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Dual carb fuel line ideas

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by scoop, Mar 27, 2011.

  1. scoop
    Joined: Jul 4, 2001
    Posts: 1,306

    scoop
    Member

    I need some ideas for a fuel line for a dual carb setup on my 292 six,I did this on a 54 Chevy pickup years ago but for the life of I can't remember what I did.I'm running two 1 bbl Rochester carbs,I have the hard line as far as the first carb,then I ran into fitting problems.I really don't want to run hose,but if I have to so be it.I want it to look good cuz it's an open engine.I you have pics please post them.Thanks.
     
  2. Buddha Doll
    Joined: Oct 14, 2010
    Posts: 90

    Buddha Doll
    Member

    Get a tubing bender and flaring tool and you can make some trick stainless lines that you will be proud of and will only have to do once...
     
  3. carbking
    Joined: Dec 20, 2008
    Posts: 3,087

    carbking
    Member

    Second the idea on the tubing bender and the flaring tools.

    Bluepoint makes an excellent hand-held bender for up to 3/8 inch line, which may be clamped in a vise.

    Snap-on makes an excellent hand-held flaring tool. Learn how to make double flares, and make your own lines. I would suggest steel rather than stainless.

    There are a plethora of different fittings available. Ask you local parts house counter man to obtain a Weatherhead catalogue for you.

    Jon.
     

  4. scoop
    Joined: Jul 4, 2001
    Posts: 1,306

    scoop
    Member

    I've got both tools,trying to make that sharp of a 90 degree bend the tube kinks.Went to both of the parts places in town could'nt find anything that would fit the carbs,different types of threads.Of course it was getting close to closing time so they were in a hurry to get out of there.I'll try again when they and I have more time.
     
  5. draggin'GTO
    Joined: Jul 7, 2003
    Posts: 1,772

    draggin'GTO
    Member

    I agree with the use of Weatherhead fittings and steel tubing rather than stainless. Stainless is very difficult to put a double flare on and also very hard to make seal.

    The tubing shown below is 3/8" steel brake line, 5/16" line size should be more than plenty for the fuel lines on an inline six dual carb setup. The brass inverted flare Weatherhead fittings and steel line shown were all sourced at my local NAPA.

    Personally I prefer the OEM look and safety of the steel lines and Weatherhead fittings. :cool:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Ruiner
    Joined: May 17, 2004
    Posts: 4,145

    Ruiner
    Member

    If I recall correctly carb fuel lines are straight pipe thread and not the tapered pipe thread, which is why they often have a sealing washer between the fitting and carb body...personally I'm a sucker for symmetry, so a fuel block located halfway between the carb inlets with identically shaped fuel lines really looks sharp to me...
     
  7. dmw56
    Joined: Jan 1, 2008
    Posts: 709

    dmw56
    Member

  8. Buddha Doll
    Joined: Oct 14, 2010
    Posts: 90

    Buddha Doll
    Member

    try a 37 degree flare and anneal the stainless before you flare it. Not saying you can't make a nice set with the Weatherhead fittings, but use as few of the fittings as possible. Nothing screams amateur hack job like multiple fittings and adaptors/reducers.
     
  9. carbking
    Joined: Dec 20, 2008
    Posts: 3,087

    carbking
    Member

    For multiple carb setups, the factories generally would have a fuel block with inverted flare male fittings on both ends of the lines, and a fitting into each carburetor with a female inverted flare to the lines. There are exceptions. Prior to 1958, compression fittings were more common than inverted flare fittings.

    A couple of common examples would be the tripower 1958-1963 Pontiacs with a four-way fuel block and three lines (one to each carburetor) from the fuel block. Beginning in 1964 the tripower pontiac used a fuel block that actually screwed into the front carburetor; thus only two lines were necessary.

    A more complex setup was the tripower 1957 Pontiac. Compression fittings were used; with 3/8 line from the pump to a "T" screwed into the front carb, 3/8 line from the front carb to another "T" at the center carb, and 5/16 from this "T" to a 90 degree on the rear carb. Yes, you read that right. The "T" on the center carb had 1/8 pipe male into the carb with compression 3/8 in and compression 5/16 out.

    Jon.
     
  10. Scoop, looks like CTfuzz had the same problem as his 90 degree bend is kinked.
     

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  11. t.canter
    Joined: Sep 13, 2006
    Posts: 11

    t.canter
    Member

    On a 235 with dual rochesters on an offenhauser intake, I found that a dual inlet chrome line from an old holley was almost a perfect fit. I had to spread it apart just a fraction. It looked pretty good.
     

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  12. Engine man
    Joined: Jan 30, 2011
    Posts: 3,476

    Engine man
    Member
    from Wisconsin

    Do the carbs use steel lines like brake lines? That's what Rochester carbs normally have. You should be able to find lines and fittings to fit.
     
  13. 1oldtimer
    Joined: Aug 21, 2003
    Posts: 8,025

    1oldtimer
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    friends A.....the flare nut are from home depot used for regular plumbing, but just looked right.
     

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  14. carbking
    Joined: Dec 20, 2008
    Posts: 3,087

    carbking
    Member

    Over the years, the factories have used copper, aluminum and steel. I personally prefer steel.

    Jon.
     
  15. I wonder when copper was typically used. I like copper and aluminum as they can be cleaned and polished but like the strength of steel. Hmmm decision decision.
     
  16. carbking
    Joined: Dec 20, 2008
    Posts: 3,087

    carbking
    Member

    While it may have been used later, the 1966 Olds is the last vehicle I am certain used copper.

    Polishing either copper or aluminum will cause "work hardening" and premature failure.

    Jon.
     
  17. Get a good quality bender and flaring tool. They will last a lifetime and you will be surprised how often during your life you will pull them out of the tool box. It will take some practice, tubing is cheap. Use steel. These are a few pics of lines I made for my 62 NSS Pontiac with everything from my neighborly NAPA dealer. It took a couple shots before I got it.
     

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