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Do it at home steering wheel repair

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by ol fueler, Sep 13, 2013.

  1. ol fueler
    Joined: Oct 6, 2005
    Posts: 935

    ol fueler
    Member

    Has anyone had much luck (or any luck) trying to repair a steering wheel .

    I have had no luck locating a decent wheel for my 64 Park Lane mercury.The wheel on these cars is part clear plastic and part colored textured plastic with metal rings separating the segments. The colored segment always is shrunk leaving gaps but the un-shrunk part is usually all good. The clear part is always all cracked to bits or completely gone.
    I am thinking of trying to use perhaps some rubber hose split and secured so as to be a mold to pour clear resin in-- any idea if that may work . Any other ideas welcomed.
     
  2. barstowpo
    Joined: Jun 27, 2012
    Posts: 232

    barstowpo
    Member

    I have the same issue with the same type of wheel. Mine is clear and black and would look cool if restored.
     
  3. Jagman
    Joined: Mar 25, 2010
    Posts: 345

    Jagman
    Member

    Contact Dennis Crooks at Quality Restorations - all he does these days is steering wheels, if it can be done he'll be able to do it for you....

    http://www.qualityrestorations.com/
     
  4. ol fueler
    Joined: Oct 6, 2005
    Posts: 935

    ol fueler
    Member

    Oh I am sure he could probably do it , but I have seen the prices on restoring a wheel like this 800 to 1400 dollars pretty much.. I can't bring my self to put that much in one small piece of a car.
    I was asking if anyone had tried it themselves.
     

  5. crazy_tonguezz
    Joined: May 16, 2013
    Posts: 376

    crazy_tonguezz
    Member
    from glendale

    thats actually one of the projects i was going to work on. i know i can repair the painted part , at work we use some pretty cool stuff that would be perfect for steeeringel repair... but was also asking around as to what is best to use for the clear plastic. . ill let you know how mine goes after i do it.
     
  6. flatheadgary
    Joined: Jul 17, 2007
    Posts: 878

    flatheadgary
    Member
    from boron,ca

    Eastwood sells a repair kit. i don't know if it will work for you though. i have never had any luck trying to repair one.
     
  7. Bbook
    Joined: Jan 23, 2011
    Posts: 23

    Bbook
    Member

  8. Kiwi 4d
    Joined: Sep 16, 2006
    Posts: 3,156

    Kiwi 4d
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Eastwoods is just basic PC7 reboxed with lots of other bits like sandpaper etc . PC7 is the way to go on a painted rim. Clear plastic Hmmmm.??
     
  9. crazy_tonguezz
    Joined: May 16, 2013
    Posts: 376

    crazy_tonguezz
    Member
    from glendale

    at work we use this for bumpers and headlights and many many other uses . it flows real nice and gets into crack nice and deep
    http://www.handsontools.com/3M-08237-Semi-Rigid-Parts-Repair-200-mL-_p_77283.html

    and we use this ontop , stuff is amazingly easy to sand.
    http://www.ellsworth.com/3m-automix-5885-ez-sand-200-ml-cartridge/?gclid=CIu0_JaWyrkCFap7QgodskgAqw

    because i have it available at work , this is what im going to use on the portion that is painted. i have confidence in the product and already know its characteristics and limitations.
     
  10. 1955IHC
    Joined: Aug 20, 2013
    Posts: 636

    1955IHC
    Member

  11. Ned Ludd
    Joined: May 15, 2009
    Posts: 4,274

    Ned Ludd
    Member

    Like this?
    [​IMG]

    I haven't done it, but I've heard someone describe how he restored a '40s Bristol steering wheel. I don't see why the same process wouldn't work if you use clear resin for the appropriate bit, and split the pour into four segments. Be warned, though: it is time-consuming and labour-intensive.

    The process is, remove all the plastic from the wheel rim. Split some garden hose of an ID slightly greater than the wheel rim OD. Place that over the metal steering wheel core, with suitable spacers to keep the two from touching. Make sure the hose closes up neatly where it was split: it might be necessary to cut reliefs where it meets the spokes etc. Now wrap the hose with masking tape, first in a few spots to make sure the split closes neatly, then more and more to build up a fairly sturdy mould. Drill a hole to pour the resin in (or four in your case) and a few vents for displaced air to escape. Mix resin and pour until resin comes out of the vents.

    Once the resin is set the tape and hose can be stripped. Now the PITA part: filing the new rim down to the correct profile, filing in finger-grips, and sanding and polishing it to the required finish. The abovementioned Bristol wheel was painted black rather than moulded in that colour. Presumably the paint used was up to the job. But then, that wheel didn't have metal inserts or anywhere paint could begin to chip.

    As I say, I haven't done it myself, but that wheel came out looking new and stock.
     
  12. 1955IHC
    Joined: Aug 20, 2013
    Posts: 636

    1955IHC
    Member

  13. ol fueler
    Joined: Oct 6, 2005
    Posts: 935

    ol fueler
    Member

    This is the kind of help I was hoping for, 1955IHC, the crystal clear sounds just about right, now to figure out how to order it and hope it comes in a fairly small amount because it most likely is very expensive . Optical quality anything is sky high, priced some optical quality glue recently it was over 100 dollars a pint.
    Thanks for confirming that using rubber hose as a mold is on the right track,your Merc Wheel is BEAUTIFUL!
    Where do you park that car at night? :)
     
  14. 1955IHC
    Joined: Aug 20, 2013
    Posts: 636

    1955IHC
    Member

    Ol fueler. I would on YouTube for some videos on making molds and casting. There are ways that you can make the repairs to your wheel with putty. And then make an exact mold. You would then remove the old material from the wheel and cast a replica right over the wheel.

    Sent via Western Union Express
     
  15. Feo
    Joined: Oct 1, 2008
    Posts: 121

    Feo
    Member

    Cool tips think I'll repair the one in my truck.

    Posted using the Full Custom H.A.M.B. App!
     

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