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Daily driven question.

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by redzula, Jul 9, 2013.

  1. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 17,904

    gimpyshotrods
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

  2. Malcolm
    Joined: Feb 9, 2006
    Posts: 7,694

    Malcolm
    ALLIANCE MEMBER
    from Nebraska

    Cool little driver --- Congrats!
     
  3. el Scotto
    Joined: Mar 3, 2004
    Posts: 4,357

    el Scotto
    Member
    from Tracy, CA

    Wisdom!!
     
  4. OldColt
    Joined: Apr 7, 2013
    Posts: 504

    OldColt
    Member

    If the car is in good mechanical condition, I wouldn't hesitate driving it every day. Back in the 50's and 60's, my family knew quite a few guys who were traveling salesmen that put a couple of hundred or more miles on those cars every day, and didn't worry about it. Old cars were much more forgiving when they did malfunction, and a lot easier to be repaired at most any gas station or repair shop without highly trained technicians. Think nowdays, it might be wise to carry a few hard to get parts in the trunk like ignition points and stuff like that though.
     
  5. My WIFE drives the '61 Falcon daily. We have no other car. It is as reliable as they come.

    The brakes are NO concern, mostly because they are rebuilt with all new linings. The car stops with no worries. Better than a new car, because there is no interference between your foot and the linings. Many will disagree, but they have not driven her car.

    The wipers can be converted to electric very easily, just find an electric motor. The factory allowed for this by using the same controls for the wiper on both. You only need supply a positive power lead.

    Change the heater core. It's very cheap, and the old ones are filled with radiator stop leak (ask how I know). If you get a cheap one, it will be too thin. Build a wood frame and Bob's your uncle. The heater WILL roast your ass in no time, ESP. with a 195º thermostat, which I recommend.

    Get a manual. But, the Falcon manual is cheap, $25 will get you one brand-y new from Mac's. And get the owner's manual as well, Rock Auto has the cheapest.

    Rock Auto also has everything you need mechanically. Mac's will have everything else.

    The Load-O-Matic distributor is weird. I have mine setup with a lot of initial advance, knowing that my wife will not floor it (it pings at WOT setup that way). It helps a lot. Mac's has the newer distributors, but the oil pump drive is a different size on the centrifugal advance ones, 5/16 vs 1/4, so you'll need to machine the (new) drive, or change out the oil pump as well.

    Do not consider power steering, it sucks big time. (Made that mistake on the first falcon i had, never again)

    Change all the fluids. And just change the wheel bearings, you don't know what abuse they've taken. And they're real cheap.

    Neat feature on the vent doors: in summer, leave the right one open, if it gets too much, pull out the heater/fan knob, this effectively closes the door by switching the air to the floor.

    I had to lower the float to lean out the mixture. The factory setting does not mean much, as the specific gravity of modern fuels is less, meaning it takes less to pull fuel in. Thus the factory settings allows for a rich mixture.

    Alternator conversion is easy-peasy, PM me if you want.

    BTW, the 170 is all this car needs. Even with automatic, it's just fine. Tip, though: press the foot feed a bit more than usual to keep it in low; helps get it moving. Plus, you NEED the manual to adjust the linkages properly. It DOES make a difference. Ford does know what they are doing.

    There is probably a lot more I've just forgotten, but, my wife IS doing just what you are considering, so there is the experience out here.

    Cosmo
     
  6. Veach
    Joined: Jun 1, 2012
    Posts: 1,081

    Veach
    Member

    One thing to remember on those (a.k.a.: crotch coolers) I opened mine up one day and filled the Car full of wasp
     
  7. LeoH
    Joined: Nov 4, 2011
    Posts: 462

    LeoH
    Member
    from Reno, NV

    Very nice looking car, enjoy, and Happy Motoring! It being Iowa and all, I'm thinking getting those wipers up to snuff is almost as important than making sure the brakes are working ;)
     
  8. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 17,904

    gimpyshotrods
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I'll be going from vacuum to electric, before the rainy season sets in again.
     
