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Technical Duvall frame casting, how to prep for glass?

Discussion in 'Traditional Hot Rods' started by PurHell, Oct 5, 2018.

  1. PurHell
    Joined: Dec 17, 2004
    Posts: 375

    PurHell
    Member
    from So Cal

    I’ve got got an older Duvall aluminum frame casting. I’m trying to find the “correct way” to cut and channel it for glass. I haven’t had any luck searching out the process, only how to mount to the cowl. Thanks for any help on the subject.


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  2. hfh
    Joined: Oct 22, 2012
    Posts: 223

    hfh
    Member
    from Western MA

    IMG_2258.JPG The groove in my windshield was cut on a Bridgeport. It is about 1/4" deep and slightly over 1/4" wide. A glass shop should be able to tell you just what they want.
     
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  3. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 14,379

    alchemy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I've seen guys say (but I've never tried it) that you can cut aluminum with woodworking tools with carbide bits. Maybe get a good router and route the groove into it?
     
  4. Te alum framework is modle specific,,,,not a universal fit to all roadsters.
     
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  5. Blues4U
    Joined: Oct 1, 2015
    Posts: 3,880

    Blues4U
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    from So Cal

    That doesn't really address his question about how to cut and channel it for glass, does it?
     
  6. PurHell
    Joined: Dec 17, 2004
    Posts: 375

    PurHell
    Member
    from So Cal

    She’s a Beauty! Talking to a Glass shop is probably a good idea before cutting. I did find late last night Speedway’s instructions for the thickness of the glass. I think theirs ’s 6 or 6.6 mill off the top of my head.

    Cutting that groove is going to be interesting, I’ll have to check in with some of my machinist buddies. I have a mill but I’m not sure what the best way to tackle that cut is? The other part that has me a bit baffled..it looks like on the outside edge of the frames they have a dog leg cut to screw through and lock down the glass. The straight cut in the middle seems relatively easy.


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    Last edited: Oct 5, 2018
  7. hfh
    Joined: Oct 22, 2012
    Posts: 223

    hfh
    Member
    from Western MA

    IMG_2268.JPG IMG_2266.JPG I think my machinist friend sort of cut the groove freehand. I think he had a bearing that went against the frame that helped him with the depth of cut. After the groove was cut, I made patterns for the glass shop out of 1/4" lauan plywood. The glass is held in with silicone. The glass shop can help you with the correct adhesive.
     
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  8. sliceddeuce
    Joined: Aug 15, 2017
    Posts: 1,970

    sliceddeuce
    Member

    I`d dog it down to the mill table and walk around it w/ a keyway cutter.
     
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  9. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 14,379

    alchemy
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    I'm guessing he doesn't have access to a mill, otherwise he probably wouldn't have asked the question. Maybe he can make a new friend who has a mill?
     
  10. sliceddeuce
    Joined: Aug 15, 2017
    Posts: 1,970

    sliceddeuce
    Member

    refer to post #6
     
  11. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 14,379

    alchemy
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Oh. Maybe he can make a new friend who has experience with a mill.
     
  12. sliceddeuce
    Joined: Aug 15, 2017
    Posts: 1,970

    sliceddeuce
    Member

    I can see how that would be beneficial.
     
  13. bryanyeskie
    Joined: Jun 13, 2016
    Posts: 157

    bryanyeskie
    Member
    from Hixton

    Wood working tools work on aluminum
     
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  14. At the risk of being pedantic, the frame we are seeing is not a Duvall. It is more of a Hallock style.
     
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  15. a boner
    Joined: Dec 25, 2004
    Posts: 5,189

    a boner
    Member

    And some time to kill!
     
  16. dana barlow
    Joined: May 30, 2006
    Posts: 3,539

    dana barlow
    Member
    from Miami Fla.

    Looks in your nice photo,that you have a top?,I'm interested in how the windshield header is made an how it holds to windshield ???Thanks
     
  17. hfh
    Joined: Oct 22, 2012
    Posts: 223

    hfh
    Member
    from Western MA

    IMG_1995.JPG IMG_1994.JPG I don't have very good pictures of the top but it's made of maple and oak. (I wanted it to be like the old woodie roofs). I used steel to join the windshield header parts together in the center. That steel piece is also a way to connect the top to the windshield in the center. I will also have steel connectors to the windshield side posts but I am still working on the design.
     
  18. dana barlow
    Joined: May 30, 2006
    Posts: 3,539

    dana barlow
    Member
    from Miami Fla.

    Very interesting,nice work too,thanks !
     
  19. PurHell
    Joined: Dec 17, 2004
    Posts: 375

    PurHell
    Member
    from So Cal

    Thanks for all the replies .. yeah I do have the mill, I’m probably capable of cutting the channel..still feel better if I can sucker my machinist buddy. I could see a router with the carbide bit probably working pretty well for the channel too. When I looked at the photos of a finished Duvall windshields the outside post has kind of overlap cut into the aluminum to screw through and hold the glass. That’s the one that really has me puzzled. What way to cut that without losing a lot of material? It must be something obvious that I’m not thinking of ...
     
  20. sliceddeuce
    Joined: Aug 15, 2017
    Posts: 1,970

    sliceddeuce
    Member

    Hmmm....Aren`t there very small counter-sunk screws that attach through the top piece and into the cowl posts ? Maybe have your machinist pal cut a mortise/tenon on those pcs. and drill/tap with them clamped together.
     
  21. PurHell
    Joined: Dec 17, 2004
    Posts: 375

    PurHell
    Member
    from So Cal

    Yep.. he told me to bring it by and hell take a look. I was surprised he didn’t have a really good answer for cutting that overlap without losing a lot of material. If worse comes to worse I guess I’ll break out the jeweler saw...


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  22. sliceddeuce
    Joined: Aug 15, 2017
    Posts: 1,970

    sliceddeuce
    Member

    And I guess that would be a tongue and groove or some sort of half-lap joint...Some carpenter I am...………...
     
  23. PurHell
    Joined: Dec 17, 2004
    Posts: 375

    PurHell
    Member
    from So Cal

    Yeah, looks like a half-lap joint 3/4”-1” I’m guessing.. i’m with you, I’m no carpenter.. I like metal, you can always weld it back like the ‘ol man use to say...


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  24. sloppy jalopies
    Joined: Jun 29, 2015
    Posts: 3,101

    sloppy jalopies
    Member

    I snagged some 3/8" x 3/8" x 3/8" 20 ga. steel channels at work years back...
    you could clear a 3/8" wide flat along the upper and inner surfaces... drill small holes for tapping, countersink 'em...
    slightly enlarge the matching channel holes and punch or hammer a clearance "dent"...
    now tap the w/s holes to anchor the channels... use countersunk screws...
    must be wider at the top [3*] to let the glass be dropped/ forced down...
    this should let the glass fit flat across the bottom of the channel...
    use stainless, aluminum or paint it to match something... HIH...
     
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