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Cow Town Coach works today in the shop

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by tbauer, Mar 9, 2013.

  1. tbauer
    Joined: Jul 16, 2009
    Posts: 233

    tbauer
    Member

    I wanted to share some of the metal work that is going on in my shop. I'll try to keep it all HAMB friendly. Thanks! Here are some 1959 Buick patch panels that install between the rear of the door and the wheel well.


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    Using a rubberband on English Wheel

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  2. tbauer
    Joined: Jul 16, 2009
    Posts: 233

    tbauer
    Member

    Here are some pieces for a 1930 delivery. These pieces go inside the van by the rear doors and hold the trim panels against the wall. They are about 40 inches tall and made out of 18 gauge steel. The wall panels are held in place by the bead work along the edges. i made two but some how didn't take a photo of both of them.
     

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  3. bk53
    Joined: Feb 15, 2012
    Posts: 148

    bk53
    Member
    from Rowlett Tx

    nice looking work.
     
  4. HotRodHighley
    Joined: Feb 12, 2008
    Posts: 395

    HotRodHighley
    Member
    from cincy, oh


  5. BillyM
    Joined: Feb 9, 2010
    Posts: 144

    BillyM
    Member

    Very nice....more pictures please!
     
  6. tbauer
    Joined: Jul 16, 2009
    Posts: 233

    tbauer
    Member

    Here is a trim panel that goes inside the car above the wind shield on a 1936 ford. The primer one is an original. This panel holds a radio speaker,wipers ,inside sun visors and the head liner in place. They tend to rust away due to the cloth top inserts leaking on these cars. I usually start with a paper pattern , then it was cut out and the edge bent upward on the english wheel. There is a quarter inch fold on the flat edge for strength.
     

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  7. tbauer
    Joined: Jul 16, 2009
    Posts: 233

    tbauer
    Member

    Here is a 1936 ford fender i'm building from scratch. I had a passenger side fender so I had to make a reverse buck to work from.
     

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  8. That's some extremely nice work. HRP
     
  9. tbauer
    Joined: Jul 16, 2009
    Posts: 233

    tbauer
    Member

    Thanks, I enjoy making something tangible for flat sheet metal
     
  10. swimeasy
    Joined: Oct 17, 2006
    Posts: 1,067

    swimeasy
    Member

    That is cool!
     
  11. tbauer
    Joined: Jul 16, 2009
    Posts: 233

    tbauer
    Member

    Here are some custom fender skirts for a 1952 plymouth. I just made a pattern out of cardboard transferred it to metal adding 1 half inch all the way around. Then I english wheeled it a little to give them shape and strength. Then I bent the half inch flange inward to finish the edges. They look like helmets because the front of the fender is lower than the rear. But I'm sure there are other ways to finish the bottom.
     

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  12. 66tintop
    Joined: Nov 7, 2012
    Posts: 450

    66tintop
    Member
    from Canada

    very nice creative fab work ! thanks for sharing :)
     
  13. tbauer
    Joined: Jul 16, 2009
    Posts: 233

    tbauer
    Member

    Today I made these radiator brackets for a 1936 ford. These brackets rust out or are usually just missing.
     

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  14. heyitsnate
    Joined: Apr 8, 2004
    Posts: 1,742

    heyitsnate
    Member

    amazing! im dead stuck on my build. sheetmetal shaping escapes me, my confidence is shrinking daily....:( i took some pics of a couple 36 toe boards for you but its hard to post with my phone, so pm me your email address and ill send them.
     
  15. alchemy
    Joined: Sep 27, 2002
    Posts: 17,897

    alchemy
    Member

    For the '59 Buick part, are you using the wooden thing with a handle like a Pullmax? Just carve your die out of oak and start whacking at it?
     
  16. Irrational Metalworks
    Joined: Feb 5, 2007
    Posts: 589

    Irrational Metalworks
    Alliance Vendor
    from DFW

  17. EliteS&C
    Joined: Feb 3, 2013
    Posts: 112

    EliteS&C
    Member

    Wow! Damn nice fab work!
     
  18. tbauer
    Joined: Jul 16, 2009
    Posts: 233

    tbauer
    Member

    Here are a set of 1934 Oldsmobile running boards. They are each formed from one piece of 18 gauge sheet. Most of the work is done on the english wheel with a rubber band attached. I also used a tipping die on a bead roller to bend the flanges. i hope the multiple curves and bends are visible in the pictures, I find it difficult to photograph bare metal objects.
     

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  19. tbauer
    Joined: Jul 16, 2009
    Posts: 233

    tbauer
    Member

    Here is a door bottom for a 41' Ford panel truck. The door is up side down for these pictures. I left one side long so the customer could decide where to cut the panel in. There are a lot of curves going on here I hope the pictures show just how much.
     

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  20. Thanks for sharing! AWESOME.
     
  21. tbauer
    Joined: Jul 16, 2009
    Posts: 233

    tbauer
    Member

    I'm working on some 1933 Chevrolet fender skirts. I haven't quite figured out how to form the three raised spears on the outside or the rolled edge that holds the skirt on the fender. Any help from the HAMB metal gods would be appreciated .
     

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  22. Irrational Metalworks
    Joined: Feb 5, 2007
    Posts: 589

    Irrational Metalworks
    Alliance Vendor
    from DFW

    Pre stretch and use a bead roller to do the spears. They almost look like a Pullmax louver. If so, I might be able to help you out. I can't see enough detail on the outside edge to answer your question on that!
     
  23. 19Fordy
    Joined: May 17, 2003
    Posts: 7,513

    19Fordy
    Member

    Without giving away any trade secrets, what does it cost the customer when you make such high quality parts like that fender. The reason, I ask is because I just don't think most folks -even some car folks-understand what it takes to restore with that that level of craftsmanship.
     
  24. Nice work! thanks for posting it!
     
  25. tbauer
    Joined: Jul 16, 2009
    Posts: 233

    tbauer
    Member

    Thanks for the kind words guys!

    Tim , I would love to visit you and your shop. The spears taper off from front to back, so I am thinking of making a hammer form. But if you think the Pullman can do it I would appreciate your help.

    19fordy it's difficult to estimate the price on hand made parts, these will cost between $750.00 and $1000.00 when complete. There are many hours in the process from pattern to finished piece. And they need to fit the car!
     
  26. tbauer
    Joined: Jul 16, 2009
    Posts: 233

    tbauer
    Member

    Todays project are a set of fenders. I'm using a set of reproduction fiberglass ones to get patterns from. I map out on the metal where to stretch and/or shrink. I try to make bigger sections so there is less welding. Welding will distort the shape and require additional work. These sections are 11 inches wide and 48 inches long from front to back.
     

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    Last edited: Aug 21, 2013
  27. Irrational Metalworks
    Joined: Feb 5, 2007
    Posts: 589

    Irrational Metalworks
    Alliance Vendor
    from DFW

    Teds having fun today! Great start on the fenders.
     
  28. tbauer
    Joined: Jul 16, 2009
    Posts: 233

    tbauer
    Member

    I spent some more time on the fenders this week .
     
  29. tbauer
    Joined: Jul 16, 2009
    Posts: 233

    tbauer
    Member

    lets try again
     

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  30. damn nice stuff ur doing....gonna put Forwurth on the metal working and making map !!!
     

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