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Technical Deep paint scratch

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by usmile4, Mar 18, 2014.

  1. usmile4
    Joined: Jul 28, 2005
    Posts: 700

    usmile4
    Member

    While working around the shop today I had a piece of sheet metal fall over on the rear quarter of my 51 Chevy. I got a 2" scratch all the way through to the primer. What is the best way to repair this and repaint it. The paint is Deltron 2000 Autumn Copper Pearl and clear coat.

    thanks for the help.
     
  2. chopolds
    Joined: Oct 22, 2001
    Posts: 5,781

    chopolds
    Member
    from howell, nj
    1. Kustom Painters

    Sand the scratch, feather it out pretty far, so you can't feel or see the edge. Primer/seal it, sand it again to be sure there is no visible edge ( I always guide coat) , blend the base color, and clear the whole panel.
    I know you can't clear the whole panel, but you have to try and minimize where the new clear ends. Even when using a blender to mate the new clear to old, it is tricky getting a perfect clear blend. Esp when you cut and buff.
     
  3. May be difficult to blend a spot fix into that colour paint, being a pearl but options are fairly limited unless you feel like repainting the whole panel.

    sent via classroom note. pass it on
     
  4. roddin-shack
    Joined: Apr 12, 2006
    Posts: 2,414

    roddin-shack
    Member

    Times "2", but be very patient with drying times.
     
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  5. Good tip but go one step futher. Instead of the model airplane brush go to an artist supply store or Michaels and you can very fine high light brushes.
     
  6. pin-striping brush works great. "sandpaper" meaning 1000 to 2000 grit. make sure you clean the brush before applying the clear. An airbrush is even a better way.
     
  7. This may work with a single stage paint but how do you apply the clear on a BC/CC system as BC has no gloss and no UV protection.
     
  8. banginona40
    Joined: Mar 5, 2007
    Posts: 754

    banginona40
    Member

    I've done a fair amount of repairs similar to your issue. Cars, guitars, furniture.
    I usually surround the scratch with masking tape and drop in some finish with a toothpick or even a pin head. It does take numerous coats to build up level. I then use cork backed sanding blocks wrapped in whatever grit sand paper to level out, being careful to not rub through the surrounding areas. Allow plenty of time for shrinkage and polish out. Of course with your color It will be difficult to match perfectly. This method works well if you don't want to get out the spray gun and completely redo. I have also used
    SEM spray can lacquer at times to protect. Obviously this is not a completely unnoticeable repair but it may get you by.
     
  9. pimpin paint
    Joined: May 31, 2005
    Posts: 4,940

    pimpin paint
    Member
    from so cal

    Hey,

    I don't know this colour offhand, but was there pearl added to the clear coat or jus the base? There's a big difference in pullin off a real , undectable match if there was pearl added to the clear!

    Any chance the paint damage happened in an area where two or more panels intersect, or body/character lines will enable you to hide your blend? For small repairs like these I like an old Pashe Model H air brush. This will allow you to fog in just the correct amount of colour, and blend in the clear, after you've correctly prepped the damage. I've found touch up brushes won't allow you to blend in a metalic, for a dead-on match!;)
    If the damage happened in the middle of a panel, you'll probably wanna go with a blending clear and a much bigger spray pattern and blend.


    " Meanwhyle, back aboard The Tainted Pork "
     
  10. usmile4
    Joined: Jul 28, 2005
    Posts: 700

    usmile4
    Member

    The pearl is just in the base. Unfortunately, the scratch is just on the quarter right where the gas filler door would normally be (filler door was removed and smoothed over.)

    I'm not familiar with "a blending clear". Is that a special clear or just blending with clear? As you can probably tell, I'm a real novice when it come to paint.

    Thanks for all the help and encouragement.
     
  11. usmile4
    Joined: Jul 28, 2005
    Posts: 700

    usmile4
    Member

    Is there any best primer/sealer to use? Can you explain "using a blender to mate new clear to old"?
     
  12. pimpin paint
    Joined: May 31, 2005
    Posts: 4,940

    pimpin paint
    Member
    from so cal

    Hey,

    Given where the damage happened on the panel, a touch-up brush ain't gonna get it!:(

    I'd first wash the panel down with a good grease and wax remover, and plenty of clean rags. Sand and prime the damage to an area bout 3/8'' all around the scratch. Next, block sand the primer with 600 wet to jus beyond the edge of the primer. I'd next sand an area all around the primer, probably the size of a cigar butt with 2000-2500 wet & dry. You won't be shooting colour into this area, but you will be melting your clear coat into this sanded area. Shoot your base coat, and work on jus covering the primer. Depending on the colour, it might take 3-5 coats. Next, clear the colour, but try and fade the last two-three coats just shy of your sanded area. A blending clear or "blender'' can be made from blending solvent and a medium or high solids clear, and is used to melt the clear coat into the surrounding panel. Shoot you ''blend'' alittle jucy, but avoid running it, and fade it into the surrounding panel with you gun triggering. Let it dry, well, coloursand and polish.

    You may get lucky and get a good match on the colour, or you may go home in last place!:eek: I'd say ''draw down'' cards on the colour, are gonna be you best friend for a dead-on match.


    " Humpty Dumpty was pushed "
     
  13. flamed34
    Joined: Dec 30, 2009
    Posts: 733

    flamed34
    Member

    I agree with the airbrush. Two days ago, while doing the final buff on an off-topic car, I burned through on an edge. It's a blue pearl paint. I broke out the air brush, applied several coats to the damage then pulled back and applied a few more light coats in widening circles. I cleaned the airbrush and came back with clear.

    It was the first time I used an airbrush to fix this kind of damage and I have to say, it was amazingly better - I didn't have to mask off massive portions of the car to prevent overspray and it only took a tiny amount of paint.
     
  14. pimpin paint
    Joined: May 31, 2005
    Posts: 4,940

    pimpin paint
    Member
    from so cal


    Yeah, with paint repair work, sometimes too much paint on a repair surface can really kill an otherwise good match! On a pearl or try-coat job it's just about a must!
     
  15. usmile4
    Joined: Jul 28, 2005
    Posts: 700

    usmile4
    Member

    I do have an airbrush that I got as a door price, but I' have never used it. I just might try that first. The worst that could happen is I will have to sand it off and then I will be right where I am now, so what do I have to loose?
     
  16. chopolds
    Joined: Oct 22, 2001
    Posts: 5,781

    chopolds
    Member
    from howell, nj
    1. Kustom Painters

    Gotta say, I'm not a big fan of using an airbrush with pearl or metallics...they have a different atomization and pattern that doesn't match a big spray gun, so almost every time I've tried to use one, it never matches. Even using a 'jamb gun' I can't get a good match. Always wind up going back to the same gun I shot it with.
    Besides depending on the size of the scratch, and whether you've gone down to bare metal, and the feathering out area of both primer and paint, the big gun is usually necessary.
     

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