    Reviving an old thread, but since it's pertinent I figure why start a new one? I have a Model A axle under a rolling stock chassis right now that seems really loose. I think some of it is in the wishbone bores, but it seems loose enough that I suspect the axle perch holes are loose too.

    If drilling out perch holes to install a .060" sleeve, would 4130 chrome moly tube be appropriate to use, or something else, like D.O.M.? Do you do a perimeter weld of the sleeve to the axle top and bottom (TIG?) or just a couple thousandths press fit into the opened up hole and call it good? I'd expect to need to ream to size once the sleeve is installed.

    Also wonder if the perch holes are parallel? I'm thinking they are, so I'd think a fixture to hold the axle properly and keep a "flat" reference point while doing the machining in a mill would be a good way to keep everything in order.

    Thanks, in advance.

    Lynn
     
  10. Just a thought as I havent tried this. Put a couple spot welds on the perch on one side of the shaft where it passes through the axle. Should take up the slack.
     
  11. If your good with your tig welder; you can run some passes around the inside of the bores about 1/2" deep both top and bottom and then ream them out to 11/16". You may also find the top, bottom, or both surfaces of the axle may be worn from the wishbone moving around; again easy to build up and cut back to 2-1/4" height.
     
  12. Dedsoto
    Joined: Jan 7, 2014
    Posts: 127

    Dedsoto
    Member
    from Australia
    1. Aussie HAMBers

    bit of copper pipe worked for me, hammer in to the housing weld up the ugly, drive the pipe back out and clean up with grinder and file.

    20170620_190049.jpg
     
  13. brading
    Joined: Sep 9, 2019
    Posts: 412

    brading
    Member

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