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Hot Rods Contemplating Retirement

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by Ryan, Mar 9, 2020.

  1. loudbang
    Joined: Jul 23, 2013
    Posts: 30,484

    loudbang
    Member

    Hate harsh your mellow but in this day and age if you are going to be transporting expensive "Stuff" you really need something the has a LOCKABLE storage area. Even paradise has tweekers now.
     
  2. seb fontana
    Joined: Sep 1, 2005
    Posts: 6,602

    seb fontana
    Member
    from ct

    Don't sit under a coconut tree, be ready for VOG.. If ya see Magnum say Hi for me..
     
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  3. 2OLD2FAST
    Joined: Feb 3, 2010
    Posts: 2,728

    2OLD2FAST
    Member
    from illinois

    Coming back from Hawaii ,the young man across the aisle and I started talking , he said he was moving back to the mainland after 4years. I had thoroughly enjoyed everything about the islands and asked why was he leaving , he smiled and said " how long can you operate in a small circle before it gets boring,".........
     
  4. I’ve spent a lot of time in Hawaii, about a year’s worth in three days to three weeks trips, while I was working. I retired about 23 years ago and have only been back about a half dozen times since. For a while I was looking for property to build on in Hawaii.

    My island to live on - retire to would have to be the Big Island, on the Hamakua coast or Hawi area at about 1500 feet elevation. Not too hot, not too cold, and, importantly, not too small. I love visiting Kauai, but it would be too small to live on.

    ...but for a car, a banger powered Model A or B touring with a folding top would work for most purposes. A roadster pickup wouldn’t be a bad choice if you are into gardening, farmer’s markets, fishing, and light construction projects. Most roads are on the narrow side and meant for slower traffic, so a lot of horsepower is not useful.

    On Kauai, I would probably look for a place Kapa’a side of the lighthouse, but near there. The issue being the island does not have a full loop around, and the lighthouse gives you a ways to go in both directions and not too far from an airport.
     
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  5. if you live in paradise where do you vacation?
     
  6. Funny...I used to work with 2 guys the were born and raised Hawaii...I would always say..why Detroit...it’s cold, grey, flat...they both said “because I didn’t see this in my future, welcome to the Honolulu Hilton” and yes they said they same thing about being stuck on a rock...I’d like to try it and make my own decision..
     
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  7. jnaki
    Joined: Jan 1, 2015
    Posts: 4,886

    jnaki





    Hello,
    Having gone to Kauai in the middle of the Summer Season for 30 days to stay with our friends, it was an eye opener. The photos of sunny Hawaii are always enticing and show a wonderful area consistent with relaxing and enjoying life. Kauai is a garden paradise, that is for sure. Since the wettest spot in the world is located in Kauai and can be seen from the North Shore easily, one can stop wondering if that area gets affected by rain. Where does all that water go? Down the mountain in a ton of waterfalls and down to the streams and rivers that end up in the ocean.
    upload_2020-3-10_4-52-36.png Mount Waialeale in the background. The wettest spot in the world, consistently and all year around. (The country of India has higher rainfall, but is in the monsoon time period only)

    The above photo was a plot of land that we wanted to buy. Our local So Cal banks said we could not but, because the property was out of state, and the local Kauai banks would not approve because WE were from out of state. We had excellent credit, but did not have the huge cash savings account. What a predicament. But, we got over that…

    The days we were in the North Shore in Hanalei, it rained every day. Every day in the Summer no less. But, as fast as the rain pelted everything for an hour or so, it stopped, got sunny and stayed that way until the afternoon. Then it rained again. Not a sprinkle, but rainfall drops noticeable on the street and cars. There might have been a day or two that did not rain, but it sprinkled or the mist just made everything wet. Needless to say, everything on that side of the mountain range was green, all the way down to the shoreline.

    We took some pine seedlings out of the shoreline waters and replanted them on our friend’s property.
    upload_2020-3-10_4-53-48.png
    By the end of our 30 day vacation, they were as high as the headlights and fender. In one year later, the pine trees were taller than the houses. Over the years they grew so tall and thick that they were trimmed down to a tall, thick fence height and is manageable. Why did they grow so much and so fast? Water, water and more water, as well as the great topsoil that has covered the whole valley since the early, Hawaiian King days. The north side has the green, the south side is the dry side and it looks like it, as one drives all around the island.
    upload_2020-3-10_4-54-26.png
    road to the south side of the island…surf spots

    So, the roads are full of locals, farmers and ranchers all along the narrow coastal highway. The scenery is outstanding and it was fun driving every day to a secluded surf spot or two. But, it has changed as do all places over time. The attraction of such a nice place is not downplayed, but every tourist business or company makes it like a paradise. So, needless to say, there are a ton of tourists all over the island. It is a destination, after all.
    upload_2020-3-10_4-55-55.png

    Jnaki

    So, with our experience in Kauai, we would not want to have a sedan delivery or van to drive around. The roads are hectic enough and the drivers are usually distracted at the scenery. The vehicle needs something to hold a bunch of stuff, family, and have a clear vision all around.
    upload_2020-3-10_4-57-28.png
    So, a 1955 Chevy station wagon with all of the modern amenities of handling and braking would make the daily drives super nice and safe. Although it will blend in nicely with other large size cars on the highways, at least you can see what is all around the station wagon. No one will sneak up on your blind side and it will be like being in a fish bowl/aquarium while driving all along the coastal highway.