  9. OldColt
    Joined: Apr 7, 2013
    Posts: 504

    OldColt
    Member

    One other thing I forgot to mention. A can of starting fluid for those really cold mornings. It's real easy to forget about that in this modern era of instant starting fuel injected cars. --- Steve ---
     
  10. ShortyLaVen
    Joined: Oct 13, 2008
    Posts: 647

    ShortyLaVen
    Member

    The newest car I've owned and daily driven was my '70 VW, but even being a 1970 it might has well have been built in WWII... Newest American car was my '66 Buick.. True about people cutting you off and not paying attention. I lost that car to a guy that ran a stop sign... Since then my DDs have been a '61 VW and my '53 Packard. By comparison, when I'm more worried about breaking down in my girlfriend's Honda than I am driving anything old. I think the biggest difference is I actually trust my work on my old cars, but I don't trust what ever dingaling fast-n-furios wannabe worked on her Honda before she bought it...
     
  11. Rusty O'Toole
    Joined: Sep 17, 2006
    Posts: 9,458

    Rusty O'Toole
    Member

    If your old car is in good shape compression wise and tuned properly it should start as easily as a new FI car. They did when they were new. Exception would be certain seventies cars with bat shit pollution control systems but even they can be improved.
     
  12. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 17,904

    gimpyshotrods
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    One pump of the pedal, to set the electric choke, and the recently rebuilt 144 in my Falcon starts, in a fraction of a rotation.
     
  13. I agree with the Gimp :) Our Falcon starts FASTER than new cars, it's even gotten comments to that effect from techs who've happened to be standing near when it's started.

    'Cept ours is a pull of the choke, then a twist of the key. Never more than a moment's cranking.

    Cosmo

    P.S. Really?!?! Starting fluid, in TENNESSEE?? Isn't it WARM there in the winter??
     
  14. mattrod68
    Joined: Jan 22, 2007
    Posts: 524

    mattrod68
    Member

    +1 on these recent posts. i dont know why people think old cars are fragile. if you cant drive your old car every day, it's either too radical or not tuned properly. they would not have lasted this long if they were as fragile as people think or treat them.

    welcome to the old car daily driver club, it's so rewarding. after a bad day at work sometimes just the drive home at sunset is enough to lift your spirits. if you live in california its even better, no winter break.

    matt
     
  15. 62rebel
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 2,816

    62rebel
    Member

    people think they're fragile because they've been raised to mistrust old things and yearn for NEW things. first thing they're taught in school; first thing their friends tell them. you gotta have NEW or you're not cool....
    I've owned more Falcons than any other car; about twelve at last reckoning, and I would drive one today if I had it. one of the best ones I had was a four door '64 with a 170 and automatic; drove it rain or shine every day in Charleston traffic without worries in 1997-98. I replaced the radiator after dragging it out of a scrapyard. put new tires on it and never looked back.
    inspect everything; replace anything questionable; set all specs to book values. carry spares. replace the fruit jar MC with a split system unit.
     
  16. GassersGarage
    Joined: Jul 1, 2007
    Posts: 4,728

    GassersGarage
    Member

    My concern would be insurance. Collector Car Insurance usually don't allow for daily use and regular insurance only covers blue book value.
     
  17. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 17,904

    gimpyshotrods
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Yup. That is the issue.
     
  18. bubba57
    Joined: May 12, 2009
    Posts: 144

    bubba57
    Member
    from k

    I drive a 1962 Falcon as a daily. Powered by a 144 with a three on the tree. It is my only car. Almost 70 miles a day on average. I told my insurance company what i had and they gave 2 choices, Classic or standard. I put standard(full coverage) for less than $200 every 6 months. I take my three kids with everywhere(8,3 and 1). I put new seat belts in the back for them. I also had the windows lightly tinted cause the sun was always in my son's face(facing rearward) .

