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Technical citric acid

Discussion in 'The Hokey Ass Message Board' started by msgt tank, Apr 22, 2020.

  1. Jalopy Joker
    Joined: Sep 3, 2006
    Posts: 25,077

    Jalopy Joker
    Member

  2. ekimneirbo
    Joined: Apr 29, 2017
    Posts: 1,272

    ekimneirbo
    Member
    from Brooks Ky

    Well, I haven't tried mine yet but my plan is to drain it into the ditch at the back of my property where it will run downhill to a culvert that passes under the road and into an a**hole neighbors yard.
    40 years here and got along well with everyone.....they bring their broken things to me to fix....for free. Then a**hole moves in and starts crap with several of us......Yep, thats the plan!
     
  3. SEAAIRE354
    Joined: Sep 7, 2015
    Posts: 181

    SEAAIRE354
    Member

    God I hate sucky neighbors. And if you don’t mind me asking what are you using for a chemical in the degreaser tank? And btw the job box idea is brilliant.


    Sent from my iPad using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
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  4. VANDENPLAS
    Joined: Dec 14, 2009
    Posts: 2,446

    VANDENPLAS
    Member

    Citric acid and baking soda neutralized together is thought to be environmentally safe.

    with battery acid spills we have soaked it up with potash or smaller spills baking soda and wash it down the drain with water.

    have been told by the ministry of environment that asking as the acid has been neutralized it is basically just water and sediment at that point.

    you might get A-hole neighbour complaining if he sees grease or oil slicks in the water from any residual oil.
     
  5. Rusty O'Toole
    Joined: Sep 17, 2006
    Posts: 9,253

    Rusty O'Toole
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    Since citric acid is in many things we eat and drink I don't think it is toxic or we would all be dead.
     
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  6. alanp561
    Joined: Oct 1, 2017
    Posts: 1,100

    alanp561
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    I just dump it on my lawn. It doesn't hurt the grass and a lot of the flowers and shrubs we have in our yard really like acid. Makes them brighter.
     
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  7. VANDENPLAS
    Joined: Dec 14, 2009
    Posts: 2,446

    VANDENPLAS
    Member



    your 100% correct.

    but you get those environmental types and they get the under ware in a knot over just about anything.
    In the G.T.H.A ( greater Toronto hamilton area, basically the Golden Horseshoe.)
    You cannot wash your car in the driveway , cannot paint with spray paint, cannot repair your car in the driveway among others that I have never seen enforced as everyone does this stuff.
    But you get a dink of a neighbour and they can call bylaw control on you or who ever and your paying fines etc.
    I think it’s just good to know that using the citric acid and disposing of it in your yard or where ever you won’t have a “ nosy Parker”causing you grief.
    I don’t think there is anything worse then a neighbour who does not mind there own business.
     
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  8. ekimneirbo
    Joined: Apr 29, 2017
    Posts: 1,272

    ekimneirbo
    Member
    from Brooks Ky

    God I hate sucky neighbors. And if you don’t mind me asking what are you using for a chemical in the degreaser tank?
    Diesel Fuel, kerosene got too expensive. It lasts forever so I won't have to ever dump it.

    btw the job box idea is brilliant.
    Thanks for the compliment !
    I just dump it (citric acid) on my lawn. It doesn't hurt the grass and a lot of the flowers and shrubs we have in our yard really like acid. Makes them brighter.

    Dang!

     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2020
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  9. I dump it in the yard, warning though the rust in the mix will stain concrete pretty quick.

    Sent from my SM-A205U using The H.A.M.B. mobile app
     
  10. Reidy
    Joined: May 13, 2016
    Posts: 93

    Reidy
    Member

    What is the best/cheapest/easiest way to protect the metal after the citric acid bath. I am going to be trying it out on some panels that need work. The plan is is citric acid bath, then some form of protection whilst I do rust repairs and straighten them out. It will be up to a year before I am ready for paint as I am doing a bit at a time.

    I have heard of Gibbs but it is not as readily available locally here. I would like to use something that does not effect paint adhesion down the track.

    Thanks

    Steve from down under
     
  11. j hansen
    Joined: Dec 22, 2012
    Posts: 1,604

    j hansen
    Member
    from sweden

    I just spray WD-40 on it.The parts in front of the pic have been treated with citric acid and WD-40.
    The pic is from today but it`s been 18 months since I did it. Skärmavbild 2020-06-29 kl. 16.05.20.png
     
  12. RMONTY
    Joined: Jan 7, 2016
    Posts: 1,859

    RMONTY
    Member

    Got my acid tank all set up today. Dumped 20 pounds of powder in about 200 gallons of water. I threw a few parts in and within an hour or two the water was turning orange and lots of bubbles flowing. I will take some pics tomorrow and see how things look.
     
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  13. pigIRON63
    Joined: Nov 25, 2019
    Posts: 80

    pigIRON63

    I've used this stuff on all kinds of small parts. I like to mix it 5oz. To 1 gallon of water. I like to use hot water when mixing because it will dilute easier. I think the yellow build up on parts is actually the powdered acid depositing on the parts. I take my solution and transfer it every so often to another container. It helps with the yellow buildup.
     
  14. A 5 gallon bucket with some holes drilled in it works great for holding smaller parts in your bigger tank.

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  15. Fortunateson
    Joined: Apr 30, 2012
    Posts: 3,229

    Fortunateson
    Member

    I was thinking the same thing about the yellowish build up.
     
  16. Fortunateson
    Joined: Apr 30, 2012
    Posts: 3,229

    Fortunateson
    Member

    I did some more small parts in the citric bath and they turned out ok but I'm still a big believer in reverse electrolysis. Now I'm wondering if th two methods could be combined? Would the acid be neutralized by the washing soda cancelling out any benefit?
     