    If the size of the 55 Chevy, two door wagon is too wide or large for the drives, then a smaller Ford Falcon Wagon, again with all of the safety items, great braking and handling could be an alternate for the family. That should allow squeezing into the parking spaces and small garages on the whole island.
    upload_2020-3-10_4-58-28.png
    With a few side curtains, the interior stuff, (diving equipment) and other necessities will be out of sight of prying eyes when parked at the beach, side streets, or parking lots.

    If my wife and I lived there in Kauai, we would have an all-wheel drive station wagon as our daily driver to cope with the constantly wet roads and sometimes high tides that wash over the main coastal highways. But, for the sunny days, as short lived as they may be, an open roadster or convertible would make my wife a happy camper. There are usually no 3 car garages available in the smaller housing areas, but a two car garage and a separate free standing building might suffice as the third car garage.
    upload_2020-3-10_4-59-3.png upload_2020-3-10_4-59-16.png v nak photos
    Even if you think you can’t surf well, at least you have the basics and there are plenty of spots to continue learning. But, most of the popular spots are for advanced surfers and those that are aware of what is lurking underneath the water’s surface.


    For us, Kauai was a nice place to visit, but we would not want to live there. As 20 somethings, we thought that was “the” place in the whole of the USA to live, work and retire. That is not so, these past 50 years up to today’s retirement living. Island living is paradise to some, but North America is a pretty big island, if you use the Panama Canal as a water, cut off zone. Don’t we all live on an island, so to speak? 71 percent water all around the world, pretty much makes all of us “islanders” at one time or another.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2020
  8. Mike
    Joined: Mar 5, 2001
    Posts: 3,504

    Mike
    Member

    Last edited: Mar 12, 2020
    loudbang likes this.
  9. jnaki
    Joined: Jan 1, 2015
    Posts: 4,886

    jnaki

    Hello,

    Right now, it has been raining and blowing strong winds for two days and will continue for several more days. But, that is a drop in the bucket compared to the rainy days and nights in Kauai. At least, we still live in So Cal and that is a relatively dry, Mediterranean climate zone with plenty of sunshine. The wet effect, along with sporadic high winds and storm fronts rolling by us, usually moves the systems on the way to the rest of the USA, within a day or two. So, get ready for more rain and storms by next Saturday/Sunday...

    Besides, we are out of the hurricane zone and one has not hit or come close since 1858. The 1939 storm that hit Long Beach was downgraded into a tropical storm, but did considerable damage. So, it has been over 162 years and if you count the 1939 tropical storm, 81 years since a hurricane has hit So Cal.

    Everyone has their own way to look at things and a retirement spot is the big choice, of course. We all want to have stuff organized, living environment secure and ready for the relaxing days of just "sitting" if need be, for that particular day. HOT RODS? So Cal has history and continues to be in the forefront of keeping the flame alive... Surf? There are plenty of natural waves all along the coast line. Artificial surf spots are 100 miles inland and will be popping up all over as the economy moves along well for all of us.

    The recent Kelly Slater wave pool has the most natural wave and outstanding shape of each curl for some exciting rides. A 100 miles from the Pacific Ocean? It could be in the middle of Texas or Oklahoma as a hot surf spot on the itinerary of a traveling vacationer.

    Jnaki
    One could wish that perfect surfing wave(s) were closer, but sometimes there are other things that need to be addressed for that final retirement home and compound. (Family, granddaughter, relatives, friends, weather, familiarity with the whole region, etc.) It all makes it worth while after contemplating where we all want to be for the last quarter.
     
  10. I've decided to go with the 40 Merc carson top and 29 roadster on Maui. Thats all I'm gonna need, maybe an old Bronco or Scout to drive onto the sand.
    Man, the problems we have :)
     
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  11. Ryan
    Joined: Jan 2, 1995
    Posts: 19,248

    Ryan
    ADMINISTRATOR
    from Austin, TX
    Staff Member

    It's as if these guys don't know me. I already live on an island of sorts. :)
     
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  12. A beater delivery. Drives like a car....works like a truck. It locks up so nobody can see your stuff too...When it gets rusted, slap another set of patch panels on it and go. An old wagon would be my second choice. 55WAGON.jpg deliveryN48chev.jpg
     
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  13. You and me both. It takes a special person :)
     
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  14. joeyesmen
    Joined: Dec 24, 2010
    Posts: 462

    joeyesmen
    Member

    Early 60's Studebaker Daytona Wagon, with the sliding roof panel. Don't see many of these hot-rodded, but I think it could be done right.

    d5bde45f02af4fdf195324346b3487c3.jpg
     
  15. I have the hot rod addiction, because of that, I can never retire
     
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  16. OLSKOOL57
    Joined: Feb 14, 2019
    Posts: 469

    OLSKOOL57
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Ryan,
    I retired early at 55 in 2003, friends kept saying aren’t you bored. I’ve been retired for 17 yrs. While I have had some health issues along the way, I have never been bored and enjoyed it immensely. Maybe this, A Bad Day Retired Is Better Than A Good Day Working. If you can afford to retire early,............do it.
     