    It
     
  19. 62rebel
    Joined: Sep 1, 2008
    Posts: 2,816

    62rebel
    Member

    think of it this way: Ford unveiled the Falcon in late '59 and kept the same basic design in production (with lots of adjustments) all the way into 1979 when the 1st series Granada ended production. Ford based the Fairlane and later the Torino unibody car on this design, and everybody knows there'd be NO Mustang without Falcon.... and basically, almost ANY upgrade available for a Mustang will work on a Falcon. the Falcon six ended production around '83; 24 years' worth of raw material to work with for carburetion, ignition, etc.... even then, the thing was cut down to four cylinders and used in Tempos.
    if you've got a strong, solid shell, you've got it made. everything else is elbow grease and wallet paper.
     
  20. Engine-Ear
    Joined: Jun 12, 2008
    Posts: 706

    Engine-Ear
    Alliance Vendor

    "I know I'll have to be maintaining it more and keep a closer eye in things but I'd really like to hear some advice from people who already use a classic car as a daily."

    My daily for the last 10 years has been a '62 Pontiac, either a Catalina or a Bonneville. I just brought back (by DRIVING it) a '64 Tempest (full story on the RediRad page on FB if you care) to consume for daily travel.

    IMO, what is important is that you have good rubber and good brakes. Also, at least four lap belts, esp one for the kiddo if you plan to wheel her around. Don't worry about rust-out. They may a lot of 'em and trust me (I know, trust a stranger) the memories you will make as you enjoy that Falcon will far outweigh the loss of the car from wear and rust from putting 100,000 miles on it.

    If you are new to daily use of a '60s car, I might also suggest you SLOW DOWN. Drive the posted limit or 5 over. By doing so you will get better mileage but moreover you'll give yourself extra stopping distance since all the chuckleheads need to be there 10 seconds before you and they're way ahead of you.

    Life is short. Enjoy the drive.
     
  21. diamond dave
    Joined: Jul 18, 2006
    Posts: 459

    diamond dave
    Member

    both, my 50 ford and my 58 chevy wagon were way more reliable than my late model junk. even in the winter. they both had awesome heaters that I usually had the window down. people used to look at me like I had a screw loose.
     
  22. redzula
    Joined: Jul 6, 2011
    Posts: 994

    redzula
    Member

    Well I've been driving it a bit we have had a lot of really icy storms this winter so I have taken the late model a lot too. I'm planning on parking my jeep when the weather starts warming up and driving the falcon even more.

    I spent some time this fall swapping to a HEI distributor, and 32/36 weber 2 barrel. Took a bit more work than normal as I had the smaller oil pump so I had to modify the distributor shaft to fit.

    Still need to tune the jets to be perfect but as long as I don't snap it to full throttle the thing runs great. If I try to go quickly to full throttle it hesitates for a couple seconds (go slowly to full and it can keep up) it's like the mix is off a little but 95% of the time it's not a problem so I haven't really messed with it. I put new wiper blades on it. O'Rlieys stocked the refills which was cool. The wipers are electric to correct when I said they were vacuum earlier the sprayer hoses still need replaced and I found a button on the floor next to the dimmer that looks like a pump for the sprayer. I grew up in the wrong time these things are so alien for a 80's/90's kid like me I think the dumbest things are really neat.

    Also a tip with the vent doors clean them out BEFORE opening them for the first time on your way to work in your nice button up and slacks. Lol I might as well have not showered that day.




    Posted using the Full Custom H.A.M.B. App!
     
  23. gimpyshotrods
    Joined: May 20, 2009
    Posts: 17,904

    gimpyshotrods
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Or install discs. My '60 stops faster than most late-models.
     
  24. luke13
    Joined: Oct 25, 2013
    Posts: 381

    luke13
    Member

    should be absolutly fine , dont sweat the small stuff, just warm it up properly and do oil etc etc when your supposed to. with my 56 ford i just fitted a brake booster off a late model falcon to run with the drums, it stopped on a dime after that, the brakes would fade if you to drive it hard though.
     
  25. luke13
    Joined: Oct 25, 2013
    Posts: 381

    luke13
    Member

    watch out for those lap belts, they damn near cut you in half in case of an accident, better off with out one, 3 point belts are definatly better if you love your family. lap belts can stay in the 60s. just my 2 cents.
     

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