  17. beater40
    Joined: Sep 19, 2006
    Posts: 77

    beater40
    Member

    I just wipe phosphoric acid on and can stay clean for several years, it you get a little surface rust, just wipe a bit more on. When ready to etch, I just scuff the panel or part down, degrease and etch prime

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  18. beater40
    Joined: Sep 19, 2006
    Posts: 77

    beater40
    Member

    I would be very cautious about dropping an engine block in citric acid, try something cast iron first as a check. I derusted some old horse drawn parts years ago and it seemed to eat into some of it, like attacking one ingredient and it looked brittle to me. Since then I never put cast iron in the solution. Just my experience but it may have been for some other reason so it would pay to double check.

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  19. RMONTY
    Joined: Jan 7, 2016
    Posts: 1,859

    RMONTY
    Member

    I don't know what to say, other than holy shit! I will let the before and after pictures speak for themselves. These pieces were in the tank for less than 24 hours....I was skeptical when I pulled them out, until I put the high pressure nozzle on the water hose and rinsed them off........ 20200630_183248.jpg 20200701_143540.jpg
     
  20. bathcollector
    Joined: Jul 8, 2006
    Posts: 260

    bathcollector
    Member

    I need to clean the water jackets etc in my 272 in a 56 F100. Had the water pump rebuilt and a new core in the radiator, so don't want to bung them up. I am thinking of filling the block with either white vinegar or a citric acid mix and running it with an old water pump and no radiator to try flushing the crud out, it's pretty nasty looking inside. I have made a connector pipe for the hoses for circulation. maybe do a few cycles of heating and drain it. What do you guys think ?
     
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  21. j hansen
    Joined: Dec 22, 2012
    Posts: 1,604

    j hansen
    Member
    from sweden

    I like your idea,,have thought of it myself:)
     
  22. fuzzface
    Joined: Dec 7, 2006
    Posts: 1,299

    fuzzface
    Member

    you can buy it online thru Walmart too. 10# is $27.99 it comes in 2-5# bags , food grade by Alpha chemicals

    But you can also skip the middle man and buy from alpha chemicals online and it is only like $14.50 for the same 10#'s you buy at Walmart.
     
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  23. ekimneirbo
    Joined: Apr 29, 2017
    Posts: 1,272

    ekimneirbo
    Member
    from Brooks Ky

    I would think about standing the block up sitting on the bellhousing surface and filling the water jacket with whichever chemical/water mixture you decide to use. Then let it sit for a couple days and permeate. Wash it out and depending on what you see, maybe repeat that process. Then wash it out again and go with your original idea. That way the chemical has time to work its miracle without having the pump doing anything and maybe purge the worst of the rust before circulating for a while.;)
     
  24. Rusty O'Toole
    Joined: Sep 17, 2006
    Posts: 9,253

    Rusty O'Toole
    Member

    There are cooling system cleaners made for this. Or fill with fresh water and a bottle of CLR calcium lime and rust remover. You don't need to disconnect the rad. Just drive around a couple of days, drain and refill. It might take more than one application to get it clean if it is real dirty. If you get leaks in the rad or heater it is most likely because the CLR dissolved lime and crud that was plugging up holes that were already there.
     
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  25. bathcollector
    Joined: Jul 8, 2006
    Posts: 260

    bathcollector
    Member

    The engine is still in the truck. I have tried CLR straight on some of the flaky stuff but it didn't seem to do much.
     
  26. ekimneirbo
    Joined: Apr 29, 2017
    Posts: 1,272

    ekimneirbo
    Member
    from Brooks Ky

    Ok, if its still in the truck, just fill it with the chemical and make sure your hoses are higher than the block. Get some PVC pipe or something to extend the hoses upward. Then fill it and let the air burp out. you can try turning the water pump to assist purging the air. Let it sit a couple of days, then hook your garden hose to it and purge the rusty water. I'd do that again for a few days and purge it a second time. Then I would just flush it with your garden hose till clean stuff is coming out. As long as you extend the hoses up higher than the engine the stuff can just sit inside the engine.
     
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  27. alanp561
    Joined: Oct 1, 2017
    Posts: 1,100

    alanp561
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Told ya;) BTW, I don't use the soda bath, I just wash with the power washer everything is clean, let it dry and spray with Boeshield T-9. If it's good enough for the airlines to protect all the surplus airplanes sitting out in the desert at Mojave, CA for years, it's probably good enough for car parts. I don't like using WD-40 since they added silicone to it.
     
  28. BC, and or run some CLR through it and it will remove the calcium in the corners
     
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  29. bchctybob
    Joined: Sep 18, 2011
    Posts: 2,293

    bchctybob
    ALLIANCE MEMBER

    Myself I would be careful putting anything other than an automotive cooling system cleaner in a running, driving engine, it may mess with the gaskets (turn composites to mush?). Maybe soak an old head gasket to see what happens?
    I was a CLR fan too but it seems like they reformulated it to be more environmentally friendly or something because it hasn’t worked very well the last couple times I used it.
    I’ve been wanting to try the citric acid and now that my molasses tank is empty I might try it but I don’t have any rusty stuff to derust right now. I don’t know how that happened


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  30. Ranex rust buster. You can get it from Bunnings. It basically a phosphoric acid formula. Wipe down or spray with a plastic trigger spray bottle. Then just let it dry, maybe wipe it down if you get things super soaked. It will get rid of the fresh flash rust and keep the parts protected.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2020
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