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  17. CAL
    Joined: May 5, 2005
    Posts: 387

    CAL
    Member
    from Neosho Mo.

    Funny how people are so different. I have been working since I was 12 years old, (56 now). Have lived in the same old house for 30 years. When I finally get to retire, or if, all I want to do is be home, in the garage working. I have no desire to travel. I like my little world. To each there own. Hope it comes true for you.
     
  18. My HI friends say Las Vegas is where they all gather on the mainland, and always unexpectedly are meeting their HI friends and neighbors.
     
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  19. Halfdozen
    Joined: Mar 8, 2008
    Posts: 606

    Halfdozen
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    This.
    Or a bagged '60 Chev wagon...;)
     
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  20. Paul
    Joined: Aug 29, 2002
    Posts: 15,025

    Paul
    Editor

    My first thoughts were along the lines of Rocky's response
    Security and rust, I would want to know my stuff was relatively safe while I was in the water and salt air eats steel surprisingly fast
    An early fifties panel would do the job just fine
     
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  21. silverdome
    Joined: Aug 23, 2007
    Posts: 547

    silverdome
    Member

    Well everyone has chimed in some good suggestions. My first thought was a Model A Woody. I had the green Hot Wheels version when I was a kid and always thought it would be perfect for driving around on the islands.

    May all your dreams come true.
     
  22. interesting,..... an island in the middle of the desert.
     
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  23. There are actually some Hawaiian Restaurants in Vegas...
    https://www.islandflavor808.com/
     
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  24. hotrodjack33
    Joined: Aug 19, 2019
    Posts: 1,122

    hotrodjack33
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I agree with @chop&drop, a Sedan Delivery is what you need. The nimbleness of a hot rod, with room for your stuff...it will keep you dry and you can lock your stuff up.
    Built this one from a Fordor sedan. recently traded it to @Hamtown Al ...and he has it FOR SALE here on the HAMB !!! What more could you ask for ?;) 32a.jpg 32.jpg
     
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  25. tractorguy
    Joined: Jan 5, 2008
    Posts: 660

    tractorguy
    Member

    Late 1940's up to early 1960'd Willys Jeep station wagon preferably with 4wd.......or.......1950's up to 1966 Chevrolet Suburban CarryAll with 4wd. Have fun.
     
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  26. Pinstriper40
    Joined: Sep 24, 2007
    Posts: 3,334

    Pinstriper40
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Shoot, I'm contemplating retirement and I'm turning 33 this month... I just moved into a bigger shop and am finally able to have my "dream setup"... 2400 sq ft. of shop space and 600 sq ft of office/ parts storage. This place rules... But part of me (an increasingly large part) wants to go back to when I didn't have anything but a VAN and my pinstriping brushes....
    The freedom of the open road is calling. I'm going to work as hard as I can the next few years, then put everything in storage for 6 months and build my new shop... For mostly my own projects hopefully.

    One can dream.

    As far as the car goes, a guy really needs two... A utility vehicle and a roadster. If I were you Ryan I'd go for a sedan delivery instead of a panel truck. Maybe a '36-51 Ford woodie... Doesn't get any more Hawaii than that!
     
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  27. I retired after 30yrs as a Union carpenter. Bought myself a 33 3w Coupe. Then started a second career working for Hilti. Now I have plenty of Hotrod money. Wasn't gonna work any more, but couldn't pass up the offer. No plans on relocating or traveling the world. Just go to El Mirage, Bonneville, and many of the other things i've wanted to do.
     
    Tman, loudbang and teach'm like this.
  28. I'm with Tractorguy on the vehicle choice. Everybody's idea of retirement paradise is different, as it should be. Pulled the plug on paid work last year, wish I had done it sooner. My paradise is the Appalachian mountain trout stream I'll be fishing tomorrow morning.
     
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  29. The Hawaiian Sun is brutal, depending upon how fair skinned you are. Wind having to dress all bundled up like a leper. Everything on Maui was Sun bleached to pastel colors, pink fire hydrants, etc.... You'll wind up with skin problems or looking like a piece of beef jerky. I got Sun poisoning there in 2 hrs....Sun block is a must. Can't wade into certain areas in bare feet due to razor sharp volcanic rocks in the water.
     
    loudbang likes this.

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